composers biography : Ci - Cz
 



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NameBornDiedInformation
Ciaia (or Ciaja), Alessandro della
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fl. 1650-1666 Sienese nobleman (contemporary with Azzolino’s grandfather) and accademico intronato who studied with Desiderio Pecci, was a composer, singer and performer on the monochord, lute and theorbo. He published a set of five-voice madrigals with continuo as his op.1 (Venice, 1636), a set of Lamentationi sagre e motetti for solo voice and continuo as op.2 (Venice, 1650), and Sacri modulatus for two to nine voices as op.3 (Bologna, 1666)
Ciaia (or Ciaja), Azzolino Bernardino della
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21 May 1671
Siena, Italy
15 Jan. 1755
Pisa, Italy
Italian organist and composer
Ciampi, Francesco
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c.1690
possibly Massa or Pisa
after 1764Italian composer
Ciampi, Vincenzo (Legrenzio)c.1719
Piacenza
30 Mar. 1762
Venice, Italy
Italian composer, and a pupil of Durante. He was resident in London 1748-60, and from then to his death was maestro di cappella at the Ospizio degli Incurabili in Venice
Ciampolini, Daniel
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1961
France
 joined the Conservatoire de Nice (France) at the age of nine, while at the same time, studying drums and jazz with his father, with whom he later played in a famous Parisian cabaret. He won first prize for percussion at the Conservatoire de Paris, studied harmony and in 1980 became part of the Ensemble Intercontemporain. In 1986, during his stay at the Berkeley College of Music in Boston, he mastered the vibraphone. In his repertoire he includes the Pieces for Timpani by Elliott Carter, Losing Touch (vibraphone solo) by Edmund Campion, Piano Phase by Steve Reich and Psappha by Iannis Xenakis, of which he has created a spatialised, electronic version
Cianchettina, Veronica Dussek17791853a fine Bohemian pianist who wrote many pieces. Her five year old son, Pio, toured as a prodigy
Ciardi, Cesare
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1818
Florence, Italy
1877
Strel'na
Italian flautist and composer
Cibbini, Katherine17901858daughter of composer Kozeluch, she published many of her works under her maiden name
Cicognini, Alessandro
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25 Jan. 1906
Pescara, Italy
9 Nov. 1995
Rome, Italy;
Italian composer who scored numerous neorealist films of the late 1940s and the 1950s but he is especially known for providing music for some of Vittorio DeSica's most famous films
Ciconia, Johannes
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c. 1335/c.137010 Jun/12 Jul. 1412
Padua, Italy
Flemish composer and priest who was born in Liège. There is some confusion between father and son who both bear the same name. The Johannes Ciconia who worked in Italy from 1358 to 1367 was probably the composer's father (who would date from c.1335). In which case, it was Johannes Ciconia the son (who dates from c.1370) who composed both sacred and secular music and wrote several musical treatises
Cifra, Antonio
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1584
Terracina
2 Oct. 1629
Loreto, Italy
Italian composer of the Roman School of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was one of the significant transitional figures between the Renaissance and Baroque styles, and produced music in both idioms
Ciglic, Zvonimir
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20 Feb. 1921
Ljubljana, Slovenia
21 Jan. 2006
Ljubljana, Slovenia
Slovenian composer, teacher and conductor
Cigrang, Edmond
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1922
Luxembourg
 singing teacher and composer from Luxembourg
Cikker, Ján
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29 Jul. 1911
Banská Bystrica
21 Dec. 1989
Bratislava
composer of operas, including Resurrection and Mr. Scrooge, as well as orchestral, chamber and piano works
Cilea, Francesco
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26 Jul. 1866
Palmi, Italy
20 Nov. 1950
Savona, Italy
composer mainly of operas, including Adrienne Lecouvreur, sonatas for 'cello and piano and solos for piano
Cima, (Giovanni) Andrea
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c. 1580
Milan, Italy
after 1627Italian composer of the early Baroque period, brother of Giovanni Paolo Cima
Cima, Giovanni Paolo
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c.1570
Milan, Italy
1622
Milan, Italy
an Italian composer and organist in the early Baroque era. He was a contemporary of the composers Claudio Monteverdi, Girolamo Frescobaldi, and Alessandro Stradella. He is not be confused with the artist Giovanni Battista Cima, called Cima da Conegliano
Cimador (or Cimadoro), Giambattista [Giovanni Battista; J. B.] 1761
Venice, Italy
27 Feb. 1805
Bath, England
Italian composer
Cimarosa, Domenico
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17 Dec. 1749
Aversa, Italy
11 Jan. 1801
Venice, Italy
pupil of Sacchini and Piccinni; sometime called the 'Italian Mozart', he held revolutionary opinions which led to his arrest, imprisonment, a death sentence from which he was reprieved, and finally banishment from Naples; composer of church music and more than 60 operas. Leopold II commissioned from him a comic opera. The result was the great comic opera Il Matrimonio Segreto, which premiered in January 1792, roughly six weeks after Mozart's death. It remains one of the world's best known and popular comic operas
Cimello, (Giovanni) Tomaso
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c.1510after 1579Italian composer and poet, who taught music in Naples, worked in Rome and at the seminary of Bénévent (1571-1573)
Cinelu, Mino
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1957
Saint-Cloud, Paris, France
 French composer, programmer and producer who is most widely known as a percussionist
Cioffi, Giuseppe
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3 Nov. 1901
Naples, Italy
1976Neapolitan composer
Cioffi, Luigi
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  Neapolitan composer, son of Giuseppe Cioffi
Cipolla, Francescofl. 1785/6 Italian composer
Cipra, Milo
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13 Oct. 1906
Vares, Bosnia and Herzegovina
9 Jul. 1985
Zagreb, Croatia
Croatian composer
Cipriani, Alessandro
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  Italian composer
Cirillo (or Cerilli), Francesco4 Feb. 1623
Grumo Nevano, Aversa, nr. Naples
after 1677Italian composer
Cisternino, Nicola
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1957
San Giovanni Rotando, Foggia, Italy
 Italian composer
Cittadini, Santiago
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fl. 19th/20th Cent) composer and lyricist of the popular Italian song Ninna Nanna (Sleep, darling, sleep) made popular by Beniamino Gigli
[entry corrected by Ken Wilson]
Ciurlionis, Mikalojus Konstantinas (originally Èiurlionis, Mikalojus Konstantinas)
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22 Sep. 1875
Old Varena, Lithuenia
10 Apr. 1911
Pustelnik, nr Warsaw, Poland
Lithuanian composer and painter. During his short life he composed about 250 pieces of music and created about 300 paintings. The majority of his paintings are housed in the M. K. Ciurlionis National Museum of Art, in Kaunas, Lithuania. His works have had a profound influence on modern Lithuanian culture
[entry prompted by Timas Pelanis]
Cividale, Antonio da (also Antonius de Civitate Austrie)
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fl. 1392-1421
probably from Cividale del Friuli, Italy
 Italian composer of the early quattrocento, at the end of the musical medieval era and beginning of the Renaissance. He is one of a few Italian composers of the early 15th century whose works have survived; they are transitional between the trecento and the early Renaissance styles
Civitareale, Walter
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2 Aug. 1954
Differdange, Luxembourg
 pianist and composer from Luxembourg
Civitate Austrie, Antonius de (see Cividale, Antonio da)   
Claesen, Ludo
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22 Mar. 1956
Genk, Belgium
 Belgian composer
Claeys, Wim
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  Belgian accordionist and composer
Claflin, (Alan) Avery
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21 Jun. 1898
Keene, N.H., USA
9 Jun. 1979
Greenwich, Conn, USA
businessman; composer of operas, orchestral and choral music and chamber music
Clagget (or Claggett, Claggitt), Walterc.1741
possibly Waterford
1798Irish composer
Clair, Leslie (pseudonym for Leslie Judah Solley)19051968barrister and one time a Member of Parliament for the Thurrock constituency in Essex, as ‘Leslie Clair’ he was also known in music circles, and in 1957 worked for a while with Barry Gray on the TV series The Adventures of Twizzle composing the theme which, appropriately, was known as The Twizzle Song (the lyrics were provided by Roberta Lee). The London publishers Chappell & Co. recorded Clair’s best-known piece Dance of the Blue Marionettes for their Recorded Music Library in 1947 with Sidney Torch conducting the Queen’s Hall Light Orchestra
Clan, Carlo Maria16691745 
Clapisson, [Antonin] (Antoine-)Louis15 Sep. 1808
Naples, Italy
19 Mar. 1866
Paris, France
French violinist and composer of comic operas
Clapp, Philip Greeley4 Aug. 1888
Boston, USA
9 Apr. 1954
Iowa City, USA
American composer
Clapperton, James
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1968
Aberdeen, Scotland
 Scottish pianist and composer who is Artistic Director of the Music Factory festival in Norway and was the composer in residence at the Grigakadamiet Institutt for Musikk from 1998 to 2000
Clari, Giovanni Carlo Maria
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27 Sep. 1677
Pisa
16 May 1754
Pisa
Italian composer
Claribel (really Mrs Barnard)
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England, 1830Dover, 1869a composer of a great quantity of gentle, melodic songs, that were popular in their day
Clark, Frederick Scotson
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London, 1840London, 1883clergyman, schoolmaster and organist; composer of many popular works for organ
Clark, Patrick David
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1967 Clark's education includes a Master's degree in composition from the University of Arizona and a Doctor of Musical Arts from Rice University, as well as fellowships at Tanglewood, the Conductor's Institute of South Carolina (1995), and the Summer Course in Composition, directed by Ladislav Kubic in Prague, Czech-Republic (1994). From 1998 to 2001, Clark studied with Louis Andriessen and Martijn Padding in Holland. Theatrical works have been the main focus of Clark's recent projects, including recent works based on Shakespeare, Kerouac, Herman Gorter and Louis Aragon. The Netherlands Ballet Orkest performed Clark's work for symphonic orchestra, Wet Crimson on Chiricahua in September 2000.
Clark, Sonny
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21 Jul. 1931
Herminie, Pennsylvania, USA
13 Jan. 1963
New York, USA
American hard bop pianist. An underappreciated jazz artist during his time, Clark's work has become much more widely known after his death. Strongly influenced by Bud Powell, Clark is known for his unique touch, sense of melody and complex, hard-swinging style.
