composers biography : G - Gz
 



If any detail is incorrect or incomplete please advise us, using our dictionary amendment form.

NameBornDiedInformation
Gaalman, Alphonsus (Alphons) Josephus Bernardus
more...
18 Feb. 1914
Henglo, The Netherlands
4 Mar. 1986
Dutch organist, pianist, composer and conductor
Gabriel, Mary Ann Virginia1825
England
1877pianist and composer of operettas, cantatas, piano pieces and songs
Gabriel Marie, Jean (born Jean Marie Prosper Gabriel)
more...
8 Jan. 1852
Paris, France
29 Aug. 1928
Puigcerdà, Girona, Spain
father of the composer Jean Gabriel-Marie (see below), Gabriel Marie's works include the immensely popular La Cinquantaine ("The Golden Wedding", 1887) for cello and piano, for octet, and various other arrangements (entry promoted by Ivor Solomons)
Gabriel-Marie, Jean (or Jean Gabriel Marie)
more...
19071970composer, son of the French composer Jean Gabriel Prosper Marie (see above), director of the Institut Gabriel-Marie in Marseille
Gabrieli (or Gabrielli), Andrea [Andrea di Cannaregio]
more...
c.1510late 1586
Venice, Italy
Italian composer and organist of the late Renaissance. The uncle of the somewhat more famous Giovanni Gabrieli, he was the first internationally renowned member of the Venetian School of composers, and was extremely influential in spreading the Venetian style in Italy as well as in Germany
Gabrieli, Domenico
more...
15 Apr. 1651
Bologna, Italy
10 Jul. 1690
Bologna, Italy
Italian cellist and composer, also known as Minghino dal Violoncello
Gabrieli, Giovanni
more...
1554/5712 Aug. 1612
Venice, Italy
Italian composer, nephew and pupil of Andrea Gabrieli. Court musician in Munich from 1575 or earlier until 1579, then an organist at St. Mark's, Venice, from 1584 until his death. After 1586 his duties included composition. His works are mostly sacred or instrumental, except for a few madrigals and canzonettas written in the 16th century
Gabrielski (or Gabrielsky), Johann Wilhelm
more...
17911846German flautist and composer
Gabunia, Nodar
more...
9 Jul. 1933
Tbilisi, Georgia
31 Aug. 2000
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Ukrainian pianist and composer mainly of piano concertos and chamber music
Gade, Jacob Thune Hansen
more...
29 Nov. 1879
Vlejel, Denmark
20 Feb. 1963
Fiskerleje, Denmark
Danish violinist and composer, mostly of orchestral popular music
Gade, Niels Wilhelm
more...
22 Feb. 1817
Copenhagen, Denmark
21 Dec. 1890
Copenhagen, Denmark
national romantic composer; 8 Symphonies and many choir works; best known works: The Ossian Overture and first Symphony; conductor in Leipzig who worked with Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms
[information provided by Henrik W. Gade, the composer's great grand-son]
Gadenstätter, Clemens
more...
1966
Zell/See, Austria
 Austrian flautist, intermedia artist and composer mostly of chamber works
Gadjiev (or Hadjiev), Parashkev
more...
27 Apr. 1912
Sofia, Bulgaria
28 Apr. 1992
Sofia, Bulgaria
Bulgarian composer
Gadzhibekov (or Hajibeyov), Ismayil1949 Soltan's son and represents the third generation of the Hajibeyov family. Ismayil works in modern music, known in Azerbaijan as "yeni musiqi" (new music). He is an assistant professor of composition in the Academy of Music
Gadzhibekov (or Hajibeyov), Niyazi (1912-1984son of Zulfugar Hajibeyov and known simply by his first name Niyazi, he directed the Symphony Orchestra for about 40 years. Dmitri Shostakovich observed that Niyazi was the first world-renowned conductor of the Soviet East. Niyazi was the composer of the symphonic mugam Rast (1956) , the opera Khosro and Shirin (1940) and the ballet Chitra, for which he was awarded the Nehru prize (1971) . He was also honored as 'People's Artist of the USSR'
Gadzhibekov (or Hajibeyov), Rauf Soltan19221974the son of Ismayil Hajibeyov, Uzeyir 's uncle. Soltan was a composer who contributed greatly to the formation of national symphonic music of Azerbaijan. He is remembered for such works as Caravan, Overture and Concerto. Soltan served as rector of Azerbaijan State Conservatory (now Baku Music Academy) from 1969 to 1974
Gadzhibekov (or Hajibeyov), Uzeyir
more...
18 Sep. 1885
Karabakh, Azerbaijan
22 Nov. 1948
Baku, Azerbaijan
author of the national anthem of Azerbaijan, Hajibeyov studied with Prokofiev in St. Petersburg and, although he became a Russian modernist, at heart he remained an Azeri sentimentalist. He single-handedly established the genre of mugham opera. His grand classics, Layla and Majnun, Koroghlu and Mashade Ibad drawn on the best of Azeri literature. The Cloth Peddler is a lighter operetta which satirizes the clash of old Azeri traditions with new ideas introduced in Baku during the first oil boom at the turn of the 20th century. The opera follows the comic twists and turns of Asker and Gulchora, the former a Westernized oil baron who scorns the customary prohibition against meeting one’s bride before the wedding day, the latter a beautiful maiden whose tradition-bound father, Sultan Bey, refuses to let her out of the house. Asker dresses himself as a lowly peddler to gain entrance to Gulchora’s room, where she immediately falls in love with the humble character of the disguise and not the cocky capitalist who wears it
Gadzhibekov (or Hajibeyov), Zulfugar18841950Uzeyir's brother, he was also a composer and was actively involved in establishing the Music Comedy Theatre. He is remembered for composing the opera Ashug Garib (1916)
Gadzhiev (or Gajiev, Gadjiyev), Rauf Soltan
more...
1922 (or 1923)
Azerbaijan
 Azerbaijani composer
Gaelle, Meingosus
more...
16 Jun. 1752
Buch, nr. Tettnang, Germany
4 Feb. 1816
Maria Plain, nr. Salzburg, Austria
German composer, theologian and physicist
Gaffurius, Franchinus
more...
14 Jan. 1451
Lodi, Italy
25 Jun. 1522
Milan, Italy
an Italian music theorist and composer of the Renaissance. He was an almost exact contemporary of Josquin Des Prez and Leonardo da Vinci, the latter of whom was a personal friend. He was one of the most famous musicians in Italy in the late 15th and early 16th centuries
Gagliano, Marco da
more...
1 May 1582
Florence, Italy
25 Feb. 1643
Florence, Italy
Italian composer of the early Baroque era who was important in the early history of opera
Gagnebin, Henri David
more...
13 Mar. 1886
Liège, Belgium
1 Jun. 1977
Geneva, Switzerland
Swiss composer and an organist of Belgian birth
Gagnon, Ernest
more...
7 Nov. 1834
Frédéric-Ernest-Amédée, Quebec, Canada
15 Sep. 1915
Quebec City, Canada
Canadian folklorist, organist and composer
Gaigerova (or Gajgerova, Gaygarova), Varvara Andrianovna17 Oct. 1903
Orechowo-Sujewo, Russia
6 Apr. 1944
Moscow, Russia
Russian pianist and composer
Gaillard, Marius-François
more...
13 Oct. 19001973French pianist, teacher and composer
Gainsbourg, Serge
more...
2 Apr. 1928
Paris, France
2 Mar. 1991
Paris, France
French poet, singer-songwriter, actor and director
Gál, Hans
more...
5 Aug. 1890
Brunn am Gebirge, Vienna, Austria
3 Oct. 1987
Edinburgh, Scotland
Austrian composer, teacher and pianist
Galan, Cristobal
more...
c. 163024 Sep. 1684
Madrid, Spain
Spanish baroque composer
Galan, Jorge Martinez
more...
Cuba graduated from the Instituto Superior de Artes as a classical and as a modern composer. For five years he was the musical director and composer of the Ballet Folklorico de Santiago de Cuba. In the Netherlands, Jorge continued his work as choir conductor and vocals teacher and became co-founder of and teacher at the Cuban School for Dance and Music in Haarlem, The Netherlands. As a singer, pianist, dancer and percussionist he participates in numerous ensembles, besides leading, composing and arranging for his own ensembles Jorge Martinez de Cuba y Lagrimas Negras and La Sonora de Galan
Galás, Diamanda
more...
29 Aug. 1955
USA
 Greek-American avant-garde composer, vocalist, pianist, performance artist and painter
Galasso, Michael
more...
1949
Hammond, Louisiana, USA
9 Sep. 2009
Paris, France
American composer, violinist, and music director
Galbraith, Nancy
more...
27 Jan. 1951
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
 American postmodern/postminimalist composer
Galeazzi, Francesco17581819musician and composer, the author of Elementi teorico-practici di musica (Rome, 1791-96 - 2 volumes), which is important for its early description of sonata form
Galilei, Vincenzo
more...
c. 1525
Florence, Italy
1591
Florence, Italy
Italian lutenist, singer, writer, and composer; father of Galileo. As a member of the Florentine camerata (see opera), he was one of the first to compose recitatives. Thoroughly trained in the contrapuntal tradition of the Renaissance, he wrote the first literary treatise attacking counterpoint and advocating monody, Dialogo della musica antica e della moderna (1581)
Galin, Samuel Nicolas1828
Novgorod, Russia
23 Dec. 1907
Nachitschewani am Don, Russia
Russian guitarist and composer
Galindo Dimas, Blas
more...
3 Feb. 1910
San Gabriel, Jalisco, Mexico
19 Apr. 1993
Mexico
Mexican composer
Galindo, Guillermo
more...
1960
Mexico City, Mexico
 Mexican composer
Galitsin (or Galitzin), Yury Nikolayevich (see Golitsin, Yury Nikolayevich)   
Gall (von), Maria (see Romana Camilla de Rossi)16641741 
Gallay, Jacques François
more...
8 Dec. 1775
Perpignan, France
18 Oct. 1864French horn player and composer of solos, methods, etc. for the horn
Gallerano, Leandro
more...
c.1580
Brescia, Italy
1632
Padua, Italy
Italian organist, Kapellmeister and composer
Galles, Josep (sometimes Jose)
more...
1758
Castelltercol, Catalonia, Spain
1836
Vic, nr. Barcelona, Spain
Catalan composer, organist and choirmaster
Galli, Caterinac. 1723
England
1804possibly Forkel's Catterina Gallo
Galliano, Richard
more...
12 Dec. 1950
France
 French jazz accordionist
Galliard, Johann Ernst
more...
1687
Celle, Hanover, Germany
1749
London, England
German oboist and composer who spent much of his professional life in England
Galliculus, Johannes
more...
c.1490
Dresden, Germany
c.1550
Leipzig, Germany
German music theorist and composer who was cantor of the Thomanerchor from 1520 to 1525
Gallois-Montbrun, Raymond
more...
15 Aug. 1918
Saigon, Vietnam
13 Aug. 1994
Paris, France
French violinist and composer of operas, orchestral works, chamber music, etc.
Gallon, Noël
more...
11 Sep. 1891
Paris, France
26 Dec. 1966
Paris, France
French composer and teacher of composition
Galloni, Giuseppe Prospero
more...
1811
Piacenza, Italy
1896
Piacenza, Italy
composer of church music, works for voice, piano and other instruments and dance music who was organist of the cathedral in Piacenza. He was the biographer of the organist and composer Padre Davide da Bergamo, and together with da Bergamo and G. Barbieri (1808-1871) the three most productive organist-composers working in Italy between 1830 and 1860 esitmated to have produced a third of all the organ music published in Italy at that time
Gallot, Alexander
more...
c.1625
Paris, France
1684
Paris, France
French lutenist and composer (bother of Jacques)
Gallot, Jacques
more...
c.1625
Paris, France
c.1695
Paris, France
French lutenist and composer (brother of Alexander)
Gallus Carniolus, Jacob
more...
3 Jul. 1550
Ribnica, Slovenia
18 Jul. 1591
Prague
(born Jakob Petelin but also known as Jacob Handl or Jacob Handl-Gallus) late Renaissance Czech composer of Slovene origin
Galuppi, Baldassare
more...
18 Oct. 1706
Burano, Italy
3 Jan. 1785
Venice, Italy
Venetian composer noted for his operas, and particularly opera buffa
Galynin, Herman
more...
30 Mar. 1922
Tula, Russia
18 Jul. 1966
Moscow, Russia
composer whose main output is chamber music
Gambarini, Elisabetta de (Mrs. Chazal)1731
Italy
1765Italian born violinist who as a composer, wrote in various media: orchestral, chamber, vocal and keyboard. She also conducted orchestras, which was, needless to say, unusual for a woman in the eighteenth century. Between 1748 and 1750, she published in London three volumes of harpsichord pieces London
Gambaro, Vincenzo
more...
17851828Italian composer and arranger. Vincenzo Gambaro and Friedrich Beer arranged Rossini's symphonic works for winds between 1820 and 1830 with the composer's approval. The new transcription of masterpieces such as Il Barbiere di Siviglia (Gambaro), L'Italiana in Algeri (Gambaro) and Tancredi (Beer)
Gamburg, Grigori
more...
22 Oct. 1900
Warsaw, Poland
28 Oct. 1967
Moscow, Russia
Russian violinist, violist, composer and conductor
Gamstorp, Goran
more...
   