Clark, Thomas
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bap. 17751859English composer of psalmody
Clarke, Douglas
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1893
England
1962
Warwick, England
conductor; compositions include works for orchestra
Clarke, Henry Leland
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9 Mar. 1907
Dover, N.H., USA
 American composer and scholar
Clarke, James
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15 Oct. 1957
London, England
 English composer who has been a visiting professor at universities in various countries, including Azerbaijan, where he was appointed an honorary Professor of Music at the Baku Music Academy; Russia, at the Moscow Conservatoire, and Sweden, at the University of Malmö. He has led composition courses at the Time of Music Festival in Viitasaari, Finland, where he was featured composer in 2000, and at the Festival junger Künstler Bayreuth. He was a featured composer at the 2004 Ars Musica festival in Brussels, where ten works were performed in the largest survey of Clarke’s music to date
Clarke, James Peyton
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1807/8
Ebinburgh, Scotland
1877
Canada
Canadian composer who was the first person to receive a bachelor's degree in music in North America. He is best known for his work Lays of the Maple Leaf (1853)
Clarke, Janeearly 19th century
England
 excellent organist and published a setting of psalms in 1818
Clarke, Jeremiah
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c. 1674
London, England
1 Dec. 1707
England
pupil of Blow; organist and composer of music for harpsichord, including The Prince of Denmark's March which is known erroneously as 'Purcell's Trumpet Voluntary', for the church and for the theatre; shot himself after a disappointment in love
Clarke, Dr. John
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17701836organist and composer of many glees and an early arranger of Handel's oratorios. In 1810 he added the name Whitfield to his paternal name of Clarke
Clarke, Nigel
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1960 began his musical career as trumpeter in the British military, but a developing interest in Composition stimulated by the New Polish School of composers took him to the Royal Academy of Music to study with Paul Patterson (1982-6). Here his striking originality and capacity for hard work were recognised with several significant awards including the Parker Manson Prize (adjudicated by Sir Michael Tippett) and the Queen’s Commendation for Excellence, the Royal Academy of Music’s highest distinction
Clarke, Rebecca Helferich (Friskin)
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27 Aug 1886
Harrow
13 Oct 1979
New York, USA
an English classical composer and violist best known for her chamber music featuring the viola. She is considered one of the most important British composers in the interwar period between World War I and World War II; she has also been described as the most distinguished British female composer of her generation. Though she wrote little, due in part to her ideas about the role of a female composer, her work was recognized for its compositional skill. Most of Clarke's works have yet to be published (or have only recently been published), and her work was largely forgotten after she stopped composing. Scholarship and interest in her work revived when she reached her ninetieth birthday in 1976
Clarke, Rhona
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12 Jan. 1958
Dublin, Ireland
 Irish composer
Clarke-Whitfield, John
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1770
Gloucester
1836
Hereford
organist and composer of popular church music
Clarus, Max31 Mar. 1852
Mühlberg
6 Dec. 1916
Braunschweig
German composer
Clavé, (José) Anselmo21 Apr. 1824
Barcelona
24 Feb. 1874
Barcelona
Spanish composer
Clavel, Joseph
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20 Dec. 1800
Nantes, France
31 Aug. 1852
Sillé-le-Guillaume, France
French violinist and composer of chamber music
Clay, Frédéric (Emes)
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3 Aug 1838
Paris, France
24 Nov 1889
Great Marlow, Bucks
English composer known principally for his music written for the stage. He was born in Paris, the son of James Clay, a Member of Parliament, who was celebrated as a player of whist and the author of a treatise on that subject. The son was a composer of operas, cantatas and popular songs including I'll sing thee songs of Araby
Clay, Paul B. (also Paulo Clay)
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  sound designer, editor and composer
Clayton, Buck (born Wilbur Dorsey Clayton)
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12 Nov. 1911
Parsons, Kansas, USA
8 Dec. 1991
New York, USA
American jazz trumpet player. Clayton worked closely with Li Jinhui, father of Chinese popular music in Shanghai which was to change the course of music history in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan
Clayton, Jay
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28 Oct. 1941
Youngstown, Ohio, USA
 avant-garde vocalist, educator and composer
Clayton jnr., John
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  double-bassist, composer and arranger in both the jazz and classical fields
Clayton, Thomasc.1660-70c.1720-30English composer
Clearfield, Andrea
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1960 a native of Philadelphia, she has composed for virtually every medium and her works are frequently performed internationally. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Music from Muhlenberg College, a Master of Music in Piano from The University of the Arts, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition from Temple University. Since 1986, Dr. Clearfield has served on the faculty of The University of the Arts where she teaches Composition and Interarts, and the Sarasota Music Festival. She is the host and producer of the Philadelphia SALON Concert Series, featuring contemporary, classical, jazz, electronic and world music, founded in 1987
Cleary, Siobhán
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1970
Dublin, Ireland
 Irish composer
Cleemput, Werner van14 Jul. 1930
Saint-Nicolas, Flandre Orientale
 Belgian composer
Clemens non Papa (Jacques or Jacob Clement)
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c. 1510/15151555/56Flemish composer of masses, motets and other sacred works; his sobriquet may be explained by the need to distinguish him from Pope Celement VIII or from the Flemish poet, Jacobus Papa, who like the composer lived in Ypres
Clément, Charles-Françoisc.1720
Provence
after 1782
possibly Paris
French composer
Clément, (Jacques) Félix (Alfred)13 Jan. 1822
Paris, France
23 Jan. 1885
Paris, France
French composer
Clementi, Aldo
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Italy, 1925 composer of concerto for 2 pianos and wind orchestra and of chamber music works, including Ideograms and Informels
Clementi, Muzio [Mutius Philippus Vincentius Franciscus Xaverius]
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24 Jan 1752
Rome, Italy
10 Mar 1832
Evesham, Worcs., UK
prodigal pianist who was brought to England by the English Member of Parliament, Peter Beckford; the author of piano studies entitled Gradus ad Parnassum, successful piano manufacturer based in London; the first composer to develop a distinct, often descriptive, pianistic style of composition and piano sonatas, of which he wrote more than 60, directly influenced Beethoven. He taught J. B. Cramer, John Fields and Johann Hummel. In 1781 he appeared in contest with Mozart before Joseph II; general agreement being that Mozart probably "won". Mozart considered that Clementi possessed not the slightest taste or feeling in playing, being merely a mechanicus. Clementi commenting on Mozart’s playing said, "Never before had I heard anyone play with such grace and spirit"
Clementi, Orazio
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c. 1637
Padua, Italy
1 Aug. 1708
probably Vienna, Austria
a theorboist, he was a member of the court orchestra in Vienna. He also composed pieces for the guitar
Cleobury, Stephen
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31 Dec. 1948
England
 English organist, conductor, composer and arranger
Clérambault, Louis Nicolas
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19 Dec. 1676
Paris, France
26 Oct. 1749
Paris, France
organist and composer of music for keyboard; also composed four books of fine cantatas
Clerck, Patrick de
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1958
ostende, Belgium
 Belgian composer
Clérice, Justin16 Oct. 1863
Buenos Aires
9 Sep. 1908
Toulouse, France
Argentian-born composer
Clérisse, Robert
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18991973French composer and saxophonist, founder of the Marcel Mule saxophone quartet
Clerk of Penicuik, Sir John
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16764 Oct. 1755
Penicuik House, Scotland
student of Corelli, he appears to have given up composition altogether by the time he reached 30, for a highly successful law career in his native Scotland: eventually he was one of the signatories to the Treaty of Union with England, although his music shows him to have been a keen Scots patriot. His work was never published, and as far as we know the music survives only in his own papers, which are lodged in the Scottish Record Office in Edinburgh
Clifford, Julian
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1877
London, UK
1921
London, UK
pianist, conductor and composer of works for orchestra, piano and voice
Clifford, Hubert John
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1904
Bairnsdale, Victoria, Australia
1959
Singapore
conductor and composer including light music under various pseudonyms. Clifford was Director of Music for film director Sir Alexander Korda. As such he wrote the accompaniment of the Casanova Night Club sequence in The Third Man, published separately as The Casanova Melody. For this Clifford used his pseudonym Michael Sarsfield. He composed a symphony in 1940. Its turbulent first movement is very much in the tradition of Walton's First, and the composer was not unhappy at it being associated with the wartime spirit. The symphony was started in January 1938 and completed in August 1940 during one of the first air raids on London. Commentators have remarked on its "unusual fluency and power", and certainly the first movement at least has the striking immediacy of a film score, and in the last movement the driving energy is crowned triumphantly by the main theme of the opening movement returning on trumpets in their highest register. His piece Atomic Energy, is scored for bass (alto) flute, heckelphone, E flat clarinet and vibraphone as well as the more usual orchestral instruments. The Serenade for Strings, in four movements, is a work of substance; Five Nursery Tunes was broadcast for the first time by the BBC Symphony Orchestra in May 1941. He wrote for other British films, notably Bachelor of Hearts (1958), The Dark Man (1950), House of Secrets (1956), The One That Got Away (1957) and Hunted (1952). He provided attractive contributions to the light orchestral suite in the Cowes Suite and the Kentish Suite, whose five movements are Dover, Canterbury (a prelude on Orlando Gibbons hymn tune of that name), Pastoral and Folk Song, Swift Nicks of Gads Hill and Greenwich, subtitled Pageant of the River. He penned Four Sketches from As You Like It for strings and a couple of brass fanfares, one for Australia Day, the other derived from the Cowes Suite. Clifford was a professor at the RAM after leaving the BBC in 1944
Cliquet Pleyel, Henri
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12 Mar. 1894
Paris, France
5 Sep. 1963
Paris, France
French composer
Cloërec, René
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31 May 1911
Paris, France
13 Dec. 1995 French composer noted for his film scores
[entry corrected by W. Pin]
Clokey, Joseph Waddell28 Aug. 1890
New Albany, Ind., USA
14 Sep. 1950
Covina, Calif., USA
American composer
Clozier, Christian
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25 Aug. 1945
Compiègne, France
 co-founder and director of the Interational Institute of Electroacoustic Music of Bourges. He created the Gmebaphone for the diffusion of electroacoustic sound in concert and the Gmebogosse for amateur musicians, produced numerous musical shows at prestigious historical sites and is responsible for the founding of the International Confederation of Electroacoustic Music (CIME)
Clucas, Humphrey
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1941 English composer particularly of choral, mostly liturgical, music and music for orgen
Clutsam, George Howard
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26 Sep. 1866
Sydney N.S.W., Australia
17 Nov. 1951
London, England
pianist/accompanist and critic who settled in England in 1899 and composed a symphony, songs and operettas, one, Lilac Time, infamously 'editing' the music of Schubert
Coates, Albert Henry23 Apr. 1882
St. Petersburg, Russia
11 Dec. 1953
Cape Town, South Africa
Russian-born conductor who studied in Leipzig and who composed operas, Samuel Pepys, Pickwick and Tafelberg se Kleed
Coates, Eric
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27 Aug. 1886
Hucknall, Notts., England
21 Dec. 1957
Chichester, England
viola player; composer of songs and works for orchestra generally light in character, for example The Three Bears and The Three Elizabeths
Coates, Gloria
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10 Oct. 1938
Wisconsin, USA
 American composer who has composed works for orchestra (including 14 symphonies), vocal music with piano and orchestral accompaniment, numerous chamber music works for two to nine instruments (including 8 string quartets), solo instrumental pieces, choral works, electronic, and music for the theatre
Cobb, Gerard Francis
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1838
Nettlestead, England
1904
Cambridge, England
university teacher and prolific composer of church music, songs, part-songs, chamber music and pieces for piano
Cobbold, William1560
Norwich, England
7 Nov. 1639
Beccles, Suffolk
English organist and composer
Cocchi, Gioacchinoc.1720
possibly Naples, Italy
after 1788
probably Venice
Italian composer
Coccia, Carlo
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14 Apr. 1782
Naples, Italy
13 Apr. 1873
Naples, Italy
Italian opera composer
Coccia, Maria Rosa4 Jan. 1759
Rome, Italy
Nov. 1833a composer from the age of fourteen, at the age of fifteen she received the title of maestra di cappella from the Accademia Filarmonia of Bologna. Her works were successful during her lifetime
Cochereau, Pierre
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9 Jul. 1924
St. Mandre, France
6 Mar. 1984
Lyons, France
French organist and composer
Cockshott, Gerald Wilfred14 Nov. 1915
Bristol, England
3 Feb. 1979
London, England
English composer
Coco, Mllefl. 1709 composer who was published in Paris in 1709
Cocq, François le
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c.16851729Le Cocq taught the guitar to the wife of the Elector of Bavaria and is reported to have played to the sister of the Archduke Charles of Austria, later emperor Charles VI. In 1729 Le Cocq had retired from his position as musician of the Chapel Royal in Brussels
Codax, Martin
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early 13th century the identity of Martin Codax is essentially synonymous with his seven surviving Cantigas de Amigo, which have been dated somewhat precariously to c.1230
Coelho, Manuel Rodrigues
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c. 1555
Portugal
after 1633Portuguese organist and composer who published Flores de musica (1620), one of only two volumes of Iberian keyboard music to appear in print during the entire 17th century
Coelho, Ruy2 Mar. 1892
Alcaçer do Sal
5 May 1986
Lisbon, Portugal
Portuguese composer
Coen, Massimo
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1933
Rome, Italy
 Italian violinist and composer
Coenen, Johannes Meinhardus1824
The Hague, The Netherlands
1899
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Dutch composer
Coenen, Willem17 Nov. 1837
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
18 Mar. 1918
Lugano, Italy
Dutch pianist and composer who trained in Holland before settling in London in 1862 where he was a well-known piano teacher
Coerne, Louis Adolph (Adolphe)27 Feb. 1870
Newark, N.J., USA
11 Sep. 1922
Boston, Mass., USA
composer of music in a variety of forms including an opera Zenobia
Coferati, Matteo7 Jul. 163816 Jan. 1703
Florence, Italy
singer, composer and chaplain at Florence cathedral for nearly 45 years
Cogan (or Coogan), Philipc. 1748
Cork, Ireland
3 Feb. 1833
Dublin, Ireland
arguably the most important and it seems the most prolifc composer working in Dublin at the close of the 18th century. He became a boy chorister in St. Fin Barre's Cathedral there under William Smith. Later he became an adult member of that choir before deciding to go to Dublin in 1772 (at the age of 24). He was appointed as a stipendiary in the choir of Christ Church Cathedral on his arrival in Dublin. It seems he didn’t stay long in the post soon resigning to become organist of John's Church in 1778. Two years, later on 14th November 1780 he was appointed Organist of St. Patrick's Cathedral. Besides being a notable performer on pianoforte, harpsichord and organ, and a busy teacher, Philip Cogan also managed to be a prolific composer. His published output runs to two piano concertos, something like twenty piano sonatas, five sonatas for Violin and Piano, some separate piano pieces (variations, rondos and the like) and a number of songs, including one for voice, two violins and figured bass. Most of his works are extant but some of the piano sonatas seem to have been lost. Besides these published works, there is some church music in the manuscript music library of Christ Church Cathedral
Cohan, George Michael
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4 Jul. 1878
Providence, RI, USA
5 Nov. 1942
New York City, NY, USA
actor, composer, lyricist, librettist, playwright, producer and director
Cohen, Jules-Émile-David2 Nov. 1835
Marseilles
13 Jan. 1901
Paris, France
French composer
Cohen, Leonard
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21 Sep. 1934
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
 poet and songwriter whose first book of poetry was Let Us Compare Mythologies... (1956). A graduate of McGill University, Cohen went on to write several novels, including Beautiful Losers (1967). Also a singer and songwriter, Cohen released the first of several albums including Songs of Leonard Cohen in 1967. He has composed scores for such films as Bird on a Wire (1990) and Love, etc (1996). The 1997 documentary film, Leonard Cohen, Spring 1996 follows his daily life as a poet and singer
Cohen, Léonce12 Feb. 1829
Paris, France
c. 1884French violinist and composer of works for violin, light opera, etc.
Cohn, Arthur6 Nov. 1910
USA
1998
USA
music publishing executive, violinist, composer, conductor and writer whose compositions include 6 string quartets and Quotations in percussion for 103 instruments and 6 players
Cohn, James (Myron)12 Feb. 1928
Newark, N.J., USA
 American composer
Coignet, Horace13 May 1735
Lyon
29 Aug. 1821
Lyon
French composer
Coincy, Gautier de11771236Gauthier de Coincy's monumental verse narrative Les Miracles de Nostre-Dame, brings to life a fascinating page of medieval history, shedding light on the profound, and sometimes mysterious, connections between music and piety in thirteenth-century Europe. This trouvère monk, as he was known, created the earliest significant collection of vernacular Marian songs. While trouvère poetry and music are profoundly secular, even earthy, Coincy's songs dedicated to the Virgin Mary are not in any way profane, for the Marian cult in the Middle Ages sprang from the wellsprings of popular piety, which the Church eventually accepted to a certain degree
Cokken, Jean François Barthélemy (see Kocken, Jean François Barthélemy)   
Cola, Alberto
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20th century Italian composer
Cola, Felix de17 Dec. 1906
Cape Town, South Africa
25 Apr. 1983
Los Angeles, USA
composer, author and entertainer who emigrated from South Africa to the United States in 1943 and is best remember for being Harpo Marx's piano teacher
Colbran, Isabella Angela1785
Spain
1845
Bologna, Italy
singer and first wife of Rossini who wrote many roles in his early operas for her. She too composed for voice
Cole, AllenNova Scotia, Canada one of Canada’s most celebrated musical theatre artists. Working variously as composer, musical director, lyricist and/or book writer, his musicals, including, Hush, The Crimson Veil and Anything That Moves have won numerous awards. Allen also spent three years as artistic director of the Caravan Farm Theatre in British Colombia
Cole, Bruce
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1947
England
 pupil of Birtwistle who is also a painter and a poet. His compositions include semi-theatrical works and Fenestrae Sanctae for chamber orchestra
Cole, Hugo6 Jul. 1917
England
2 Mar. 1995
England
music critic and composer, a pupil of Nadia Boulanger. His compositions include operas for children, a horn concerto and an oboe quartet
Cole, Jonathan
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1970
Herefordshire, England
 English composer
Cole, Jonathan D.
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1957
USA
1999
Omaha, Nebraska
American composer, conductor, musical director and pianist
Cole, Nat King [Nathaniel Adams Coles]
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17 Mar. 1919
Montgomery, AL, USA
15 Feb. 1965
Los Angeles, CA, USA
jazz pianist, singer and composer
Cole, Rossetter Gleason5 Feb. 1866
Clyde, Mich., USA
18 May 1952
Lake Bluff, Ill., USA
American composer
Colebault, Jacques (or Jacquet of Mantua)
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1483
Vitré, France
2 Oct. 1559
Mantua, Italy
a French composer of the Renaissance, who spent almost his entire life in Italy. He was an extremely influential member of the generation between Josquin and Palestrina, and well represents the transitional polyphonic style between those two composers
Coleman, Anthony1955
New York City, NY, USA
 composer-keyboardist Anthony Coleman studied with the late Jaki Byard and has since performed and recorded with his own projects (Sephardic Tinge piano trio, Selfhaters Orchestra, the Lobster and Friend duo with saxophonist Roy Nathanson) and with numerous other ensembles (Marc Ribot's Los Cubanos Postizos, and duos with singer Shelley Hirsch as well as with Elliott Sharp). He has also produced recordings for Marc Ribot, Basya Schecter and Pharoah's Daughter
Coleman, Cy [born Seymour Kaufman]
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14 Jun 1929
New York, USA
18 Nov. 2004
New York, USA
composer best known for his Broadway musicals, such as Sweet Charity and Barnum, but he was also a successful jazz pianist and composer of such popular hits as Frank Sinatra's Witchcraft and Barbra Streisand's When in Rome. Peggy Lee, Nat "King" Cole, Jack Jones and Tony Bennett also recorded his songs
Coleman, Ornette
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19 Mar. 1930
Fort Worth, TX, USA
 tenor jazz saxophonist
Coleman, Steve
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second half 20th century
USA
 alto saxophonist, composer and producer
Coleridge-Taylor, Samuel
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15 Aug. 1875
Croydon, London, England
1 Sep. 1912
Croydon, London, England
a child prodigy on the violin, born of an English woman and a West-African medical man, who studied under Stanford and was encouraged by Elgar; composed a number of works for choir and orchestra, Hiawatha's Wedding Feast, The Death of Minnehaha and Hiawatha's Departure, incidental music for the stage, chamber works and pieces for solo piano
Coleridge-Taylor, Avril (Gwendolen)8 Mar. 1903
South Norwood, London, England
21 Dec. 1998
Seaford, England
the daughter of Afro-British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, she was a pianist, conductor, and composer. She was the first woman to conduct the band of the Royal Marines, and she also conducted major orchestras, including the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the London Symphony Orchestra. She wrote more than ninety compositons
Coles, Cecil
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7 Oct. 1888
Kirkudbright, Scotland
26th April 1918
near the Somme, France
studied composition at Edinburgh University, the London College of Music, and Morley College where he befriended Gustav Holst. He furthered his studies in Stuttgart, and was later appointed assistant conductor at the Stuttgart Royal Opera House. Forced to return to England before the outbreak of the First World War, he signed up for overseas service, and in 1915 was sent to the trenches in France
Coletti, Agostino Bonaventurac.1675
Lucca
1752
Venice
Italian composer
Colgrass, Michael Charles22 Apr. 1932
Chicago, USA
 percussionist and composer, who has composed many works for percussion and Virgil's Dream for 4 actor-singers and 4 mime-musicians
Colizzi, Giovanni Andrea [Kauchlitz, Johann Andreas]1742
Grudim, Bohemia
1808
The Netherlands
Bohemian-born organist and composer, author of Dissertatio de Sono (1774) a treatise on acoustics
Colizzi, Giuseppe
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1925
Rome, Italy
23 Aug. 1978
Rome Italy
film production manager, director and composer
Colla, Giuseppe4 Aug. 1731
Parma
16 Mar. 1806
Parma
Italian composer
Collan, Karl3 Mar. 182812 Sep. 1871the most important mid-19th century Finnish composer of vocal music. Like many of his contemporaries, he was an amateur and an autodidact as a composer, but his solo songs are inspired works of a wholly professional standard. The literary genre of Lied was a natural choice for him, since he was linguist and an expert on literature. He translated the Kalevala into Swedish in 1864–68 and collected folk tunes. Collan died of cholera
Collasse (or Colasse), Pascal [Paschal Pasquier]bap. 22 Jan. 1649
Rheims, France
17 Jul. 1709
Versailles, France
French composer
Collet, Henri5 Nov. 1885
Paris, France
23 Nov. 1951
Paris, France
French composer and music critic who in 1920 coined the term Les Six to described the group of composers consisting of Arthur Honegger, Darius Milhaud, Francis Poulenc, Georges Auric (1899–1983), Louis Durey (1888–1979) and Germaine Tailleferre (1892–1983), the group's only woman
Collett, Johnc 1735
England
c. 1775
Edinburgh, Scotland
English composer noted for his symphonies
Collett, Sophia Dobson1822
London
1894composer of songs
Collin [Colin] de Blamont, François (see Blamont, François Collin [Colin] de)   
Collingwood, Lawrance (Arthur)
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14 Mar. 1887
London, England
19 Dec. 1982
Killin, Perthshire, Scotland
conductor whose compositions include an opera, Macbeth, and orchestral and chamber works
Collins, Anthony
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3 Sep. 1893
Hastings, England
11 Dec. 1963
Los Angeles, CA, USA
viola player, conductor and composer of film music and works for orchestra and chamber ensemble
Collins, Nicolas
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1954
New York, NY, USA
 studied composition with Alvin Lucier at Wesleyan University, where he received his B.A. and M.A. He has performed as a composer and presented audio installations throughout the United States, Europe, South America and Japan. His work is represented on many recordings and has been broadcast on radio and television around the world. He was a pioneer in the use of microcomputers in live performance, and has made extensive use of "home-made" electronic circuitry, radio, found sound material, and transformed musical instruments. His recent work emphasizes spoken word, and combines idiosyncratic electronics with conventional acoustic instruments
Collins, Sarah
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  studied music at The City University and composition at Sussex University (with Jonathan Harvey). Concert commissions include Sonic Arts Network, The Arts Council of England, Greater London Arts, Bedford County Council, Ashley Slater and The Adenoid Quartet and the Huddersfield Festival. Ensembles range from 2 cellos, through to 5 tubas and trombones with drum kit, 7 strings and 5 male voices, and the European Union Baroque Orchestra
Collins, Walter R.
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  Collins is remembered for his days as the distinguished Musical Director of the De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea, and also for conducting the London Promenade Orchestra for the Paxton Recorded Music Library during the 1940s. Earlier, in 1928, his own orchestra was sufficiently well respected to undertake a tour in Germany, and during his long career he was a prolific composer and arranger
Colombi, Giuseppe16351694Italian violinist and composer based in Modena, Italy
Colombier, Michel
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23 May 1939
Paris, France
14 Nov. 2004
Santa Monica, CA, US
composer of effective film scores who achieved both classical and pop success
Colona-Sourget, Helene Santa (also known as Santa-Colona)1827
France
 composed a string trio, an opera and many of her songs were published
Colonna, Giovanni Paolo
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16 Jun. 1637
Bologna, Italy
28 Nov. 1695
Bologna, Italy
organist, choir master and composer
Coltellani, Celeste1764
Italy
1817an operatic singer who was engaged by Emperor Josef II for the Viennna opera. She composed several arias and songs
Coltrane, Alice [ne McLeod]
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27 Aug. 1937
Detroit, MI, USA
 pianist, organist and harpist. Studied with Bud Powell, worked in Detroit with Kenny Burrell, Johnny Griffin, Lucky Thompson and Yusef Lateef. Worked with Terry Gibbs, 1962-1963, and met John Coltrane during a 1963 appearance at Birdland. They married in late 1965. She replaced McCoy Tyner with Coltrane in December 1965 and worked with him until his death in 1967. Subsequently led groups including Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp, Joe Henderson, and Carlos Ward, while recording for Impulse and other labels. She moved to California in 1972
Coltrane, John (William)
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23 Sep. 1926
Hamlet, North Carolina, USA
17 Jul. 1967
Huntington, NY, USA
jazz saxophonist and composer
Colyns (or Colijns), Jean-Baptiste25 Nov. 1834
Brussels
31 Oct. 1902
Brussels
Belgian composer
Coma, Antonio1560
Cento, Italy
1629
Cento, Italy
it is not known where he received is musical training. He seemed to have worked as a land-serveyor and a book-keeper, but certain is that in 1589 he was appointed as Maestro di Capella at the San Biagio church in his native town. He also was director of the Academia dell'Aurora music school. He published four collections of his compositions, the last one, Sacrae Cantiones, consisting of 36 motets for 1 to 4 male voices, included a Stabat Mater
Comelade, Pascal
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1955
Montpellier, France
 French avant-garde composer
Comes (or Gomez, Gomes), Pietrofl. 1739-1755 Italian composer
Comitas, Alexander [pseudonym for Eduard de Boer]
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1957
The Netherlands
 from 1981 till 1990 he worked as a free-lance pianist, mainly for the orchestras and the choir of the Dutch radio. In 1990 he decided to dedicate himself entirely to composing
Compère, Louis [Loyset]
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c.1455
possibly Hainault, Belgium
16 Aug. 1518
St. Quentin, France
it is hard to trace his early life: conflicting early reports give his birthplace as St Omer, Arras and somewhere in the nearby county of Hainault. There are good reasons for thinking that he may have studied in Paris in the years around 1460, but it appears that towards the end of the decade he too had joined the court circle in Burgundy. Soon after that Compère was in Milan, where he sang in the chapel of Galeazzo Maria Sforza from July 1474 until that Duke was assassinated at the end of 1476. From 1486 Compère is documented as a singer at the royal court of Charles VIII, and he accompanied Charles on the Italian campaign of 1494. The years from 1498 show Compère in administrative posts, as Dean of St Gery in Cambrai, provost of St. Pierre in Douai and latterly as a canon of St Quentin. Of the same generation as Josquin des Prez, he was one of the most significant composers of motets and chansons of that era, and one of the first musicians to bring the light Italianate Renaissance style to France.