Ganassi, Silvestro di
more...
   
Gandini, Gerardo
more...
   
Gangi, Mario
more...
   
Gann, Kyle
more...
   
Ganne, Louis
more...
   
Gaos, Andres
more...
   
Garayev, Faraj1943  Faraj is a representative of vanguard music and heads the Yeni Musiqi (New Music) Society of Azerbaijan. Among his earlier works are Sonata and the ballet Shadows of Gobustan (1969)
Garayev, Faraj [Karaev or Karayev]
more...
19 Dec. 1943
Baku, Azerbaijan
 Gara Garayev's son, he considers Stravinsky and Anton Webern as his greatest influences being inititally attracted to Western-style post-serial techniques (as in his Concerto Grosso to the memory of Anton Webern). Later he incorporated elements of Azerbaijani music-making (mughams) into his work. His Sonata for two players (1976) displays the influence of minimalism. His latest works make use of non-musical sounds and tape
Garayev, Gara (Kara) Abulfazogli [Karaev or Karayev]
more...
5 Feb. 1918
Baku, Azerbailan
13 May 1982
Moscow, Russia
one of the most prominent figures in Azerbaijani music. Many consider him second only to Uzeyir Hajibeyov (1885-1948) for his innovation in composition. Garayev led the school of Azerbaijani composition after Hajibeyov's death. A student and close friend of Dmitry Shostakovich, Garayev was also among the leading representatives of "Soviet music" and the first Azerbaijani composer to gain international recognition for his music
Garbarek, Jan
more...
   
Garcia, Gerald
more...
   
Garcia, Jose II
more...
   
Garcia, Manuel
more...
   
Garcia Abril, Anton
more...
   
Garcia de Olague, Martinho
more...
   
Garcia de Salazar, Juan
more...
   
Garcia de Zespedes, Juan
more...
   
Garcia Esquivel, Juan
more...
   
Garcia Fons, Renaud
more...
   
Garcia Leoz, Jesus
more...
   
Garcia Lorca, Federico
more...
   
Garcia Morante, Manuel
more...
   
Garcia-Viardot, Pauline
more...
18 Jul. 1821
Paris, France
18 May 1910
nr. Paris, France
French mezzo-soprano and composer
Garcin, Jules (Auguste Salomon)
more...
11 Jul. 1830
Bourges, France
10 Oct. 1896French violinist and conductor; composer of violin solos, études, etc.
Gardano (or Gardane), Antonio
more...
1509
France
1569
Venice, Italy
printer and composer, born in southern France. He began printing music in Venice in 1538 using movable type and a single impression, as did Attaingnant. His publications are among the most important sources of 16th-century music
Gardel, Carlos
more...
   
Gardiner, Henry Balfour
more...
   
Gardner, James
more...
   
Gardner, John
more...
2 Mar. 1917
Manchester, England
12 Dec. 2011
London, England
English composer
Gardner, Samuel18911984he studied with Charles Martin Loeffler, Felix Winternitz, Fritz Kneisel, and Percy Goetschius. He had a prominent career as a violinist in the well-known Kneisel Quartet, as a recitalist, and as a soloist with leading orchestras in the United States and Europe. Among his compositions are a Violin Concerto, which he premiered in 1918 with the Boston Symphony under Pierre Monteux, the Second String Quartet, for which he received a prize from the Pulitzer Foundation, and From the Canebrake" his most familiar composition and still a standard encore piece for violinists
Gardner, Stephen
more...
   
Garland, David
more...
   
Garland, Peter
more...
   
Garner, Erroll
more...
15 Jun. 1921
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
2 Jan. 1977
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
American jazz pianist and composer whose distinctive and melodic style brought him both popular acclaim and the admiration of peers. Of note, Garner was never able to read or write sheet music
Garnier, Francois Joseph
more...
   
Garoto Sardinha, Anibal
more...
   
Garreta, Juli
more...
   
Garrett, George
more...
   
Garrick, Michael
more...
   
Garsenda, Countess of Provence11911215composer
Garsi da Parma, Santino
more...
   
Gartenlaub, Odette
more...
1922 French pianist, professor, and composer who won first prize in piano from the Paris Conservatory when she was 14. She studied composition there and won the Premiere Grand Prix de Rome for harmony, fugue, and counterpoint. Her teachers included Olivier Messiaen, Noël Gallon, Henri Busser, and Darius Milhaud. She taught at the Conservatory starting in 1959 and is especially known as a performer, performing as a soloist with major orchestras in France and elsewhere. Gartenlaub has composed mostly instrumental works, especially works for orchestra, small chamber ensemble, instrument with piano, and solo piano. Thirteen of her instrumental works were composed for exams at the Paris Conservatory
Garth, John
more...
   
Gaschin, Fanny Rosenberg1818
Germany
 a composer who is said to have been an excellent pianist, pupil of Liszt
Gascongne, Mathieu (also Matthieu Gascongne, Matthieu Gascogne, Matthias Gascogne)
more...
fl. early 16th century a French composer of the Renaissance. Contemporaries, such as Adrian Willaert (as quoted by the renowned Venetian theorist Zarlino) grouped him with Josquin, Ockeghem, and Jean Mouton as among the finest composers of the time. Compared with those others, however, little of his output has survived
Gasparian, Djivan
more...
   
Gasparini, Francesco
more...
1661
Camaiore, Italy
22 Feb. 1727
Italy
Italian Baroque composer and teacher. He was musical director of the Pio Ospedale della Pietà, where he employed Antonio Vivaldi
Gasparini, Quirino
more...
   
Gassmann, Florian Leopold
more...
3 May 1729
Brüx, Bohemia
21 Jan. 1774
Vienna, Austria
Gassmann appears to have been trained by Johann Woborschil, the chorus master in Brüx, the small town north-west of Prague which was Gassmann´s birthplace. His father was a goldsmith who appears to have opposed his son´s choice of a musical career. It seems that Gassmann ran away and after a period spent living precariously in Karlsbad made his way south to Italy, where he may have studied with the celebrated theorist Padre Martini. From 1757 until 1762, he wrote an opera every year for the carnival season in Venice, and was also made choirmaster in the girl´s conservatory in Venice in 1757. Many of the librettos he set were by the great Venetian playwright Carlo Goldoni. In 1763 he succeded Gluck as court ballet composer in Vienna, where he was held in great affection by Emperor Joseph II. In 1764, Gassmann became chamber composer to the Emperor, and in 1772 court conductor. In 1766, Gassmann met the young Antonio Salieri in Venice, whom he invited to return to Vienna with him, and who, based on Johann Joseph Fux´s textbook Gradus ad Parnassum, he taught composition. Salieri remained in Vienna, and succedeed Gassmann as chamber composer to the Emperor upon the latter´s death in 1774. Another Italian composer, Giuseppe Bonno, succeeded him as court conductor. In 1771, Gassmann founded the Tonkünstlersozietät (Society of Musical Arts), which organised the first musical events for the general public in Vienna. This social institution ws particularly concerned with widows and orphans of its deceased members. He composed his oratorio La Betulia Liberata (performed 19 March 1772) because of the founding of this society. In 1774 Gassmann died of long-term consequences of an accident, a fall from a carriage he had suffered while on his final visit to Italy. Gassmann`s two daughters, Anna Fux and Therese Rosenbaum, were both famous singers trained by Salieri; the younger, Therese, made a particular name for herself as a Mozart interpreter. Charles Burney, in one of his published tours, mentions traveling to Joseph II, meeting Gassmann and finding him very obliging; Gassmann showed Burney his manuscripts, of which Burney found the chamber works distinctive and most worthy of his praise (but Burney was either not exposed to, or said nothing about, Gassmann`s orchestral music). His quartets, great favourites of Joseph II, also found favour with Dr. Charles Burney, who wrote of them: ¨It is but justice to say, that since my return to England, I have had this pieces tried, and have found them excellent: there is pleasing melody, free from caprice and affectation; sound harmony, and the contrivances and imitations are ingenious, without the least confusion. In short, the style is sober and sedate, without dulness; and masterly, without pedantry¨. The high regard in which Gassmann was held by the imperial family is evident in the Empress Maria Theresia acting as godmother to his second daughter, born shortly after his death. Johann Baptist Vanhal is described by author Daniel Heartz as Gassmann`s ¨protègè¨.
informaton provided by Sergio Javier Aracri
Gastaldon, Stanislaus
more...
   
Gastoldi, Giovanni Giacomo
more...
c.1550c.1609an Italian Baroque composer. Between 1572 and 1608 active in the Gonzaga court in Mantua, he composed two influetial sets of balletti, strophic vocal dance-songs. He is also author of madrigals, sacred vocal music and a small amount of instrumental music
Gastritz, Mathias
more...
   
Gatlif, Tony
more...
   
Gatti, Luigi
more...
   
Gaubert, Philippe
more...
3-5 Jul. 1879 (but not 14 July)
Cahors, Lot, France
8 Jul. 1941
Paris, France
French flautist and conductor; composer of symphonic works (Cortège d'Amphitrite, 1911; Chants de la mer, 1929; Inscriptions sur les portes de la ville (1934); chamber music; works for flute; Méthode complète de flûte (1923)
Gaudioso, Domenico
more...
   
Gaul, Harvey Bartlett11 Apr. 1881
New York City, USA
1 Dec. 1945
Pittsburgh, PA, USA
a pupil of Guilmant and Widor, as organist he served the Emmanuel Church in Cleveland, Ohio, USA and after that Calvary Church in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. He composed many works, including many for organ
[additional information provided by Terry L. Mueller]
Gaultier, Denis
more...
   
Gaultier, Ennemond vieux
more...
   
Gaultier, Jacques
more...
   
Gauntlett, Henry John
more...
18051876 
Gaussin, Allain
more...
   
Gautier (or Gauthier) (Jean François) Eugène
more...
27 Feb. 1822
Vaugirard, France
1 Apr. 1878
Paris, France
French violinist and composer of operas, oratorio; author of memoirs: Un Musicien en vacances (1873)
Gautier de Marseille, Pierre
more...
   
Gavinies, Pierre
more...
   
Gaviola, Natalia
more...
   
Gavrilin, Valery
more...
   
Gawara Gutek, Walentyn
more...
fl. late 16th - early 17th centuries known by a single surviving motet to the text Per merita Sancti Adalberti written while he was cantor at St. Mary's Church in Cracow
Gay, John
more...
   
Gay, Marie Sophie1776
Paris, France
1852a pianist who wrote cantatas and a great deal of piano music
Gay, Noel
more...
1898
Yorkshire
1954he was educated at the Royal College of Music and Christ's College Cambridge. He soon went into the lighter end of musical theatre, being responsible for the music to many revues or musical comedies: The Charlot Show of 1926, Hold My Hand, Me and My Girl (1937, which of course included The Lambeth Walk, long popular and the subject of amusing variations by Franz Reizenstein), The Little Dog Laughed (Run, Rabbit, Run from this, was a hit and is still heard as its popularity extended into the early part of the Second War) and wartime shows like Lights Up, Present Arms, The Love Racket and Meet Mr Victoria are only a few of these. Gay also wrote many very popular songs (Round the Marble Arch, My Thanks to You and so on) independent of the stage; others were incorporated into films
Gaze, Heino
more...
   
Gazzaniga, Giuseppe
more...
   
Geary, Thomas Augustine1773
Dublin, Ireland
1801
Dalkey, nr. Dublin, Ireland
also known as Timothy Geary, he graduated Mus. Bac. at Trinity College Dublin in 1792. His brief career was cut short when he drowned while bathing at Dalkey near Dublin in 1801. In his 27 years he established a considerable name for himself as a composer of great promise. His output includes piano music and vocal music. His songs were promoted by a well known tenor of the time John Spray (d. 1827), one of the Vicars Choral at the two Dublin Cathedrals: Christ Church and St. Patrick’s
Gebauer, Francois Rene
more...
   
Gebel, Franz Xaver
more...
   
Gebirtig, Mordechai
more...
   
Gedike (or Goedike, Goedicke, Guedike), Alexander Fyodorovich4 Mar. 1877
Moscow, Russia
9 Aug. 1957
Moscow, Russia
Russian pianist and composer
Geehl, Henry Ernest
more...
18811961a composer who was known for his arrangements almost as much as for original compositions and who had strong associations with the brass band world. Yet his best known original work is a song For You Alone (1909) reputed to be the first song Caruso sang in English
Geel, Oene van15 May 1973
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
 studied violin and composition at the Conservatory of Rotterdam. His activities as composer, violin soloist and percussionist range from modern jazz and improvised music to theatre productions
Geert, Octaaf Van
more...
4 Feb. 1949
Alost, Belgium
 Belgian composer and teacher
Gees, Michael
more...
   
Gefors, Hans
more...
   
Gehlhaar, Rolf
more...
   
Geisler Wyganowski, Tadhe
more...
   
Geist, Christian
more...
   
Geist, John
more...
   
Gelbart, Mikhl
more...
   
Gelder, Geerten van
more...
   
Gelinek, Josef
more...
   
Geller, Michael
more...
   
Gellhorn, Peter
more...
24 Oct. 1912
Breslau, Germany
13 Feb. 2004
Kingston upon Thames, Surrey
conductor, teacher and composer: Musical Director, Toynbee Hall 1935-39; Assistant Conductor, Sadler's Wells Opera 1941-43; Conductor, Royal Carl Rosa Opera 1945-46; Conductor and Head of Music Staff, Royal Opera House, Covent Garden 1946-53; Conductor and Chorus Master, Glyndebourne Festival Opera 1954-61, 1974-75; Director, BBC Chorus 1961-72; Conductor, Elizabethan Singers 1976-80; Professor, Guildhall School of Music and Drama 1981-92
Gembloux, Sigebert de
more...
c.1030
Gembloux, Flanders
5 Nov. 1112
Gembloux, Belgium
Flemish humanist, medieval author and composer
Geminiani, Francesco
more...
5 Dec. 1687
Lucca, Italy
17 Sep. 1762
London, England
Italian violinist, composer, and music theorist
Genée, Richard
more...
7 Feb. 1823
Danzig
15 Jun. Baden bei WienAustrian librettist, playwright, and composer.
Genesi, Mario Giuseppe
more...
19 Aug. 1963 arranger, composer, pianist, organist and cembalist. His arrangements and compositions include Organ Variations (4 volumes, Edizioni Carrara, Bergamo, 1998-2006), 40 sacred motets for 1 to 4 voices and organ (in Latin), Mélodies for voice and piano on English and Italian texts, solo pieces for harp and guitar
Genet, Elzear (see Carpentras)   
Genetz, Emil1852
Finland
1930Finnish choral composer
Genin, Philippe Auguste
more...
   