Concone, (Paolo) Giuseppe (Gioacchino) 12 Sep. 1810
Turin, Italy
6 Jun. 1861
Turin, Italy
child singer and later noted singing teacher, author of celebrated vocalises or vocal studies
Cone, Edward Toner4 May 1917
Greensboro, North Carolina
23 Oct. 2004
Princeton, New Jersey
musicologist, pianist and composer. For his bachelor degree at Princeton he was a student of the composer Roger Sessions, and studied piano with Jeffrey Stoll, Karl Ulrich Schnabel and Eduard Steuermann. His compositions were "broadly 'tonal' in style, was always well fashioned yet rarely strongly distinctive; while holding interest, it didn't quite project necessity". He was appointed Professor, Department of Music, Princeton University 1960-85 (Emeritus) and Andrew D. White Professor-at-Large, Cornell University 1979-85
Confalonieri, Giulio23 May 1896
Milan, Italy
29 Jun. 1972
Milan, Italy
Italian composer
Conforti, Giovanni Battistia
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fl. 1550-1570
Bologna or Naples, Italy
 an Italian composer. In the dedication to his Primo libro de ricercari a quattro voci (Valerio Dorico, Rome, 1558) he says that he "owes much" to Cardinal Niccolò Caetani of Sermoneta, for whom he had probably worked in Rome
Conforto (or Conforti), Nicola
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25 Sep. 1718
Naples, Italy
16 Mar. 1793
Madrid, Spain
Italian composer particularly of operas
Confrey, Edward Elzear (Zez)
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3 Apr. 1895
Peru, Illinois, USA
22 Nov. 1971
Lakewood, NJ, USA
pianist, composer and bandleader
Congiet, Petrus (de)fl. 1480
The Netherlands
 Flemish composer
Connesson, Guillaume
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1970
Boulogne-Billancourt, France
 French composer
Conniff, Ray
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6 Nov. 1916
Attleboro, Mass., USA
12 Oct. 2002
Escondido, CA, USA
American arranger, composer and bandleader
Connolly, Justin
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1933
London, England
 pupil of Fricker, who also studied law. He has composed many works including a series of Triads each for three players
Conon de Béthune
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c.1150
Artois region
1219/1220
nr. Constantinople
a crusader and trouvère poet
Conrad, Con [Contrad K. Dobe]
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18 Jun. 1891
New York, NY, USA
28 Sep. 1938
Van Nuys, CA, USA
composer, pianist and publisher who was active from the 1920s through the 1930s. His chief Iyricist collaborators were Buddy De Sylva, Joe Young, Vincent Rose, Leo Robin, and Herb Magidson. During this period, he wrote a few songs that became nationally popular. In 1920, he had his first big hit in Margie, the lyric by Benny Davis. He migrated to California in 1929. In 1934, his song, The Continental with lyric by Herb Magidson, was the first 'Best Song' Academy Award winner. It had been interpolated into the Astaire - Rogers film 'The Gay Divorcee'
Conrad, Johann Christoph c. 1772
Germany
German organist
Conradi, August27 Jun. 1821
Berlin, Germany
26 May 1873
Berlin, Germany
German composer
Conradi, Johann Georg  /td>22 May 1699
Oettingen
German composer
Constant, Marius7 Feb. 1925
Bucharest, Romania
15 May 2004
Paris, France
left Romania after his graduation from the conservatory there in 1944 and has lived in Paris since then. He studied composition with his compatriot George Enescu and with Olivier Messiaen, Arthur Honegger and Nadia Boulanger, and conducting with Jean Fournet. In 1956 he became musical director of Roland Petit's Ballets de Paris, and two years later the same year his most ambitious orchestral composition up to that time, the 24 Preludes for Orchestra, was given its premiere by the Orchestre National de l'ORTF under Leonard Bernstein, to whom Constant dedicated that work. Since then he has been constantly active as a composer, a conductor and general activist for contemporary music. Among his compositions are the ballets Cyrano de Bergerac and In Praise of Folly and, more recently, the orchestral piece Hämeenlinna, in observance of the 125th anniversary of the birth of Sibelius. Some 40 years ago Constant also composed music for the television series The Twilight Zone
Constantinescu, Paul
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30 Jun. 1909
Ploiesti, Romania
20 Dec. 1965
Bucharest, Romania
Romanian composer
Constantinidis, Yannis [pseudonym: Kostas Yannidis]
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21 Aug. 1903
Greece
 Greek composer who combines elements of Greek modal music and 20th century harmony techniques. Along with his art music he composed a large number of popular songs writing under the pseudonym Kostas Yannidis
Contant, (Josph Pierre) Alexis
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12 Nov. 1858
Montreal, Canada
28 Nov. 1918
Montreal, Canada
composer, organist, teacher, and pianist born in Montréal, he received his first piano lessons from his mother and continued his musical education with a number of Canadian composers, one of them being Calixa Lavallée. He was the author of the first Canadian oratorio, Caïn, performed at the Monument national in Montréal in 1905. He played the organ in the church of St-Jean-Baptiste in Montréal for over 30 years and taught piano in numerous schools in the region. He composed works for piano, choir, orchestra, and choir and orchestra, as well as chamber music
Conte, David1955
USA
 American composer
Conte, Jean12 May 1830
Toulouse, France
1 Apr. 1888
Paris, France
French violist, composer of symphonic music and author of a method and exercises for violin
Contessa de Dia (see Beatriz de Día)   
Conti, Carlo14 Oct. 1796
Arpino, Frosinone
10 Jul. 1868
Naples, Italy
Italian composer
Conti, Francesco Bartolomeo
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20 Jan. 1681
Florence, Italy
20 Jul. 1732
Vienna, Austria
a very famous and highly respected composer in his time. The largest part of his life he worked at the imperial court in Vienna. In 1708 he was apointed first theorbo player, in 1713 he became also court composer. After these appointments he became one of the highest paid musicians in Vienna, who was able to perform his own works with the best singers, since he could pay them well. After falling ill in 1726 he returned to Italy, but in 1732 he returned to Vienna to introduce some new works. It is an indication of his reputation that his successor as court composer, Antonio Caldara, had to step aside to make place for Conti. Shortly thereafter Conti died
Conti, Giacomo
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24 May 175424 Jan. 1805violinist and composer who led the orchestra of the Burgtheater from 1793, created on 14 March 1741 by Habsburg Empress Maria Theresa of Austria to be a theatre next to her palace, and which her son, emperor Joseph II, called the "German National Theatre" in 1776. Two Mozart operas premiered there: Die Entführung aus dem Serail (1782) and Così fan tutte (1790). Beginning in 1794, the theatre was called the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg
Giacomo Conti should not be confused with Gioachimo Conti (Gizziello) the soprano castrato who came to London in Handel's Italian Opera at Covent Garden and became a rival to Farinelli who was then appearing with Porpora's troupe at the Lincoln Inn Fields Theatre. Gioachimo created Handel's "Ariodante". He was famed for his high notes and the only time Handel composed a high C was for him
Conti, Ignazio Maria1699
Florence, Italy
28 Mar. 1759
Vienna, Austria
Italian-born composer
Conti, Nicola [Niccolò]fl. 1733-1753 Italian composer
Contilli, Gino19 Apr. 1907
Rome, Italy
4 Apr. 1978
Genoa, Italy
Italian composer
Conus, George Edvardovich [Edwin]
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30 Sep. 1862
Moscow, Russia
29 Aug. 1933
Moscow, Russia
pianist and composer, pupil of Taneief, he composed orchestral works, and music for piano and for voice
Conus, Julius
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1 Feb. 1869
Moscow, Russia
3 Jan. 1942
Malenki, Russia
Russian violinist and composer greatly esteemed in his time in his native Moscow. His violin concerto was premiered in Moscow in 1898 and became a repertoire staple in Russia at the time
Conus, Lev
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1871
Moscow, Russia
1944
Cincinnati, USA
Russian pianist, music educator, and composer, who moved to the USA in 1935
Converse, Frederick Shepherd5 Jan. 1871
Newton, Mass., USA
8 Jun. 1940
Westwood, Mass., USA
pupil of Chadwick and Paine, later of Rheinberger at Munich; composer of orchestral works including 6 symphonies, 4 operas, songs, chamber music and works for piano and Flivver 10,000,000 in celebration of the 10 millionth Ford car
Conversi, Girolamo
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fl. c.1570-1590 publisher of the second earliest books of canzonettas (1572) - the earliest having been published in 1567 by Giovanni Ferretti - and the composer of a six-part madrigal, a setting of the first eight lines of the fourteen-line sonnet Zephiro Torna from Francesco Petrarch's Rime Sparse (c.1370), which appears in the 1588 of Nicholas Yonge's Musica Transalpina
Conyngham, Barry
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27 Aug. 1947
Sydney, Australia
 one of Australia's so-called 'middle-generation' composers, a contemporary of Anne Boyd and Ross Edwards. His music is classical with a twist: the influences of jazz, electronics and Japanese culture are always at hand
Cooder, Ry
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1947
Los Angeles, CA, USA
 guitarist, composer and producer
Cook, Eliza1817
London
1889composer of many songs and a regular contributor to the literary magazines of the day
Cook, Will Marion27 Jan. 1869
Washington, USA
19 Jul. 1944
New York, USA
American composer
Cooke, Arnold (Atkinson)
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4 Nov. 1906
Gomersal, Yorks., England
13 Aug. 2005
Five Oak Green, Kent, England
studied under Hindemith in Berlin, composer of chamber and orchestral music, including 6 symphonies, and church music. He was Director, Festival Theatre, Cambridge 1932; Professor of Harmony, Counterpoint and Composition, Royal Manchester College of Music 1933-38; Professor of Harmony, Counterpoint and Composition, Trinity College of Music, London 1947-77
Cooke, Benjamin1734
London, England
1793
London, England
pupil of Pepusch and organist; composer of church music and part-songs
Cooke, Deryck Victor1919
Leicester, England
1976musicologist noted for completing Mahler's 10th symphony
Cooke, Henry
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c. 16161672
Hampton Court, England
English composer, actor and singer. Master of the Children to the Chapel Royal, whose members then included Pelham Humphrey, John Blow and Henry Purcell; composed music for church and stage, including part of the music for The Siege of Rhodes
Cooke, Robert1768
England
1814
England
the son of Benjamin Cooke, whom he succeeded in 1793 as organist of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. In 1802 he became organist and master of the Choristers of Westminster Abbey; he composed sacred and secular vocal works, including a Service in C (published in 1806) and three glees that won Catch Club prizes (a collection of eight was published in 1805). He died by drowning himself in the Thames and was buried in the Abbey
Cooke, Thomas Simpson (Tom)
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1782
Dublin, Ireland
26 Feb. 1848
London, England
actor, music publisher, tenor and composer of theatre music and glees
Coolidge, Mrs Elizabeth (Penn) Sprague
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30 Oct. 1864
Chicago, USA
4 Nov. 1953
Cambridge, Mass., USA