Génin, Pierre Agricole
more...
1832
Avignon, France
1903he won his premier prix for flute in 1861 from the Conservatoire and had a successful career as both flautist and composer in and around Paris from that point forward
Genlis, Stephanie-Felicite1746
France
1830a noted harpist who composed and published many works
Gentile, Ada
more...
   
Gentili, Giorgio
more...
   
Genzmer, Harald
more...
   
George-Hainl, François (Georges)
more...
16 Nov. 1807
Issoire, Puy de Dôme, France
2/3 Jun. 1873
Paris, France
French composer of orchestral works; author of De la musique à Lyon deupis 1713 jusqu'à 1852
Geraedts, Jaap
more...
   
Gerard, Henri Philippe
more...
   
Gerars de Valenciennes
more...
fl. 13th century singer and possibly composer of chansons
Gerarde, Theodoricus
more...
   
Gerardus á Salice Flandrus
more...
fl. second half 15th century Flemish musician and possibly composer
Gerber, Heinrich Nicolaus
more...
   
Gerber, Rene
more...
   
Gerhard, Roberto
more...
   
Gerhardt, Fritz
more...
   
Gerhardt, Karl
more...
   
Gerle, Hans
more...
   
German, Edward
more...
   
Germanus, Sander
more...
   
Gernsheim, Friedrich
more...
   
Gerrard, Lisa
more...
   
Gershwin, George (born Jacob Gershowitz)
more...
26 Sep. 1898
Brooklyn, New York, USA
11 Jul. 1937
New York, USA
an American composer, George wrote most of his works together with his elder brother lyricist Ira Gershwin. Gershwin composed both for Broadway and for the classical concert hall. He also wrote popular songs with success. Many of his compositions have been used in cinema, and many are recognized jazz standards
Gershwin, Ira (born Israel Gershowitz)
more...
6 Dec. 1896
Brooklyn, New York, USA
17 Aug. 1983
New York, USA
American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century
Gervaise, Claude
more...
fl. c.1540-1560 a French composer, editor and arranger of the Renaissance, who is mainly remembered both for his association with renowned printer Pierre Attaingnant, as well as for his instrumental music. In addition to being a composer, he appears to have been an innovator in notation of instrumental music: in an instruction manual for the viol (1548, now lost), he is known to have produced the first viol tablature in France
Gervasio, Giovanni Battista
more...
   
Gervasoni, Stefano
more...
   
Gesius, Bartholomaus
more...
   
Gessel, Carl Friedrich
more...
   
Gesualdo da Venosa, Carlo
more...
c.8 Mar. 1560
probably Venosa, Italy
8 Sep. 1613
Gesualdo, Italy
Italian composer, lutenist, nobleman, and notorious murderer of the late Renaissance. He is famous for his intensely expressive madrigals, which use a chromatic language not heard again until the 19th century; and he is also famous for committing what are possibly the most famous murders in musical history
Getz, Stan
more...
   
Gevaert, Francois Auguste
more...
   
Geysen, Frans
more...
   
Gezelle, Guido
more...
   
Ghedini, Giorgio Federico
more...
11 Jul. 1892
Cuneo, Italy
25 Mar. 1965
Nervi, Italy
Italian composer
Gheluwe, Léon (Leo) Van
more...
15 Sep. 1837
Wannegem-Lede, Belgium
20 Jul. 1914
Ghent
Belgian composer and teacher
Gheorghiu, Valentin
more...
   
Gherardello da Firenze (see Francesco, Niccolò)   
Gheyn, Matthias van den
more...
7 Apr. 1721
Tirlemont, Belgium
22 Jun. 1785
Louvain, Belgium
Flemish organist, composer, and an outstanding virtuoso of the carillon, particularly known for his brilliant improvisations
Ghinste, Pierre (Peter) Van der
more...
1789
Courtrai, Belgium
21 Oct. 1861
Courtrai
Belgian composer
Ghiselin, Jean (Johannes)
more...
fl. end 15th/early 16th century Franco-Flemish composer
Ghizeghem, Hayne van
more...
c.1445
probably nr. Ghent, Belgium
1472 or laterwhile many of his works have survived, little is known about his life, but he is known principally as a composer of chansons, and most of these are rondeaux. Two in particular — Allez regrets, and De tous biens plaine — were so famous in late 15th century Europe that they appeared in 25 separate sources, many dating from before the invention of printing, and they were used as source material for many later compositions by other composers
Ghys, Joseph
more...
   
Giaccio, Orazio
more...
   
Giacoma, Carlo della
more...
   
Giacomelli, Geminiano
more...
   
Giampieri, Alamiro
more...
   
Gianella, Luigi
more...
   
Gianneo, Luis
more...
   
Giannini, Vittorio
more...
   
Giardini, Felice de
more...
12 Apr. 1716
Turin, Italy
8 JUn. 1796
Moscow, Russia
a well known violinist, composer and director. He sang as a choir boy in Milan, Italy, and studied music in Turin. In the 1730s, he began playing the violin in orchestras, and toured Europe in the 1750s. He then moved from Italy to London where he was involved with the opera. He also worked as music master for the Duke of Gloucester. In 1796, de Giardini moved to Moscow, but died in poverty shortly after
Giay, Giovanni Battista
more...
   
Giazotto, Remo
more...
   
Gibbons, Ellis
more...
   
Gibbons, Orlando
more...
bap. 25 Dec. 1583
Oxford, England
5 Jun. 1625
Canterbury, England
an English composer and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods
Gibbs, Cecil Armstrong
more...
   
Gibson, Jon
more...
   
Gibson, Louisa1833
London
 a composer of songs and published a book on theory and pianoforte in 1876
Gibsone, Ignace
more...
   
Gieco, Leon
more...
   
Gier, Gerrit Christiaan de
more...
   
Gieseking, Walter Wilhelm
more...
   
Gieseler, Walter
more...
   
Giessen, Anton
more...
   
Gifford, Helen
more...
   
Giger, Paul
more...
   
Gignac, Claire
more...
   
Gigout, Eugene
more...
   
Gijón, Juan Pérez de
more...
fl.1460-1500 a Spanish composer of the Renaissance. He is one of the composers of secular songs (villancicos) who contributed to the huge Cancionero Musical de Palacio, the largest and most diverse manuscript collection of music from Spain at the time of Columbus
Gil, Gilberto
more...
   
Gilbert, Adam
more...
   
Gilbert, Anthony
more...
   
Gilbert, Benjamin Franklin18281894composer and father of Henry Gilbert
Gilbert, Henry18681928achieved distinction not only as a composer and lecturer, but also as an editor and writer whose articles appeared in many journals. Gilbert worked extensively with Arthur Farwell in the Wa-Wan Press. Folk songs, and in particular Afro-American music and Indian music, were his sources of inspiration
Gilbert, James L.  coposer and uncle of Henry Gilbert
Gilberto, Astrud
more...
29 Mar. 1940
Bahia, Brazil
 João Gilberto's wife, when she shot to fame with the English version of Garota de Ipanema (Jobim/V.Moraes), her debut as a professional singer. In the 1970s, after the end of her marriage, she began composing
Gilberto, João
more...
10 Jun. 1931
Juazeiro, Bahia, Brazil
 Grammy Award-winning Brazilian singer and guitarist. He is credited with having created the bossa nova beat and is known as the 'Father of Bossa Nova'. His seminal recordings, including many songs by Antonio Carlos Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes, established the new musical genre in the late 1950s
Gilfert, Charles
more...
   
Gilles, Jean
more...
   
Gillespie, Dizzy
more...
   
Gillet, Ernest
more...
   
Gillis, Don
more...
   
Gilse, Jan van
more...
   
Gilson, Paul
more...
   
Gimenez, Jeronimo
more...
   
Gimenez Manjon, Antonio
more...
   
Ginastera, Alberto Evaristo
more...
12 Apr. 1916
Buenos Aires, Argentina
25 Jun. 1983
Geneva, Switzerland
widely regarded as one of the most important and original South American composer of the 20th-century, this Argentinean composer gained national recognition after the performance of an Orchestral Suite from his Ballet Panambi (1937) at the Teatro Colon. He achieved this prominence even before completing his musical studies. He gained international acclaim with the performance of his Second String Quartet by the Juilliard Quartet in Washington, D.C. in 1958
Gines Perez, Juan
more...
   
Gines, Teodorafl. 1600
Cuba
 of African descent, she was a Dominican nun. She is credited with being the mother of modern Cuban folkloric music
Ginsberg, Allen
more...
   
Giordani, Giuseppe
more...
   
Giordani, Tommaso
more...
c.17331806composer of songs who wrote for performances at the Vauxhall Gardens, London
Giordano, Umberto
more...
   
Giorginakis, Kiriakos
more...
1950
Athens, Greece
1989
Athens, Greece
Greek composer and guitarist, who studied architecture and journalism in Italy and guitar in the National Conservatory of Athens with Dimitri Fampas
Giornovichi, Giovanni
more...
   
Giosa, Nicola de3 May 1819
Bari, Italy
7 Jul. 1885
Bari, Italy
Italian composer
Giovannelli, Ruggiero
more...
   
Gippenbusch, Jacob
more...
   