pianist, composer and patron of music; through the Coolidge Foundation, she gifted the Auditorium at the Library of Congress and established numerous music festivals, prizes and scholarships
Cools, Eugène27 Mar. 1877
Paris, France
5 Aug. 1936
Paris, France
French composer
Cooper, George
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18401927American composer remembered today for his song Sweet Genevieve, to music by Henry Tucker
Cooper, John (see Coprario, Giovanni)   
Cooper, Lindsay3 Mar. 1951
London, England
 composer, multi-instrumentalist, and political activist Lindsay Cooper has been a fixture on the new music scene in both Great Britain and Europe since she first appeared with Henry Cow in 1974
Cooper, Paul
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19 May 1926
Victoria, IL, USA
4 Apr. 1996
Texas, USA
American teacher and composer
Coots, John Frederick (Fred)2 May 1897
New York, USA
8 Apr. 1985
New York, NY, USA
Tin Pan Alley composer who wrote the music for Santa Claus is Coming to Town & Love Letters in the Sand
Cope, David (Howell)17 May 1941
San Francisco, USA
 American composer
Copeland, Darren
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1968
Bramalea, Ontario, Canada
 Canadian composer
Copi, Ambroz
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  electroacoustic composer and sound designer who as produced work since 1985 for concerts, radio, theatre, dance, and site-specific installation
Copland, Aaron (originally: Kaplan)
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14 Nov. 1900
New York, NY, USA
2 Dec. 1990
New York, USA
studied under Nadia Boulanger; highly successful composer of ballets Billy the Kid, Rodeo, film scores, 3 symphonies and important orchestral works including Appalachian Spring and Lincoln Portrait, a composer who drew from American's own musical heritage and produced works, sometimes lyrical, sometimes abstract and sometimes fiercely dissonant
Coppens, Claude Albert
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23 Dec. 1936
Belgium
 Belgian pianist, lawayer and composer
Coppini, Alessandro
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c. 1465
Italy
1527
Florence, Italy
Italian composer and organist
Coppola, Piero11 Oct. 1888
Milan, Italy
13 Mar. 1971
Lausanne, Switzerland
Italian composer
Coppola, Pietro Antonio (Pierantonio)11 Dec. 1793
Castrogiovanni, Sicily
13 Nov. 1877
Catania
Italian composer
Coprario, Giovanni (Coperario)(really: John Cooper)
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c. 1570
England
1626
London, England
player of lute and viola da gamba who is supposed to have 'Italianised' his name during a period spent in Italy (although there is no evidence he ever visited that country), later was the teacher of William and Henry Lawes; composer of music for masques, various solo instruments including lute and viola da gamba and for organ
Coquard, Arthur(-Joseph)26 May 1846
Paris, France
20 Aug. 1910
Noirmoutier, Vendée, France
French composer
Cora, Tom [ne: Corra]
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1953/4
Richmond
USA
9 Apr. 1998
Draguignam, France
American cellist, improvisor and composer
Corbera, Franciscofl. 17th century Spanish guitarist and composer of Guitarra Espanola y sus differencias de sonos
Corbett, William1675 or 1680
London, England
1748
London, England
violinist and composer of music for various combinations of wind and stringed instruments, as well as songs and music for the stage. From 1700, Director of New Theater (Lincoln's Inn Fields, London); from 1705, director of the Orchestra of King's Theatre, Haymarket (London), from 1709-48, Member of Royal Orchestra, from 1716, Director of the Kings Band. He spent some years in Italy but returned to London in about 1727
Corbetta, Francesco
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16151681Italian guitarist and composer
Corbisieri [Corbisiero], Francescoc.1730after 1802
Naples, Italy
Italian composer
Corbisiero, Antonio21 May 1720
Marzano di Nola, Italy
7 Jan. 1790
Naples, Italy
Italian composer
Corcoran, Frank
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1944
Tipperary, Ireland
 Irish composer based in Germany
Cordans, Bartolomeo c.1700
Venice, Italy
14 May 1757
Udine, Italy
Italian composer
Cordell, Frank
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1 Jun 1918
Kingston-upon-Thames, England
6 Jul 1980
Hastings, England
a fine composer, arranger and conductor whose work first became noticed through the tuneful backings he often supplied to some contract singers on HMV singles in the 1950s. Occasionally he was allowed his own 78s, and he was also responsible for several fine LPs which quickly became collectors’ items. The cinema beckoned with some prestigious projects including Cromwell (1970) for which he was nominated for an Oscar
Cordella, Geronimofl. 1747-1762 Italian composer
Cordella, Giacomo25 Jul. 1786
Naples, Italy
c.1846/7
Naples, Italy
Italian composer
Corder, Frederick
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26 Jan. 1852
London, England
21 Aug. 1932
London, England
teacher of composition and composer of operas
Corder, Paul14 Dec. 1879
London, England
6 Aug. 1942
London, England
English composer
Cordero, Ernesto
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1946
New York, USA
 Puerto Rican guitarist and composer
Cordier, Baude
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c. 1380
Rheims, France
before 1440French composer, possibly Baude Fresnel 
Corea, Chick
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12 Jun. 1941
Chelsea, Massachusetts, USA
 jazz pianist and composer
Corelli, Arcangelo
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17 Feb. 1653
Fusignano, Italy
8 Jan. 1713
Rome, Italy
the first true virtuoso of the violin; composer of music, both sacred and secular, for solo violin and for string ensemble, the later in a form, Concerto Grosso (the most famous of which is sometimes called Christmas Concerto), which Corelli did most to establish
Corelli Marie [ne Mary (or Minnie) Mackay]1855
Perth, Scotland
21 Apr. 1924
Stratford upon Avon, Warwickshire, England
one of Great Britain's leading poetess and melodramatic authoress of her age known chiefly as a camp figure who inspired E. F. Benson's Lucia. She was also a pianist and composer
Corigliano, John
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16 Feb. 1938
New York, USA
 composer who worked in both classical and rock-music, much of it for television and radio. He won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his Symphony No. 2
Corijn, Roland
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21 Dec. 1938
Kortrijk, Belgium
 Belgian composer of orchestral, chamber, choral and piano works
Corkine, William
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fl. 1610-1620 English composer, lutenist and viol player
Corley, Maria Thompson1966
Jamaica, West Indies
 Corley’s undergraduate work was completed at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, and she received both masters and doctorate degrees in piano performance from the Juilliard School. She is an author, composer and arranger of music for both solo voice and chorus, as well as an educator
Cornacchioli, Giacinto1598/99
Ascoli Piceno
Sep. 1673
possibly Ascoli Piceno
Italian composer
Cornago, Johannes (Juan)
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fl. 1450-1475 Spainish composer actively mainly at the Spanish court in Naples
Cornazano, Antonio [Cornazzano]c. 1430
Piacenza, Italy
1484
Ferrera, Italy
Italian poet and courtier, who presented a copy of his Libro dell'arte del danzare to the daughter of the Duke of Milan in 1455. A copy of this text, c. 1465, survives. It contains a theoretical introduction, a summary of eleven of Domenico's dances, and Domenico's tunes with some additions
Cornejo, Rodolfo (Soldevilla)15 May 1909
Manila
 Philippines composer
Cornelius, (Carl August) Peter
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24 Dec. 1824
Mainz, Germany
26 Oct. 1874
Mainz, Germany
friend and colleague of Wagner; composer of part-songs and songs with political overtones, he also wrote a comic opera, The Barber of Bagdad
Corner, Philip
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10 Apr. 1933
New York City, NY, USA
 American composer
Cornet, Peeter (Pierre)1562
The Netherlands
1616
The Netherlands
organist and composer of keyboard works who worked in the southern part of the Netherlands (today Belgium) in the first half of the 17th century. Cornet was not an organ builder but he did examine organs and advised organ builders
Cornet, Séverin
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c.1530
Valenciennes, France
Mar. 1582
Antwerp, Belgium
French singer, conductor and composer
Corno, Filippo del
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1970
Milan, Italy
 Italian composer
Cornyshe (the older), William (Cornish)
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c.1430
Westminster, London, England
1502
London, England
father of William Cornyshe (the younger), a member of the Fraternity of St Nicholas (or the London Guild of Parish Clerks) in 1480, Informator choristarum at St Peter's Abbey, Westminster, in the 1480s and composer of music found in the Eton Choirbook
Cornyshe (the younger), William (Cornish)
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c. 1465
Westminster, London, England
1523
London, England
composer, actor, playwright, who, with 10 choir-boys, accompanied Henry VIII to the Field of The Cloth of Gold; composer of church music, secular songs and consort music
Corona, Manuel17 Jun. 1880
Caibarien, Cuba
9 Jan. 1950
Havana, Cuba
performer of Cuban trova and composer
Coronaro, Antonio29 Jun 1851
Vicenza
24 Mar. 1933
Vicenza
Italian composer
Coronaro, Gaetano18 Dec. 1852
Vicenza
5 Apr. 1908
Milan
Italian composer
Coronaro, Gellio (Benvenuto)30 Nov. 1863
Vicenza
26 Jul. 1916
Milan
Italian composer
Corradini (or Coradigni, Coradini), Francescoc.1700
Naples
after 1749
possibly Madrid
Italian composer
Corradini, Nicolóc. 15858 Jul. 1646Italian organist and composer
Correa, Manuel 1653Portuguese composer
Correa Braga, Antoniofl. 1695 Portuguese organist and composer
Correa(u) de Araujo, Francisco (sometimes: Arauxo)
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c. 1576
Spain
1654
Spain
organist and composer of music of ricercadas, variations and psalms
Correia de Oliveira, Fernando2 Nov. 1921
Oporto, Portugal
 Portuguese composer
Corrette, Gaspard
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c.1670
probably Rouen, France
before 1733
Paris, France
French organist and composer, father of Michel. The only surviving work by Gaspard Corrette is an organ mass in the eighth Church Mode, published in 1703
Corrette, Michel
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10 Apr. 1707
Rouen, France
21 Jan. 1795
Paris, France
French organist who composed for the theatre and for the church, also works for keyboard and twenty methods for instruments including the violin, cello, bass, flute, recorder, bassoon, harpsichord, harp, and mandolin
Corri, Clarence Collingwood
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18631918Corri was perhaps the most celebrated member of an extensive musical family of Italian origin active in the British Isles from the 18th century onwards. He composed dance music, songs and various operettas and musicals
Corri, Domenico
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4 Oct. 1746
Rome, Italy
22 May 1825
Hampstead, London
father of Philip Anthony and Sophia, pupil of Porpora in Naples, Italian-born music publisher, conductor and composer
Corri, Philip Anthony [pseudonym: Arthur Clifton]
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1784
Edinburgh, Scotland
10 Feb. 1832
Baltimore, USA
brother of Sophia Corri Dussek and composer of La Morte di Dussek (1816) an "elegiac sonata" written shortly after Jan Dussek's death in 1812, but which wasn't published until 1816.
Corri Dussek, Sophia
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1775
Edinburgh, Scotland
1847
London, England
composer, harpist, singer and pianist, wife of the composer Jan Dussek
Corselli, Francesco (see Courcelle, Francisco)   
Corsi, Jacopo17 Jul. 1561
Italy
29 Dec. 1602
Italy
Italian composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque and patron of the arts in Florence
Corteccia, Francesco di Bernardo1502
Arezzo, Italy
1571
Florence, Italy
Italian organist and composer to Cosimo I de' Medici
Cortés, Ramiro25 Nov. 1933
Dallas, USA
2 Jul. 1984
Salt Lake City, USA
American composer
Cortese, Luigi [Louis]19 Nov. 1899
Genoa, Italy
10 Jun 1976
Genoa, Italy
Italian composer
Cortesi, Francesco 11 Sep. 1826
Florence, Italy
3 Jan. 1904
Florence
Italian composer
Cortinas, César9 Aug. 1890
San José, Uruguay
23 Mar. 1918
Córdoba, Argentina
Uruguay-born composer
Cortolezis, Fritz21 Feb. 1878
Passau
13 Mar. 1934
Bad Aibling
German composer
Cortot, Alfred-Denis
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26 Sep. 1877
Nyon, Switzerland
15 Jun. 1962
Lausanne, France
French pianist, conductor, editor and composer, founder of Ecole Normal de Musique in Paris
Coryell, Larry
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2 Apr. 1943
Galveston, Texas, USA
 American free jazz guitarist
Coryn, Roland
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21 Dec. 1938
Kortrijk, Belgium
 Belgian composer mainly of orchestral, chamber, choral and piano music
Coslow, Sam
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27 Dec 1902
New York, USA
2 Apr 1982
New York City, USA
an American songwriter, singer and film producer
Cosma, Vladimir
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13 Apr. 1940
Bucharest, Romania
 Romanian-born French composer noted for his film and TV scores who works in Paris, France
Cosmas de melode [Kosmas de melodie] (Hagiopolites)fl. 740, Jerusalem composer of chants from the Greek-Byzantine rite
Cossart, Leland Albert18771965composer particularly of works for wind instruments
Cossetto, Emil12 Oct. 1918
Trieste, Italy
 Croatian conductor of Lyra, the choir of the Jewish Community in Zagreb, winner of many international competitions, composer and arranger of the Croatian song Fala (Thank you) as a funeral song on the occasion of Tito's death in 1980
Cossoul, Guilherme António22 Apr. 1828
Lisbon, Portugal
26 Nov. 1880
Lisbon, Portugal
Portuguese composer
Costa, Abate  Portuguese composer and guitarist
Costa, Antonio Da (see Da Costa, Antonio)   
Costa, Gal (née Maria da Graça Costa Penna Burgos)
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26 Sep. 1945
Salvador, Bahia, Brazil
 popular Brazilian singer-songwriter and writer
Costa, João Evangelista Pereira dac.179
Proença a Nova, Beira Baixa
1832
Calais, France
Portuguese composer
Costa, Michael Andrew Agnus [Michele Andrea Agniello]
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4 Feb. 1806
Naples, Italy
29 Apr. 1884
Hove, Brighton, England
pre-eminent conductor who raised the quality of orchestral playing in England to new standards; noted composer of oratorios Naaman and Eli, symphonies and operas
Costa, Pasquale Mario1858
Taranto, nr. Naples, Italy
1933
Monte Carlo, France
a key figure in the development of the Italian romanza. As late as the 1920s, he hit his stride as an operetta composer, producing four such scores for Rome, Turin, and Milan. In between, he kept up a flow of songs, pantomimes, ballet music, marches, and piano pieces
Costanzi, Giovanni Battista Giovannino del Violoncello, da Roma3 Sep. 1704
Rome, Italy
5 Mar. 1778Italian cellist and composer
Coste, Gabrielfl. 1538-1543 Renaissance composer
Coste, Napoléon
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27 Jun. 1805
France
17 Feb. 1883
Paris, France
guitarist and important composer for the instrument. He studied with Sor and created a new idiom for his instrument which is quite different from that of his predecessors and in many ways more technically advanced
Costeley, Guillaume
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c. 1531
Fontanges-en-Auvergne, France
1606
Evreux, France
a French composer of the Renaissance. He was the court organist to Charles IX of France and famous for his numerous chansons, which were representative of the late development of the form; his work in this regard was part of the early development of the style known as musique mesurée. He was also one of very few 16th century French composers of music for keyboard. In addition, he was a founding member of the Académie de Poésie et de Musique along with poet Jean-Antoine de Baïf, and he was one of the earliest composers to experiment with microtonal composition
Costello, Elvis [ne: Declan MacManus]
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25 Aug. 1954
London, UK
 British singer/songwriter and composer, born in London but raised in Liverpool, the son of the popular bandleader Ross MacManus. Began performing music in pubs around London in the early 1970s, before landing the record deal that would make him famous in 1977. As a solo artist, and with his band The Attractions, Costello has released a number of acclaimed albums, notably “This Year's Model", "Imperial Bedroom", "King of America", "Blood and Chocolate", "Spike", "All This Useless Beauty" and "When I Was Cruel", and has undertaken successful acclaimed collaborations with artists such as Burt Bacharach, Paul McCartney, Swedish mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie Von Otter, guitarist Bill Frisell, composer Roy Nathanson and The Charles Mingus Orchestra
Cotapos (Baeza), Acario30 Apr. 1889
Valdivia
22 Nov. 1969
Santiago
composer
Cotton, Jeffery
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1957
Los Angeles, USA
 studied with Hans Werner Henze from 1983 to 1985 at the Academy of Music in Cologne, Germany, as a Fulbright Scholar. Later he studied with George Crumb at the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his Master of Arts and Ph.D. in 1989
Couci, (Gui IV) Chastelain dec. 1165
France
1203French troubadour
Coulais, Bruno
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1960
Paris, France
 composer of over 100 television and film scores. His first feature film was Nuit Féline (1978). Other notable composing credits include Microcosmos (1996), Belle Maman (1999), Winged Migration (2001) and Les Choristes (2004)
Coulthard, Jean
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10 Feb. 1908
Vancouver, Canada
9 Mar. 2000
North Vancouver, Canada
Canadian pianist and composer
Couperin, Armand-Louis25 Feb. 17272 Feb. 1789second cousin to François, composed in the same genres as his forbears but in a much less rigorous manner. His harpsichord works (published c. 1751) span the gamut from intimacy to exhibitionism, reflecting the simpler musical style of his time. He was also organist at Notre Dame
Couperin, Charles1638
Paris, France
c. 1679
Paris, France
brother of Louis (1626-1661) and father of François (1668-1733), organist and composer of keyboard music
Couperin, François
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10 Nov. 1668
Paris, France
12 Sep. 1733
Paris, France
one of a large family of musicians working at the French court, sometimes called 'Couperin le Grand'; organist and harpsichordist whose music for the latter was often 'programmatic'
Couperin, Louis
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1626
Chaumes-en-Brie, France
29 Aug. 1661
Paris, France
organist, viol player and composer, son of of Charles (c. 1595-1654). His free preludes for harpsichord are amongst the finest examples of that form
Cour, Niels La1944
Denmark
 studied at the Royal Conservatory, Copenhagen, with Finn Høffding, Svend Westergaard, and Bjørn Hjelmborg. Compositions include orchestral works, chamber music (4 string-quartets), a suite for organ, motets, psalms, a De Profundis and a requiem cantata
Courage, Alexander (Sandy)
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10 Dec. 1919
Philadelphia, USA
15 May 2008
Pacific Palisades, California, USA
American arranger, orchestrator and composer probably best known for writing the theme music for Star Trek: The Original Series
Courbois, Philippefl. 1705-30 French composer of whom little is known although we are told he was "active in the household of the Duchess of Maine"
Courbois, Pierre
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23 Apr. 1940
Nijmegan, The Netherlands
 free jazz percussionist and composer
Courcelle, Francisco1705
Piacenza, nr. Palma, Italy
3 Apr. 1778

Madrid, Spain
born into a French family of dance masters celebrated in European courts his father was the dance master to the young Elisabetta Farnese who would become Queen Isabel, consort to Felipe V of Spain. Courcelle would subsequently have been known also to the future Spanish king, Isabel's son Carlos III, to whom he would be maestro del cappella when, in 1731, at the age of fifteen, Carlos became Duke of Parma. A prolific composer, Francisco Courcelle held that post in the Stecatta Church in Parma as early as 1729, at a time when his precocious works were already beginning to break the limitations of Baroque style in a constant move toward classicism. When called to Madrid in 1733 to be the music master for Isabel's children, it was with an understanding that he would assume the position of maestro de capilla on the death of the incumbent José de Torres. That transition took place in 1738, and from that date until his death in a carriage accident in 1778, Courcelle maintained the post in Madrid
Courroy, Isabelle
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11 May 1956
Longjumeau, Essonne
 French flautist and performer on Balkan flutes including the kaval who is also a composer
Courtaux, (Marie Mathilde) Amanda27 Oct. 1856
Port Louis, Mauritius
21 Apr. 1941
Sinsinawa, WI, USA
even before she finished studies at the Paris Conservatory, Mlle Courtaux began teaching piano, and to compose music which drew the attention of a publisher, M. E. Costil who in 1905 and 1906 published her Marche Militaire for piano 6-hands, Ave Maria for voice and piano, Priere De Sainte Cecile for violin, cello, harp and organ, and Priere De Sainte Cecile, piano edition in 1906. In 1921 she travelled to Sinsinawa, Wisconsion to enter the religious life becoming Sister Amanda O.P. on Jan. 1, 1922
Courville, Joachim Thibault de
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c. 15301581
Paris, France
French singer, composer, lyre player (Courville's lyre was a unique instrument, consisting of eleven strings, was often played with a bow and was modeled after a supposed Ancient Greek instrument) and lutenist who was praised by Baif as the master of the art of good singing. Courville composed a number of melodies for Baif, some of these pieces having been performed for Charles IX. As a co-founder of the Academie de Poesie et Musique all of the music composed by its members were left unpublished; accordingly, there is no original extant music of Courville's
Courvoisier, Sylvie
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30 Nov. 1968
Lausanne, Switzerland
 she started to play piano at age of six initiated by her father, an amateur jazz pianist. She grew up learning jazz at the jazz Conservatory of Montreux, and classical Music at the Conservatoire de Lausanne. In 1998, she moved to Brooklyn, NY. Among her compositions: Concerto for electric guitar and chamber orchestra (1999), commissioned by the Swiss TVand Radio, Balbutiements for vocal quartet and soloists (1995-2000), and Ocre de Barbarie, a musical performance for metronomes, automatons, barrel organ, piano, tuba, saxophone, violin and percussion, commissioned by the Vidy Theater and Donaueschingen Festival (1997-1998)
Courvoisier, Walter7 Feb. 1875
Riehen, Basle
27 Dec. 1931
Locarno
Swiss composer
Cousins, Mervyn1962
England
 English organist, choir-trainer and composer. Director of Music at St Edmundsbury Cathedral and Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral before moving to Wales as Musical Director of the Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod. He has written extensively for choir and organ
Cousser (or Kusser), Johann Sigismund
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23 Feb. 1660
Preßburg, Germany
Nov. 1727
Dublin, Ireland
German conductor and composer. He was a pupil of Lully in Paris, where he lived 1674-82, one of the directors of the Hamburg Opera 1694-96, and Kapellmeister at Stuttgart 1700-04. He went to London in 1705, and later to Dublin, where he became director of music to the viceroy
Couvin, Watriquet defl. 13th century one of many trouvères known from the 13th century but for whom no surviving works are known
Coward, Noël (Pierce)
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16 Dec. 1899
Teddington, Middx. UK
25/26 Mar. 1973
Kingston, Jamaica
playwright, composer and performer; noted for his sardonic wit which he used to wonderful effect in songs written originally to be performed in 'Revue' or in his plays
Cowell, Henry (Dixon)
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11 Mar. 1897
Menlo Park, CA, USA
10 Dec. 1965
Shady, NY, USA
pianist who, as a composer, developed unusual, personal styles, one, the use of note clusters to be performed with the whole forearm on the piano keyboard, another, the invention of an electrical device, called the Rhythmicon, which reproduced pre-programmed rhythmic sequences, and a third trying to bring together music from Western and Eastern traditions, the last resulting in works on a lavish scale. He was the author of the highly influential New Musical Resources and a teacher of John Cage, Lou Harrison, and Burt Bacharach, Cowell is regarded as an innovator, a rebel and a genius, one of the first American composers to be celebrated for the novelty of his techniques
Cowen, Frederick Hymen (Hyman)
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29 Jan. 1852
Kingston, Jamaica
6 Oct. 1935
London, England
pianist who published his first waltz at 6 and his first operetta at 8; his works about 300 songs, some Victorian ballads, others of a more serious nature, operas, oratorios, one entitled Ruth and 6 symphonies
Cowie, Edward
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17 Aug. 1943
Birmingham, England
 painter and composer, Edward Cowie has poured his love of nature, and in particular the landscapes of Lancashire and the Australian outback, into dark-hued, expressionistic orchestral and choral works. A noted ornithologist, he has also used birdsong in his compositions, and is a much sought-after teacher and educationist
Cox, Boudewijn
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1965
Huybergen, The Netherlands
 he grew up in Rijkevorsel (Belgium). He received degrees for guitar, chamber music, harmony and counterpoint at the Lemmensinstituut in Leuven, where he also received a degree for composition (with Luc Van Hove) and fugue (with Christian Vereecke)
Cox, David (Vasall)4 Feb. 1916
Broadstairs, England
 English composer
Cox, Hans20th century Dutch composer who based an opera on The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde and who 4th violin concerto was premiered in 2005 in Rotterdam
Cox, Rick
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1952
Chicago, USA
 Los Angeles-based composer and multi-instrumentalist. As a featured performer (woodwinds, guitar, and sampler), he can be heard on such popular film scores as The Shawshank Redemption, The Horse Whisperer, and American Beauty (scores by Thomas Newman) and on recent recordings by jazz/new-music trumpeter Jon Hassell. He has also collaborated with guitarist/composer Ry Cooder, arranging, composing and performing on the film scores Last Man Standing and Wim Wenders’ End of Violence. Cox’s own scores include Inside Monkey Zetterland and the Corrina, Corrina. He regularly performs in the Los Angeles area with new music, avant-rock, and jazz-oriented ensembles
Coxsun, Robertc. 1489c. 1550nothing is known of his life but two keyboard pieces have survived in manuscript
Coya, Simonefl 1679 Italian singer and composer
Cozerbreit, Isaac (see Williams, Charles)   
Cozzolani (or Cozzelani), Chiara Margarita
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1602c. 1678
Milan
a Benedictine nun and accomplished composer who published several collections of motets and concerti
Craen, Nikolaes
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c. 14451507Franco-Flemish contemporary of Josquin des Prés who worked mainly in Italy
Craenen, Paul
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1972
Leuven, Belgium
 Belgian pianist and composer
Crafts, Daniel Steven
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22 Sep. 1949
Detrioit, Michigan, USA
  American composer
Craig Harrison, Timothy
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1962  British composer, conductor, and performer.