Giraldo, Ricardo
more...
1971
Colombia, South America
 composer in residence for the Residentie Orkest in The Hague, The Netherlands from 2001 until 2006, and independent experimental video maker. His pieces and works have been widely played and showned in many countries and festivals
[information provided by the composer]
Giramo, Pietro Antonio
more...
   
Girard, Narcisse
more...
27 Jan. 1797
Mantes, Seine et Oise, France
17 Jan. 1860French violinist, conductor and composer of operas and instrumental music
Giraud, Suzanne
more...
   
Giraut de Bornelh
more...
c.1130
Bourney, Limousin
1215also known as Guiraut de Bornelh and Giraut de Borneil, troubadour, born to a lower class family who is credited with the formalisation, if not the invention, of the "light" style, or trobar leu. About 90 of his poems and four of his melodies survive
Girolami, Girolamo18th century19th centurynothing is known of Girolami's life, except for the abbreviation Mod:se (itself almost illegible) appended to his name by the copyist of the score. This can be read as meaning Modenese, but no musician by that name has been traced in the Modena area
Girona, Cerveri de
more...
   
Gismonti, Egberto
more...
   
Gistelinck, Elias
more...
27 May 1935
Beveren aan de Leie, Belgium
25 Mar. 2005
Flemish composer whose composition style blends elements of contemporary classical music and jazz
Gistelinck, Peter
more...
  Belgian music producer, composer and arranger, son of the above
Gistau, Salvador Castro de
more...
c.1770
possibly Madrid, Spain
 guitarist, teacher and composer who became the editor of the Parisian music magazine Journal de Musique Etrangére pour la Guitare ou Lyre
Giuffre, Jimmy
more...
26 Apr. 1921
Dallas, Texas, USA
24 Apr. 2008
Pittsfield, Mass., USA
American jazz composer, arranger and saxophone and clarinet player
Giuliani, Antonio Maria
more...
17 Aug. 1739
Ravenna, Italy
21 Feb. 1831
Modena, Italy
Italian composer known for a concerto for two mandolines
[entry prompted by Philippe Watel]
Giuliani, Francesco
more...
17th century
Arzingnano, nr. Vicenza, Italy
 Italian composer called 'Il Cerato'
Giuliani, Giovanni Francesco
more...
c.1760
Livorno, Italy
after 1818
Florence, Italy
Italian composer of works for mandoline
Giuliani, Mauro Giuseppe Sergio Pantaleo
more...
27 Jul. 1781
Bisceglie, nr. Bari, Italy
8 May 1829
Naples, Italy
an Italian guitarist and composer, and is reckoned by many to be one of the leading guitar virtuosos of the 19th century
Giuranna, Elena Barbàra
more...
18 Nov. 1902
Palermo, Italy
30 Jul. 1998
Rome, Italy
Italian composer
Giusti Marietafl. 1612-24 Italian composer based at the Pieta, Venice
Giustini, Lodovico
more...
12 Dec. 1685
Pistioa, Italy
1743
Pistioa, Italy
Lodovico Maria Giustini was born into a family of musicians in Pistoia, Italy, on December 12, 1685 -- the same year as his illustrious contemporaries Bach, Handel and Domenico Scarlatti. His father Francesco Giustini was the organist for the Congregazione dello Spirito Santo. On July 21, 1695, Lodovico was made a member of this Jesuit-affiliated group and succeeded his father in the post of organist on July 10, 1725. He held this position until his death on February 7, 1743. He also served as organist for the Jesuits and taught in their seminary, the Collegio dei Nobili. In 1724, one of his cantatas was performed there, and an oratorio in 1739. In 1726 he presented an oratorio entitled La Fuga di S. Teresia at Palazzo Melani, followed by a Pasticcio in 1727. In 1728, a performance was given of his Lamentations which he had composed with G.M.C. Clari. Giustini was named organist of the Cathedral of Pistoia in 1734 and worked there until his death under another member of his family, the choir master Francesco Manfredini. Over the years, he appeared as harpsichordist in many performances of his oratorios in his native city. His twelve Sonate da Cimbalo di Piano e Forte Dette Volgarmente di Martelletti, published in Florence in 1732, ensured his place in the history of music.
Biographical material from Drake Mabry Publishing
Giustiniani, Leonardo
more...
   
Gladkovski, Arseny Pavlovich21 May 1894
St. Petersburg, Russia
31 Jul. 1945
Leningrad, Russia
Russian composer
Gladwin, Thomas
more...
c.1710c.1799organist and composer, known to have had some of his works performed at the Vauxhall Gardens, London
Glandien, Lutz
more...
   
Glanert, Detlev
more...
   
Glanville-Hicks, Peggy
more...
   
Glass, Philip
more...
31 Jan. 1937
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
 American composer. His music is frequently described as minimalist, though he prefers the term theatre music. He is considered one of the most influential composers of the late-20th century and is widely acknowledged as a composer who has brought art music to the public (apart from precursors such as Kurt Weill and Leonard Bernstein), in creating an accessibility not previously recognised by the broader market. Glass is extremely prolific as a composer; he has written ensemble works, operas, symphonies, concertos, film scores and for the piano
Glawischnig, Dieter
more...
   
Glazunov, Alexander
more...
29 Jul. 1865
St. Petersburg, Russia
21 Mar. 1936
Paris, France
Russian composer who studied with Rimsky-Korsakov, and composed his first symphony at the age of 16. He was a professor of composition and orchestration at the St. Petersburg Conservatory. He earned himself the nickname "The little Glinka." In October 1972, his mortal remains were transferred to Leningrad
Gledhill, John Patric Standford (see Patric Standford)   
Gleissner, Franz
more...
   
Glennie, Evelyn
more...
   
Glentworth, Mark
more...
   
Glerum, Ernst
more...
   
Gletle, Johann Melchior
more...
   
Glick, Srul Irving
more...
   
Gliere, Reinhold Moritzovich
more...
11 Jan. 1875, Kiev, Russia23 Jun. 1956
Moscow, Russia
Gliere was a direct heir to the Russian Romantic tradition, working on a grand scale in large forms: opera, ballet, symphony, and symphonic poem. He formed a link between the Tchaikovsky/Taneyev school and the following generation of Russian/Soviet composers, including Prokofiev, Miaskovsky and A. Khachaturian. His interest in the music of the Ukrainian and in Eastern music led him to write stage works based on the folk culture of the Soviet republics of the Transcaucasus and Central Asisa; in this he was a pioneer
Glinka, Mikhail
more...
1 Jun 1804
Novospasskoye, Russia
15 Feb. 1857
Berlin, Germany
first Russian composer to gain wide recognition inside his own country, and is often regarded as the father of Russian classical music. Glinka's compositions were an important influence on future Russian composers, notably the members of the Mighty Handful, who took Glinka's lead and produced a distinctively Russian kind of classical music
Globokar, Vinko
more...
   
Glojnaric, Silvije
more...
   
Glover, Andy
more...
   
Gluck, Christoph Willibald Ritter von
more...
2 Jul. 1714
Bohemia
15 Nov. 1787
Vienna, Austria
German operatic composer who settled in Vienna as kapellmeister in 1754. He composed his early operas in the Italian tradition, but later, became dissatisfied with mannerisms of older operas, and set out to reform them, putting text and music into a more meaningful and coherent whole. In 1762, his Orfeo ed Euridice revolutionized the 18th-century conception of opera by giving free scope to dramatic effect. In the early 1770s, Gluck decided to apply his new ideals to French opera, and in 1774 produced Iphigenie en Aulide in Paris, giving a French revision. This brought to a head the fierce debate over the future of opera in which Gluck's French style had the support of Marie Antoinette while his Italian rival Nicolo Piccinni (1728-1800) had the support of Madame du Barry. With Armide (1777) and Iphigenie en Tauride (1779), Gluck won a complete victory over Piccini. Consequently, the art of opera was reformed and operas became more realistic and effective. Gluck's ideas were said to have influenced Mozart
Gnattali, Radamés
more...
27 Jan. 1906
Porto Alegre, Brazil
13 Feb. 1988
Brazil
one of the most prominent artists in Brazilian music who managed to circulate easily between the realms of classical and popular music
Gnesin, Mikhail Fabianovich
more...
2 Feb. 1883
Rostov-on-Don, Russia
5 May 1957
Moscow, Russia
a founding member of the Petersburg ‘Society for Jewish Folk Music’ (1908), a group of young Jewish composers who wanted to create a Jewish national composers school. Gnesin composed many significant works inspired by Jewish musical traditions. He played an important role in the musical culture of Russia and was influential as a music theoretician and teacher in the first half of the twentieth century
Godar, Vladimir
more...
   
Godard, Benjamin
more...
   
Godard, Marcel
more...
   
Godard, Michel
more...
   
Goddaer, Norbert
more...
   
Godefroid, Felix
more...
   