Cramer, Anna
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15 Jul. 1873
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4 Jun. 1968
Blaricum, The Netherlands
Dutch composer particularly of songs
Cramer, Johann Baptiste
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24 Feb. 1771
Mannheim, Germany
16 Apr. 1858
London, England
piano pupil of Clementi, founder of the music publishing firm of Cramer & Co. and composer of a great quantity of studies, sonatas and concertos for piano
Crane, Laurence
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1961
Oxford, England
 studied composition with Peter Nelson and Nigel Osborne at Nottingham University, graduating in 1983. He lives and works in London. He is closely associated with the British ensemble Apartment House
Cras, Jean Émile Paul
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22 May 1879
Brest, France
14 Sep. 1932
Brest, France
Jean Cras had a distinguished naval career, with final promotion to the position of rear-admiral. He was a pupil of Duparc and, within the limitations of his career, a prolific and varied composer
Craven, Elizabeth Margravine of Anspach [Ansbach]17 Dec. 1750
London, England
13 Jan. 1828
Naples, Italy
English-born composer
Crawford, Robert
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18 Apr. 1925
nr. Edinburgh, Scotland
 studied privately with Hans Gal and then with Benjamin Frankel at the Guildhall School of Music. His works include two quartets (1949, 19567), still regularly performed today. Between 1970 and 1985 he was a music producer with BBC Scotland, and a number of commissions followed his retirement including an octet for Glasgow University and a Sonata for the Scottish International Piano Competition. His most recent work is his Symphonic Study: Lunula, commissioned by BBC Radio 3 and performed by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra in Spring 1998
Crawford Seeger, Ruth Porter
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3 Jul. 1901
East Liverpool, Ohio, USA
18 Nov. 1953
Chevy Chase, MD, USA
born Ruth Porter Crawford, her compositions included a string quartet, 3 songs with piano, oboe and percussion and Rissolty Rossolty for 10 wind instruments, drums and strongs
Craxton, (Thomas) Harold (Hunt)
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30 Apr. 1885
Devizes, England
30 Mar. 1971
London, England
pianist and accompanist, editor and composer of music much of it for the piano
Creamer, Henry21 Jun. 1879
Richmond, VA, USA
14 Oct. 1930
New York City, NY
USA
American composer who worked as a vaudeville and songwriting team with pianist John Turner Layton (1894-1978). His compositions include That's a Plenty (1909), After You've Gone (1918), Dear Old Southland (1921), 'Way Down Yonder In New Orleans (1922) and If I Could Be With You (1930)
Crecquillon, Thomas
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c. 1505
The Netherlands
probably early 1557
Béthune
director of music to Charles V's chapel at Brussels in about 1544, and later a prebendary in various Flemish towns-Louvain, Namur, Termonde and finally Béthune, he wrote some sixteen Masses, 116 motets, 192 chansons, five French psalms and Lamentations. Highly regarded in his own day (much of his music circulated widely in print), he is most distinguished as a chanson composer. Though some of his chansons are in the light and witty French style, many are more serious in tone and written in flowing, imitative 5-part polyphony sometimes involving canon; in this they hark back to the late chansons of Josquin Desprez. In sacred music Crecquillon often matched musical to verbal expression, using harsh dissonance to create tension (the 5-part set of Lamentations shows this well, despite its major mode), but his smooth vocal line and command of sonority are equally impressive
[text taken from HOASM]
Cree Brown, Chris
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1953
New Zealand
 New Zealand composer who has a diverse range of interests: solo instrumental and chamber pieces, orchestral works, electroacoustic and computer music, music theatre, multi-media and intermedia Art and large-scale musical sculptures designed for public sites
Crego, Cliff
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1950
USA
 American composer, conductor, teacher, poet and art photographer
Crema, Giovanni Maria da15201570Italian lutenist and composer about whom little is known. He was responsible also for intabulations of chansons and other vocal compositions by his contemporaries
Cremona, Robert (Rob)
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29 May 1956
London, England
 his work has been performed in Italy, Australia, Czech Republic, Malta as well as in England. His 2 CDs have sold all over the globe and he has written several scores and jingles for Capital Radio, BBC TV and Channel Four TV in the UK. Most notably, Cremona's music is used mainly by choreographers in ballet and contemporary dance. He has written scores for Dance Companies from performances at Richmond Theatre in the UK to the BJ's Jazz Club on the island of Malta. Despite enduring kidney failure, a stroke and 2 heart attacks, Cremona continues to work with a variety of bands, most recently he got together four top musicians to form "Out for the Count" who have performed in London venues since the latter part of 2004
[information supplied by Alice Grima (DOBB Management - London)]
Crescentini, Girolamo2 Feb. 1766
Urbania, Italy
24 Apr. 1846
Naples, Italy
castrato and composer of operas
Crespel
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fl. mid-16th century French composer known only for a number of chansons that are extant
Crespo, Enrique
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1941
Montevideo, Uruguay
 trombonist, arranger and composer who leads of the ensemble German brass
Cresswell, Lyell
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13 Oct. 1944
Wellington, New Zealand
 New Zealand-born composer who has been based in Edinburgh, Scotland since 1985
Creston, Paul [né Joseph Guttoveggio]
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10 Oct.1906
New York, NY, USA
24 Aug. 1985
USA
organist and composer of 5 symphonies, 12 concertos, chamber music and choral works.
Creutziger, Elisabet Cecelia (von Moseritz)c. 1490c. 1536
Wittenburg
daughter of a Polish nobleman. During the persecutions, the family came to Wittenberg, where the young woman was married to Kaspar Creutziger, a student at the university and one of Luther’s most devoted pupils. Shortly after, he became minister and teacher in Magdeburg and later, 1528, professor of theology in Wittenberg. Elisabet Creutziger, who was a friend of Luther’s wife, is mentioned as a woman of rare musical gifts and a model wife and mother
Crews, Lucile23 Aug. 1888
Pueblo, Colo., USA
3 Nov. 1972
San Diego, USA
American composer
Creyghton, Robert (Creighton)
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15931674composer of church music
Crispell, Marilyn
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30 Mar. 1947
Philadelphia, PA, USA
 free jazz pianist and composer
Crispi, Pietro Maria c.1737
Rome, Italy
16 Jun. 1797
Rome, Italy
Italian composer
Crist, Bainbridge13 Feb. 1883
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, USA
7 Feb. 1969
USA
named for his grandfather William Bainbridge, trained as a lawyer, later established as a singing teacher, wrote orchestral, choral and vocal works
Cristo, Pedro dec. 1550
Portugal
1618
Lisbon, Portugal
Portuguese composer who was maestro di cappella in Coimbra and Lisbon
Crivelli, Giovanni Battista
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 1652Italian composer who worked in a number of Italian cities as well as serving at the courts of Munich and Modena
Croce, Giovanni Dalla
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c. 1557
Venice, Italy
1609
Venice, Italy
Italian composer of the late Renaissance, of the Venetian School. He was particularly prominent as a madrigalist, one of the few among the Venetians other than Monteverdi
Croce, James Joseph (Jim)
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10 Jan. 1943
South Philadelphia, USA
20 Sep. 1973
Natchitoches, Louisiana, USA
American singer-songwriter
Croes, Henri Jacques de19 Sep. 1705
Antwerp, Belgium
16 Aug. 1786
Brussels, Belgium
Flemish composer and bandmaster
Croft, John
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1971
Auckland, New Zealand
 since the orchestral piece Inventions de l’autre (composed in 1997 but premiered by the BBC Philharmonic in 2002), his music has increasingly drawn on the natural spectral properties of sounds as the basis for harmonic and temporal structures. He has recently begun to focus on the integration of performance and live electronics, as in Siramour, commissioned in 2002 by the London Sinfonietta
Croft, William
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bap. 30 Dec. 1678
Warwickshire, UK
14 Aug. 1727
Bath, UK
organist and fine composer of sacred music, including the hymn-tune St. Anne (O God our Help in Ages Past), and of music for the harpsichord. In his General History of Music (1789) the musical historian Charles Burney wrote of Croft as having, "gone through life in one even tenor of professional activity and propriety of conduct. We hear of no illiberal traits of envy, malevolence, or insolence … the universal respect he obtained from his talents and eminence in the profession seems to have blended with personal affection"
Croix, Pierre de la (see Cruce, Petrus de)   
Crombruggen, Paul van (real name: Vincent Christoff)13 Oct. 1905
Malines, Belgium
31 Aug. 1992
Wilrijk
composer and music critic
Crook, John
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fl. early 20th-century composer of Cockney songs and works for musical theatre including music for J. M. Barrie's 1905 production of Peter Pan
Crosse, Gordon
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1 Dec. 1937
Bury, England
 pupil of Wellesz and Petrassi, particularly known for his music including child singers
Crossley-Holland, Peter Charles
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28 Jan. 1916
London, UK
27 Apr. 2001
London, UK
composer and writer on music, enthnomusicologist inspired by music from the Orient
Crosti, Eugène Charles Antoine31 Oct. 1833
Paris, France
after 1889French bass singer, author of didactic works and translator of Italian opera
Crotch, William
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5 Jul. 1775
Norwich, England
29 Dec. 1847
Taunton, England
first gave public recital on the organ at the age of 4 and by the age of 22 was a professor of music at Oxford University; in later life he was an accomplished water-colourist. He produced a large output of sacred works including an oratorio Palestine. He was also the first principal of the Royal Academy of Music (1822)
Crotti, Archangelofl. 16/17th centuries Italian composer
Crouch, Frederick William Nicholls
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31 Jul. 1808
Marylebone, London
18 Aug. 1896
Portland, Maine, USA
English cellist and composer, he achieved early success as a cellist in notable orchestras and bands and as a composer. most notably for his song Kathleen Mavourneen. In 1849 he emigrated to the United States where he had a varied career as a performer and conductor. Living in Richmond, VA he joined the Confederate Army, enlisting in the First Richmond Howitzers, and served throughout the war. He eventually settled in Baltimore and became a voice teacher in addition to his composing work
Croudson, Henry
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1898
Leeds, UK
1971
Essex, UK
an organist in the North of England. His many admirers in the cinema organ fraternity believe that, had he worked for a major London cinema in the 1930s, he could have become as famous as many of his contemporaries such as Sidney Torch, with whom his rhythmic style was often compared. Before army service in the First World War, he had worked as a clerk in the Midland Bank, but by the time he was demobbed in 1921 he realised that his future was in the music profession. Like many colleagues in the 1920s, he found employment in cinemas accompanying silent films, leading in the 1930s to regular engagements in the best northern cinemas. He made his first broadcast for the BBC on the Wurlitzer organ of the Paramount Theatre, Leeds, on 19 December 1934, and in the following year recorded the first of more than 20 records for Regal Zonophone. In 1940 – partly due to difficult wartime conditions – Henry and his wife Edna became managers of a public house in Leeds. However he did not desert the cinema organ and made welcome, but increasingly occasional, appearances in various parts of the country. In 1945 he worked on a film starring Wilfred Pickles, and was later invited to appear at the Gaumont in London’s Haymarket, where he remained for three years. When the Rank Organisation dismissed all its remaining cinema organists, Henry joined the music publishers Arcadia (who also handled some of George Melachrino’s compositions), and he was later with Chappell & Co. Interestingly some of his most enjoyable compositions were accepted by the rival firm Bosworth & Co.