Godfrey, (Adolphus Frederick) Fred18371882son of Charles Godfrey I, like his brothers he studied at the Royal Academy and he took over from his father as Bandmaster of the Coldstream Guards in 1863, holding the appointment until 1880. Of his many arrangements, arguably the most popular was the Marguerite Waltz, on themes from Gounod's Faust. His Recollections of Meyerbeer was in Dan Godfrey II's first programme at Bournemouth while his variations for bassoon and (orchestra), Lucy Long was for many years a favourite at the early Henry Wood Promenade Concerts
Godfrey, Arthur Eugene18681939son of Charles Godfrey II, Arthur was educated at St. Paul's Choir School and the RAM, later working as an accompanist, as adviser to publishing firms and as Musical Director in various theatres, notably of the Alhambra Theatre in Glasgow (1921-9). His compositions were varied and included a String Quartet, ballads like A Fairy Fantasy, The Happy Isle, Lord of the Sea and Stand United, the barn dance, Happy Darkies, which was programmed by his cousin Dan II during his first Bournemouth season and a reasonably successful comedy, Little Miss Nobody, produced in 1898 at the Lyric Theatre, which ran for 200 performances and also had a brief American run. Landon Ronald wrote some of the music, but Godfrey was responsible for most of it
Godfrey, Charles I17901863began the Godfrey family's association with military music by playing bassoon in the Coldstream Guards Band in 1813. He became Bandmaster in 1825, retaining that position until his death, although he retired from the Army in 1834. In 1831 he had become a Musician in Ordinary to the King and from 1847 he edited Jullien's 'Military Journal', one of the earliest of military band publications
Godfrey, Charles II18391919son of Charles Godfrey I, Charels II studied at the RAM with George MacFarren and Lazarus and played the clarinet in Jullien's orchestra. At the age of twenty he became Bandmaster of the Scots Fusiliers, moving in 1868 to be Bandmaster of the Royal Horse Guards, where he remained until 1904, from 1899 as a commissioned officer. At various times he was Professor of Military Music at the RCM and the Guildhall School. He adjudicated at the British Open Brass Band Championships in Manchester for many years prior to the Great War (his brass band arrangements of Coleridge-Taylor's Hiawatha and Gems of Mendelssohn were the respective test pieces at the 1902 and 1904 National Championships). He edited the Army Military Band Journal and founded the Orpheus Band Journal
Godfrey, Charles (George) III18661935son of Charles Godfrey II, Chalres III went to the RAM, like his father but did not enter the Army, becoming Bandmaster of the Corps of Commissionaires in 1887, shortly before his cousin Dan II took it over, and then, from 1887-97, of the Crystal Palace Military Band. Later he was Musical Director of the orchestra at Buxton Spa (1897-8) and at the Spa, Scarborough (1899-1909, the years immediately before Alick Maclean's brilliant reign there)
Godfrey, Daniel I18311903after study at the Royal Academy of Music, became Bandmaster of the Grenadier Guards in 1856, holding that position for forty years and taking the Band to Boston in 1872 where it did much for Anglo-American relations, not at their most cordial at the time in the aftermath of the Civil War. The Band played several times at Windsor for the Queen. In 1887 be became the first Army bandmaster to achieve commissioned rank. After retiring from the Army he formed his own band and again visited the United States. He founded a music instrument business, Dan Godfrey Sons, in the Strand. He was responsible for many arrangements and a number of original compositions - marches, quadrilles and waltzes
Godfrey, Dan II18681939trained at the RCM but, unable to obtain an Army position as he had not been to Kneller Hall, conducted the band of the Corps of Commissionaires (1887-9) and the (civilian) London Military Band (1889-91) before going to conduct opera in Johannesburg in 1891-3 prior to giving the rest of his energies to Bournemouth. His arrangements were many and he also composed dance music, marches and songs
Godfrey, Dan III18931935the son of Dan Godfrey II, he studied at the RAM, like his grandfather, and played in the Coldstream Guards Band like his great grandfather, although he was never its Bandmaster. Instead he directed resort orchestras at Harrogate, Blackpool and Hastings and worked for the BBC in its early years, both at Manchester and Savoy Hill, often conducting the Wireless Orchestra. In 1928 he, like his father before him, sailed for South Africa where he was, until his sadly early death, Musical Director to Durban Corporation, thus, like his father, spreading the gospel of municipal music
Godin, Scott
more...
   
Godowsky, Leopold
more...
   
Godric of Finchale
more...
c.1065
Walpole, Norfolk, England
21 May 1170
Finchale
English hermit and popular medieval saint, although he was never formally canonized. He was born in Walpole in Norfolk and died in Finchale in County Durham. His contemporary, the monk Reginald of Durham, recorded four songs of Godric's. They are the oldest songs in English for which the original musical settings survive
Godron, Hugo
more...
   
Godzinsky, George de19141994Finnish composer
Goebbels, Heiner
more...
   
Goedicke, Alexander (see Gedike, Alexander Fyodorovich)   
Goehr, Alexander
more...
   
Goehr, Walter
more...
   
Goemans, Pieter
more...
   
Goethals, Lucien
more...
   
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von
more...
   
Goetz, Hermann
more...
   
Goetze, Walter Wilhelm
more...
   
Goeyvaerts, Karel
more...
   
Goffin, Dean
more...
   
Golabek, Jakub
more...
   
Goldberg, Johann Gottlieb
more...
   
Goldenthal, Elliot
more...
   
Goldfaden, Abraham
more...
   
Goldings, Larry
more...
   
Goldins, Maks
more...
   
Goldman, Edwin Franko
more...
1 Jan. 1878
Louisville, Kentucky
21 Feb. 1956
New York, USA
American bandmaster, conductor and composer, founder of the American Bandmasters Association
Goldmann, Friedrich
more...
   
Goldmark, Károly (Carl)
more...
18 May 1830
Keszthely, Hungary
2 Jan. 1915
Vienna, Austria
Hungarian violinist and composer who composed his greatest work, the opera entitled The Queen of Sheba between 1865 and 1871. Besides operas, he composed symphonies (including his best known work the Rustic Wedding Symphony), symphonic poems and violin concertos
Goldmark, Rubin
more...
15 Aug. 1872
New York City, NY, USA
6 Mar. 1936
New York City, NY, USA
American composer, pianist, and educator, teacher of Aaron Copland and George Gershwin
Goldschmidt, Berthold
more...
   
Goldsmith, Jerrald
more...
10 Feb. 1929
Los Angeles, USA
21 Jul. 2004
Beverley Hills, USA
Jerry Goldsmith managed to bridge tradition with modernity whilst remaining immensely popular in a massively prolific career of film and television score writing. In a period of 40 years he wrote the music for well over 200 films, including The Omen, Chinatown, Star Trek films, LA Confidential and The Planet of the Apes
Goldstein, Gil
more...
   
Goleminov, Marin
more...
   
Golestan, Stan
more...
   
Golijov, Osvaldo
more...
   
Golitsin (0r Galitsin, Galitzin), Yury Nikolayevich11 Dec. 1823
St. Petersburg, Russia
14 Sep. 1872
St. Petersburg, Russia
Russian composer, conductor and writer
Gollenhofer, Josepha Muller1770
Vienna, Austria
 composed many pieces for harp)
Golovanov, Nikolai
more...
   
Golovin, Andrei
more...
11 Aug. 1950
Moscow, Russia
 Russian composer whose main output is chamber music
Golson, Benny
more...
   
Golubev, Evgeny Kirillovich
more...
16 (Old Style 3) February 1910
Moscow, Russia
25 Dec. 1988
Moscow, Russia
Russian composer who taught composition at the Moscow Conservatory. Alfred Schnittke was one of his students
Gombert, Nicolas
more...
c.1495
Southern Flanders
c.1560
Europe
Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the most famous and influential composers between Josquin Desprez and Palestrina, and best represents the fully-developed, complex polyphonic style of this transitional period in music history
Gomelskaya, Julia
more...
11 Mar. 1964
Ukraine
 Ukrainian pianist and composer who has studied in London and at the University of Sussex
Gomes, Antônio Carlos
more...
11 Jul. 1836
São Carlos, now Campinas, Brazil
16 Sep. 1896
Belém, Brazil
one of the most distinguished nineteenth century classical composers, the first New World composer whose work was accepted by Europe
[entry prompted by Szmul Brumer]
Gomes da Silva, Alberto Jose
more...
   
Gomez, Claudia
more...
   
Gomez, Juan 'Chicuelo'
more...
   
Gomolka, Mikolaj
more...
1535
Sandomierz, Poland
c. 5 Mar. 1609
Jazlowiec, Poland
known by a single surviving published collection Melodie na Psalterz polski formed on melodies to all of the 150 psalms (1580, Kraków)
Gonzaga, Francisca Edwiges Neves
more...
17 Oct. 1847
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
28 Feb. 1935
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazilian composer, pianist and conductor
[entry prompted by Szmul Brumer]
Gonzaga, Guglielmo (William) I of
more...
24 Apr. 1538
Mantua, Italy
14 Aug. 1587
Mantua, Italy
Duke of Mantua (Marquis Guglielmo X of Monferrato) was the ruler of Mantua and Monferrato (Italy) from 1550 to 1587. Lodovico Agostini was a composition teacher to Guglielmo Gonzaga, to whom Agostini dedicated a book of madrigals. Gonzaga went on to become a composer of madrigals himself
Gonzalez, Geronimo
more...
   
Gonzalez, Jorge
more...
   
Gonzalez Acilu, Agustin
more...
   
Gooch, Warren
more...
20th century Warren Gooch received his Doctorate in composition from the University of Wisconsin- Madison, Masters degree from the University of Minnesota-Duluth, and Bachelors degree from the College of St. Scholastica. Composition instructors have included Stephen Dembski, Joel Naumann, Mary Mageau, Eric Stokes and others, representing varied aesthetic philosophies ranging from those of George Crumb and Milton Babbitt to those of Howard Hansen and Nadia Boulanger
[entry prompted by Dr. Amy Dunker]
Goodall, Howard
more...
   