Crowe, Alfred Gwyllym1835
Bermuda
1894military band-master, orchestral conductor and composer of waltzes, the most famous being the See-Saw Waltz
Cruce, Petrus de
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fl. 1270-1299 we cannot be sure whether he was French or Italian: he was also known as Pierre de la Croix. He wrote a treatise on mensural polyphony, which has not not survived although several of his motets (in a style known as the Petronian motet) are extant. They offer an interesting insight into his notational theories. His motets are characterised by having the triplum much faster than that of any of his contemporaries, while the tenor and duplum voices held long notes, leading some commentators to suggest that these works are for a solo voice with accompanying instruments. His implementation of a greater selection of rhythmic choices moving beyond the conventional restriction of either perfect prolation or imperfect prolation (the division of the breve into semibreves), declaring that any number of semibreves, up to seven, could occupy the space of one breve, makes his notational innovations an important precursor to the development of the Ars Nova style
Cruciger, Elisabeth (see Creutziger Elizabet)   
Cruft, Adrian Francis
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10 Feb. 1921
Mitcham, England
20 Feb. 1987
England
pupil of Jacobs and Rubbra, also a double-bass player; compositions include works for chamber orchestra and church music
Crüger, Johannes1 or 9 Apr. 1598
Gross-Breesen, Lower Lusatia, Germany
23 Feb. 1662
Berlin, Germany
German musical theorist and composer. He composed 71 chorales, of which 18 have received a wide usage in Evangelical churches. His church-hymn collections include Neues vollkömmliches Gesangbuch (1640), Praxis pietatis melica (1644) which appeared in many editions, Geistliche Kirchenmelodeyen (1649) and Psalmodica sacra (1658)
Crumb, George
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24 Oct. 1929
Charleston, WV, USA
 pupil of Blacher; works include Black Angels for electric string quartet and Echoes of Time and the River for orchestra. He was the winner of a 2001 Grammy Award and the 1968 Pulitzer Prize in Music
Crusell, Bernhard Henrik
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15 Oct. 1775
Uusikaupunki, Finland
28 Jul. 1838
Stockholm, Sweden
clarinettist; writer of many fine works for his instrument as well as operas and songs. He made Swedish translations of operas by Mozart and Rossini, among others. His biography reads as a fascinating and even somewhat improbable chapter in the history of Finnish music: the rags-to-riches story of a poor bookbinder's son from Uusikaupunki who became an internationally celebrated clarinetist and composer, whose works were mostly published by Peters in Leipzig, and who met such notables as Luigi Cherubini, Carl Maria von Weber and the budding 13-year-old genius Felix Mendelssohn in the salons of Europe
Cruz, Sor Juana Ines de la16481695
Mexico City
had a gift for writing Latin verse that attracted the attention of the Viceroy and Vicereine. She lived at court for five years and became a famous intellectual. She later directed music and drama in a convent school
Cruz de Castro, Carlos
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23 Dec. 1941
Madrid, Spain
 Spanish composer
Csapó, Gyula
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1955
Hungary
 Hungarian composer now resident in Canada where he is Professor of Music (Composition) at the University of Saskatchewan
Cseki, Kalman20th century pianist, cellist, composer and arranger
Cseko, Luiz Carlos1945
Bahia Brazil
 Cseko graduated in composition at the Universidade de Brasilia and also studied composition with Fernando Cerqueira, Rinaldo Rossi and Nicolau Kokron. He obtained an MA from the University of Colorado, USA, and studied electroacoustic music with Vladimir Ussachevsky at Columbia-Princeton University. His music sits in an experimental tradition, and seeks to establish "interfaces between music, movement, light/shadow, scenic and acoustic spaces, drama and chance." He is the leader of the Oficina de Linguagem Musical (Workshop in Musical Language), his own project, using contemporary music as an educational tool
Csermák, Anton Georg [Antal Gyorgy]1774
Veszprém, Hungary
1822Hungarian violinist and composer who lived in Vienna from 1790, noted for writing in the verbunkos style
Csiky, Boldizsar3 Oct. 1937
Tirgu-Mures, Romania
 Romanian pianist and composer
Csonka, Paul1905
Vienna, Austria
24 Nov. 1995
Palm Beach, FL, USA
rather than following his father into the oil business, he pursued a musical career, and at the age of twenty-eight he formed the Opera Guild of Salzburg, a company that specialized in presenting both 20th century operas and operas written before the 18th century. The political atmosphere in Europe led to the disbanding of the company in 1938, and Csonka fled to Cuba, where he continued to compose, teach and write music criticism. He became a Cuban citizen in 1947 but left the island when Fidel Castro assumed power. His US career began in 1962 when he became creative director of the Grand Opera Company of Palm Beach (now known as the Palm Beach Opera Company), a post he held until 1983. He also worked with the Opera Department of the University of Louisiana and was engaged as a vocal coach with the Lyric Opera of Chicago during its 1956 season. He won $11,000 on a TV trivia quiz show on, naturally, the subject of opera
Cubells, Pedro
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fl. 1532 maestro di capilla at Santa Maria del Mar, Barcelona, Spain some of whose music is extant
Cuclin, Dimitrie24 Mar. 1885
Galati
7 Feb. 1978
Bucharest
Romanian composer
Cucu, Gheorghe11 Feb. 1882
Romania
2 Aug. 1932
Romania
Romanian composer known particularly for his vocal and choral music
Cueco, Pablosecond half of 20th century one of the great masters of the zarb (a melodic percussion instrument from Persia) who is also a free jazz composer and arranger. As a percussionist he recorded in the 1980s and 90s. He is co-director of the Transes Européennes Orchestra
Cui, César Antonovich
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18 Jan. 1835
Vilnus, Lithuania
24 Mar. 1918
Petrograd (St. Petersburg), Russia
of French descent, Cui was a Russian military engineer and army general and a member of 'The Five' who wrote 10 operas, songs and piano pieces and completed works by Dargomizhsky and Mussorgsky He was also a writer of musical criticism
Cui, Jian1961
China
 based in Beijing, a composer of film music
Cuk, John
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16th century English composer who may also have been the sub-provost of Lincoln Cathedral in 1520
Culwick, James C.28 Apr. 1845
West Bromwich, Staffordshire
5 Oct. 1907
Dublin, Ireland
English-born composer
Cumbersworth, Starling25 Jul. 1915
Remson Corners, Ohio
8 Aug. 1985
Cleveland, USA
American composer
Cundell, Edric29 Jan. 1893
London, UK
19 Mar. 1961
London, UK
studied the French horn at Trinity College London and joined its teaching staff in 1914. In 1938, after a good deal of conducting experience, notably at Glyndebourne, he became Principal of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in succession to the deceased Landon Ronald and conducted many student opera performances. He composed chamber music, songs and works for orchestra
Cunelier, Jacquemart le (see Cuvelier, Jean)   
Cunningham, Alice19 Feb. 1909
Watonga, Oklahoma
27 Jun. 2004
New Paltz, New York
social and political activist, musician, publisher and songwriter, who penned a song called How Can You Keep Movin' that entered the post-war folk consciousness through the New Lost City Ramblers and Ry Cooder, though it took her years to assert her authorship; together with her husband, Gordon Friesen, she produced the folk magazine, Broadside, championing songs of social justice and social conscience such as Bob Dylan's Blowin' in the Wind, Janis Ian's Baby I've Been Thinking, Peter La Farge's The Ballad of Ira Hayes, Phil Ochs's Changes, Thom Parrott's The Aberfan Coal Tip Tragedy, Malvina Reynolds's Little Boxes, Buffy Sainte-Marie's Welcome, Welcome Emigrante, Pete Seeger's Waist Deep in the Big Muddy and Nina Simone's Mississippi Goddam
Curci, Giuseppe15 Jun. 1808
Barletta
5 Aug. 1877
Barletta)
Italian composer
Curcio, Stephanie
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  American harpist and composer
Curiale, Joseph
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1 Jul 1955
Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA
 American composer and longtime arranger for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson
Curnow, James
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1943
Port Huron, Michigan, USA
 American instrumental music teacher and composer
Curran, Alvin
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1938
Providence, RI, USA
 American composer Alvin Curran co-founded the group Musica Elettronica Viva and has been active with solo performances, international radio concerts and large-scale sound installations since the 1960s
Curschmann, Karl Friedrich 21 Jun. 1805
Berlin, Germany
24 Aug. 1841
Langfuhr, nr. Gdansk
German-born composer
Curti, Franz16 Nov. 1854
Kassel, Germany
6 Feb. 1898
Dresden, Germany
German composer
Curtis, Charles
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1960
California, USA
 American cellist and avant-garde composer
Curtis, Ernesto de1875
Naples, Italy
1937
Italy
remembered for his contribution to song in his native region of Naples, in particular his Turna a Surriento, a setting of words by his brother Giovanni Battista, and a favourite recital item in tenor repertoire, from Caruso to Pavarotti. He was also a fine pianist and accompanist who played for many celebrated singers including Beniamino Gigli
Curzon, Frederic
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4 Sep. 1899
London, UK
Dec. 1973
Bournemouth, UK
pianist, organist and conductor until the success of his Robin Hood Suite encouraged him to take up full-time composing just before World War 2 broke out. The third movement March of the Bowmen has retained its popularity to this day. Later Curzon fulfilled an executive role guiding the Boosey & Hawkes Recorded Music Library, but that still allowed plenty of opportunities for composing
Cusins, William George
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14 Oct. 1833
London, UK
31 Aug. 1893
Ardennes
pianist and organist of Queen Victoria's private chapel, composer of oratorios and orchestral works, Master of the Queen's Music (1870-93)
Custard, Reginald Goss (see Goss-Custard, Reginald)   
Cutler, Chris
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mid 20th century percussionist, writer on music and composer, co-founder with Dave Stewart of The Ottowa Music Co. a 22 piece Rock composer's orchestra
Cutler, Joe
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1968
Neasden, London, UK
 British composer who studied in England and at the Chopin Academy of Music with Zbigniew Rudzinski
Cutter, William20th century
USA
 choral director, arranger, editor and composer
Cutting, Francis or Thomas
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c. 1660
England
early 18th centurylutenist who composed a noted arrangement of the popular tune Greensleeves and wrote for instrumental consort
Cuvelier, Jean
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fl. 1372-87 Frech composer and poet
Cuvillier, Charles (Louis Paul)24 Apr. 1877
Paris, France
14 Feb. 1955
Paris, France
French composer
Cuyvers, Guy
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1960
Antwerp, Belgium
 Belgian guitarist and composer, noted for his film scores and music for television
Cyrille, Andrew
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10 Nov. 1939
Brooklyn, NY, USA
 jazz drummer and composer
Czapek, Leopold Eustachefl. early 19th century pianist and composer who contributed one variation to the original set of 50 variations written on a waltz provided by Diabelli
Czernik, Willy24 Feb. 1901
Dresden, Germany
6 Jan. 1996
Lammerspiel, Dusseldorf, Germany
German conductor and composer particularly of operetta
Czernohorsky, Bohuslav Matej
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16 Feb. 1684
Nymburk, Bohemia
1 Aug. 1742
Graz, Styria
Minorite Franciscan priest, excellent organist and composer, he is credited with founding the Prague School of composers that represented the culmination of the Baroque movement in Bohemia and prepared the way for early Classicism. It was while he was the organist at the Basilica in Assisi that, in Easter 1712, he composed the Marian antiphon, Regina Coeli, for 8 voices in double choir, organ and continuo, his only work written in single parts. Although premiered in Italy, he signed and dated this composition using his pen name, 'The Bohemian Friar from Prague, Organist'
Czernowin, Chaya
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7 Dec. 1957
Haifa, Israel
 Israeli composer now resident in the United States
Czerny, Carl
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20 Feb. 1791
Vienna, Austria
15 Jul. 1857
Vienna, Austria
pupil of Beethoven, teacher of Liszt; composed over 1,000 works including many studies for the piano
Czibulka, Alphons
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14 May 1842
Szepes-Váralla, Hungary
27 Oct. 1894
Vienna, Austria
band-master abd composer of operettas, dance music and light piano music including Stéphanie Gavotte
Cziffra, Gyorgy
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5 Nov. 1921
Budapest, Hungary
15 Jan. 1994he studied piano with his father and when he was nine years old entered the piano class of Dohnányi at the Liszt Academy. After a promising start to his career he was called for military service and was a prisoner-of-war for several years beginning in 1941. It wasn't until 1947 that he was able to resume his studies and career. He won the prestigious Franz Liszt Prize after which he was widely acclaimed for his performances of Chopin and Liszt and, later, for his stupendous virtuoso performances of his own transcriptions. In spite of wide acclaim, he (like Horowitz at one point) abandoned his career until the early 1990s when he gave a concert in Paris
Czukay, Holger
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24 Mar. 1938
Danzig, Germany
 a founding member of the enormously influential Krautrock group Can, Holger Czukay was one of the pivotal underground figures of his era; over the course of his long, expansive career, Czukay successfully bridged the gap between pop and the avant-garde, pioneering the use of samples and exploring the significance of world music on Western culture
Czyz, Henryk16 Jun. 1923
Grudziadz, Poland
 Polish composer