Goodenough, David
more...
   
Goodenough, Robert Philip
more...
   
Goodman, Banjamin David (Benny)
more...
30 May 1909
Chicago, USA
13 Jun. 1986
New York City, USA
playing professionally from the age of 12, he joined Ben Pollack's orchestra in 1926. In 1929 he moved to New York and free lanced with various bands such as those of Red Nichols, Ben Selvin, Ted Lewis, Johnny Green, Paul Whiteman, and played in Broadway shows such as Gershwin's Strike Up The Band and Girl Crazy. He formed his own band in Spring 1934, and started out with arrangements by Dean Kincaide, Will Hudson and Benny Carter. In November 1934, Goodman started a series of weekly broadcasts on the "Let's Dance" program, using additional arrangements by Fletcher Henderson. Through radio's effectiveness in dissemination and by touring throughout the United States, Goodman became known as "The King of Swing," one of the most widely-known and significant figures in popular music towards the end of the 1930s. In 1939, Goodman disbanded his ensemble in order to undergo an operation to relieve sciatica. When he reassembled his band the following year, he acquired the services of arranger Eddie Sauter. The war years are considered the apogee of Goodman and his band's career. Goodman was also active in classical music. In 1935, he performed and recorded the Mozart clarinet quintet. In 1938 he comissioned Bela Bartok to write Contrasts, which he premiered and recorded the following year with Joseph Szigeti and the composer. Goodman continued to comission works from contemporary composers, and increased the number of his appearances in classical venues towards the end of his career
Goodman, Paul
more...
   
Goodson, Richard sr
more...
   
Goodwin, Ron
more...
19252003a brilliant composer, arranger and conductor. In 1945 he was appointed head of the arranging department at Bron Associated Publishers, where he was involved in working with the best British bands such as Ted Heath, Geraldo and the BBC Dance Orchestra. Initially Ron’s work in the film industry was at Merton Park Studios on documentaries, but in 1958 his big chance came with a commission to write his first score for a major feature film Whirlpool. Two years later he was signed by MGM British Studios to compose and conduct for most of their British productions. In total, Goodwin worked on some 60 films, and an early success was his attractively spirited Miss Marple music, inspired by the casting of Margaret Rutherford as Agatha Christie’s famous amateur sleuth and originally written for Murder She Said (1962). 633 Squadron (1964) was his first big blockbuster and the following year he produced the score for Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines
Goorhuis, Rob
more...
   
Goosen, Luc
more...
   
Goossens, Eugene
more...
   
Göpfert, Carl (or Karl) Andreas
more...
1768
Rimpar, Germany
1818
Meiningen, Germany
clarinetist and composer
Goraguer, Alain
more...
   
Gorb, Adam
more...
   
Gorczycki, Gregor Gerwazy
more...
c. 1665
nr. Bytom, Poland
30 Apr. 1734
Cracow, Poland
Polish musician, teacher of rhetoric and poetics, conductor and composer
Gorczyn, Jan Aleksander
more...
1618
Cracow, Poland
1694
Cracow, Poland
author of Tabulatura muzyki, albo Zaprawa muzykalna, a simplified handbook on the rudiments of music, aimed at the amateur. Although there are no surviving works known to be by him, it is believed that he was also a composer
Gordeli, Otar
more...
18 Nov. 1928
Tiblisi, Georgia
 Georgian composer
Gordon, Dexter (Keith)
more...
27 Feb. 1923
Los Angeles, California
25 Apr. 1990
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
an American tenor saxophonist and actor. He is considered one of the first bebop tenor players. From 1940 to 1980, he played with such jazz greats as Lionel Hampton, Tadd Dameron, Charles Mingus, Louis Armstrong and Billy Eckstine. He also played with the Fletcher Henderson band in L.A. for a few weeks in 1947
Gordon, Michael I
more...
   
Gordon, Peter
more...
   
Gore, Michael
more...
   
Gorecki, Henryk Mikolaj
more...
6 Dec. 1933
Czernica near Rybnik, Poland
12 Nov. 2010
Poland
studied composition with Boleslaw Szabelski at the State Higher School of Music (PWSM) in Katowice (1955-1960). After a post-graduate sojourn in Paris, he became a professor of composition at the PWSM in Katowice, and-- in 1975-1979--its Rector. As a composer, he has been known and respected in Poland, but not well-known around the world. The phenomenal success of his Symphony no. 3 (Gramophone's"Best-selling CD in 1993") has astounded many of his contemporaries, especially in Poland, where the work had been known for more than a decade. In his home country Górecki's Third was perceived as one of a series of fascinating compositions, the result of a long and complex creative evolution
Gorelova, Galina
more...
1951
Minsk, Belarus
 Belarusian composer of orchestral, chamber, choral, vocal, and piano works. She co-founded with Sergey Beltiukov, Vyacheslav Kuznetsov, Dmitry Lybin, Yevgeny Poplavsky, and others the Belarusian Society for Contemporary Music in 1990. She has taught composition, orchestral history and polyphony at the Belarusian Academy of Music in Minsk since 1980
Goring Thomas, Arthur
more...
10 Nov. 1850
Ratton Park, Sussex, UK
20 Mar 1892
London, UK
best known for the popular song O Vision Entrancing, Goring Thomas occupies a distinct place among English composers of the 19th-century. His music, which shows traces of his early French training, reveals a great talent for dramatic composition and a real gift of refined and beautiful melody. Personally the most amiable of men, he was most critical of his own work, never attempting anything for which he felt he was unfitted, and constantly revising and rewriting his compositions
Gorne, Annette Vande (see Vande Gorne, Annette)   
Gorner, Johann Valentin
more...
   
Gorney, Jay
more...
   
Gosfield, Annie
more...
   
Goshev, Jordan
more...
   
Goss, John
more...
27 Dec. 1800, Fareham, England10 May 1880an English organist and composer who studied under Thomas Attwood. He succeeded Attwood as organist at St Pauls Cathedral in 1838. Goss' own pupils included Arthur Sullivan. As a composer he is best remembered for his Anglican church music and glees
Goss-Custard, Reginald18771956
Dorking, Surrey, UK
a native of St. Leonards and largely self taught, the composer Reginald Goss-Custard was successively organist of St. Margaret's Westminster and St. Michael's Chester Square. He was also organist for many years at the Bishopsgate Institute, where his two weekly recitals formed the basis of his reputation as a concert organist rather than as a church musician. On the advice of Cunningham, Goss-Custard was appointed as Organist of the Alexandra Palace after the 1929 restoration of the organ
Gossec, Francois-Joseph
more...
1734
Vergnies, Belgium
16 Feb. 1829
Passy, France
Belgian composer of operas, string quartets, symphonies, and choral works who worked in France
Gosyn, Benjamin
more...
   
Gothóni, Ralf1946
Finland
 pianist and composer. His small early output consists mostly of vocal works. His first work to attain wider attraction was the chamber opera Ihmeellinen viesti toiselta tähdeltä (Strange News from Another Star, 1984), based on a story by Herman Hesse. The TV opera Hund (Hound, 1995) features the Russian Mafia. Another important work is the Zen-Buddhist cantata Härkä ja hänen paimenensa (The Ox and His Herder, 1992), which Gothóni has adapted into a concerto grosso entitled Härkä ja paimen (The Ox and the Herder, 1999) for violin, piano and strings
Gotkovsky, Ida
more...
   
Gotovac, Jakov18951982Croatian composer. His opera Ero s onoga svijeta, which has been translated into 9 languages, has been and performed in more than 80 countries
Gottschalk, Clara1837
USA
 produced a large amount of piano music
Gottschalk, Gunda
more...
   
Gottschalk, Louis Moreau
more...
   
Gottsche, Gunther Martin
more...
   
Gottwald, Clytus
more...
   
Gotz, Hermann
more...
   
Goublier, Henri
more...
   
Goudbeek, Andre
more...
   
Goudimel, Claude
more...
c.1514 to 1520
Besançon, France
between 28-31 Aug. 1572
Lyon, France
a French composer, music editor and publisher, and music theorist of the Renaissance who was murdered in Lyon sometime between August 28 and 31, 1572, during the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, along with much of the Huguenot population of the city
Gouffet, Jean Baptiste
more...
   
Gougeon, Denis
more...
   
Gougelet, Mme. H.  published piano music and methods in Paris, 1771
Gouinguene, Christian
more...
   
Gould, Glenn
more...
   
Gould, Morton
more...
10 Dec 1913
Richmond Hill, New York, USA
21 Feb 1996
Orlando, Florida, USA
one of the most highly respected American composers, and among his best-known works were the ballet Fall River Legend and American Symphonette No. 3, which became better known as Pavanne (the mis-spelling was deliberate). His American Salute (based on When Johnny Comes Marching Home) also caught the public’s attention. From 1986 to 1994 Gould was President of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)
Gounod, Charles-(François)
more...
17 Jun. 1818
Paris, France
18 Oct. 1893
St. Cloud, France
French composer of opera, of a new national anthem Vive l'Empereur in honor of Napoleon III and of the ever-popular Ave Maria
Gouvy, Louis Théodore
more...
3 Jul, 1819
Goffontaine, France
21 Apr. 1898
Leipzig, Germany
French composer
Goves, Larry
more...
1980
Cardiff, Wales
 a British composer
Gowers, Patrick
more...
5 May 1936
London, England
 Patrick Gowers' relatively small output includes several virtuoso works for the organ, music for the Three Choirs Festival, and a guitar concerto for John Williams. He is perhaps most widely known for his film scores, including those for a memorable series of Sherlock Holmes stories for television
Gowland, Stephen
more...
   
Goykovich, Dusko
more...
   
Graaff, Huba de
more...
   
Graap, Lothar
more...
   
Grabbe, Johann
more...
   
Grabowska, Countess Clementine1771
Poland
 
Paris, France
pianist and composer
Graettinger, Bob
more...
   
Graever, Johanna Magdalena
more...
   
Graever, Johanna Magdalena (Madeleine)1830
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
 a composer and concert pianist who went to New York in 1860 and was well received. Appointed court pianist to the Queen of Belgium in 1862
Graewe, Georg
more...
   
Graf, Christiaan Ernst
more...
   
Graf, Friedrich Hartmann
more...
   
Gragnani, Filippo
more...
1767
Livorno, Italy
c.1812
Paris, France
Gragnani came from Livorno, Italy, from a family of instrument builders and musicians, trained as a violinist, thus the many violinistic effects in his music. He later devoted himself to guitar, visited Germany, and settled in Paris where he became good friends with Carulli. Gragnani dedicated 3 duets to Carulli. Gragnani was particularly talented with chamber music, thus the duets, trios, and works for violin and guitar are among the finest
Graham, Peter (pseudonym of Jaroslav Stastny-Pokorny)
more...
1 Jul 1952
Brno
 studied organ at the Brno Conservatory, from where he went on studying composition under Alois Pinos at the Janacek Academy of Performing Arts (JAMU), also in Brno. After completing his studies he worked temporarily in quite a number of capacities - as an accompanist at the Conservatory, in theatre, as as a music director in radio, as an employee of the Czech Music Fund, as a music school teacher, music editor in the Czech TV in Brno. At present he is professor at JAMU, Brno and artistic director of Exposition of New Music Festival. His greatest interest, however, is in composition. Graham says of his own music, that it "grows as does timber in a forest", without predetermined plans and goals. He is concerned with creation itself rather than with the cultivation of the personality: " I am what I do." Several of his works have met with success at performances in Great Britain, Germany, Poland, Austria, Italy, Romania, Holland, Sweden, France and USA. In 1993 his chamber cantata Der Erste gained him second prize in the Musica iudaica festival s international competition for works on texts by Franz Kafka
Grain [du Grain, Dügren], Jean [Johann Jeremias] dufl. 174019 Jan. 1756
possibly Gdansk
Grainer, Ron
more...
   
Grainger, Percy
more...
8 Jul. 1882
Brighton, Australia
20 Feb. 1961
New York City, USA
Australian-born pianist, composer, and champion of the saxophone and the Concert band
Granados y Campiña, Enrique Costanzo
more...
27 Jul. 1867
Lleida, Spain
24 Mar. 1916
English Channel
Spanish composer and pianist of classical music; he is commonly considered to be a representative of musical Nationalism, and as such his music is in a uniquely Spanish style. He was also a talented painter in the style of Goya
Granata, Giovanni Battista
more...
   
Granda, Chabuca
more...
   
Grandi, Alessandro
more...
   
Grandjany, Marcel
more...
   
Grandval, Nicolas Racot de
more...
   
Granichstaedten, Bruno
more...
   
Grannis, S
more...
   
Grant, Quentin
more...
   
Grappelli, Stephane
more...
   
Grapsas, Nikos
more...
   
Gräsbeck, Gottfrid
more...
15 Feb. 1927
Finland
 the early stage in his career is represented by the small orchestral work Toccata dodecafonica (1959), the Concerto for two tape recorders and orchestra (1964) and the staged cantata Stämmor ur elementer (Voices from the Elements, 1965) for male voice choir, male voice quartet, tape, six projectors and dancers. In the late 1960s, Gräsbeck began to turn towards a more traditional free-tonal idiom. His later work consists mostly of relatively simple and archaic choral works, but he has also written orchestral music and concertos. Gräsbeck is closely connected with choral music, having had a long career as a choral conductor
Gratton, Hector
more...
   
Grau, Augustine
more...
  Catalonian composer who was a friend of Emilio Pujol
Grau, Durand de
more...
   
Graun, Carl Heinrich
more...
7 May 1704
Wahrenbrück, Germany
8 Aug. 1759
Berlin, Germany
a German composer and tenor singer. Along with Johann Adolf Hasse, he is considered to be the most important German composer of Italian opera of his time
Graun, Johann Gottlieb
more...
27 Oct. 1703
Wahrenbrück, Germany
28 Oct. 1771a German Baroque/Classical era composer and violinist
Graupner, (Johann) Christoph
more...
13 Jan. 1683
Hartmanndorf, Germany
10 Mar. 1760
Darmstadt, Germany
German harpsichordist and composer of high Baroque music who lived and worked at the same time as Johann Sebastian Bach, Georg Philipp Telemann and George Frideric Handel
Graves, John
more...
19161997 
Gray, Allan
more...
   
Graziani, Bonifatio
more...
   
Graziani, Tomaso
more...
   
Grazioli, Giovanni Battista
more...
   
Grazianini (Gratianini), Caterina Benedictafl. early 1700s
Italy
 composer
Grechaninov (or Grechaninoff, Gretchaninov, Grecsanyinov, Gretschaninow, Gretschaninoff, Gretsjaninov, Gretjaninov), Alexander Tikhonovich25 Oct. 1864
Moscow, Russia
04 Jan. 1956
New York ,USA
Russian composer
Greco, Gaetano
more...
c.1657
Italy
c.1728Italian Baroque composer
Greef, Arthur de
more...
   
Green, Bennie
more...
   
Green, George Hamilton
more...
   
Green, Grant
more...
   
Green, John Waldo (Johnny)
more...
10 Oct 1908
New York, USA
15 May 1989
Los Angeles, USA
bandleader and composer. He was accompanist/arranger to stars such as James Melton, Libby Holman and Ethel Merman. It was while writing material for Gertrude Lawrence that he composed Body and Soul, the first recording of which was made by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra, eleven days before the song was copyrighted. He worked too as arranger to Gaetano Alberto "Guy" Lombardo (June 19, 1902–November 5, 1977), the Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States who with his three brothers Carmen, Lebert, and Victor and other musicians from his hometown of London, Ontario, formed the big band The Royal Canadians in 1924. It was famous for playing what is considered "The Sweetest Music This Side of Heaven."
Green, Philip
more...
   
Greene, Maurice
more...
12 Aug. 1696
London, England
1 Dec. 1755
England
English composer and organist. In 1735 he was appointed Master of the King's Musick
[entry prompted by Tony Staes]
Greer, John
more...
   
Grefinger, Wolfgang
more...
   
Gregg, Hubert Robert Harry19 Jul. 1914
London
29 Mar. 2004
Eastbourne, England
Broadcaster, actor, songwriter and theatre director, writer of Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner
Gregoir, Edouard
more...
   
Gregorc, Janez
more...
   
Gregori, Annibale
more...
   
Gregory I, Pope
more...
c.540
Italy
12 Mar. 604
Italy
a system of writing down reminders of chant melodies was probably devised by monks around 800 to aid in unifying the church service throughout the Frankish empire. Charlemagne brought cantors from the Papal chapel in Rome to instruct his clerics in the “authentic” liturgy. A program of propaganda spread the idea that the chant used in Rome came directly from Pope Gregory I (also known as Gregory the Great or Gregory Diagolus) who was universally venerated. Pictures were made to depict the dove of the Holy Spirit perched on Gregory's shoulder, singing God's authentic form of chant into his ear. This gave rise to calling the music "Gregorian chant". A more accurate term is plainsong or plainchant
Gregson, Edward
more...
   
Gregson-Williams, Harry
more...
13 Dec. 1961
England
  a Golden Globe- and Grammy-nominated British film score composer
Greif, Olivier
more...
   
Greifendorf, Valentin
more...
   
Greiter, Matthias
more...
   
Grella-Mozejko, Piotr
more...
   
Grenet, Eliseo
more...
   
Grenfell, Maria1969
Malaysia
 composer and lecturer at the Conservatorium of Music of the University of Tasmania in Hobart. She was raised in Christchurch, New Zealand. She received a Master of Music degree from the University of Canterbury, a Master of Arts from the Eastman School of Music, and a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Southern California, where she was also a lecturer. Her teachers include Stephen Hartke, Erica Muhl, James Hopkins, Joseph Schwantner, and Samuel Adler
Grenon, Nicolas
more...
c.1375
possibly Paris, France
1456
Cambrai
a French composer of the early Renaissance. He wrote in all the prevailing musical forms of the time, and was a rare case of a long-lived composer who learned his craft in the late 14th century but primarily practiced during the era during which the Renaissance styles were forming
Grenser, Johann Friedrich
more...
   
Gretchaninov, Alexander
more...
25 Oct. 1864
Moscow, Russia
3 Jan. 1956
New York, USA
conservative Russian Romantic composer
Grethen, Luc
more...
1964
Luxembourg
 oboist and composer from Luxembourg
Gretry, André Ernest Modeste
more...
8 Feb. 1741
Liège, Belgium
24 Sep. 1813
Montmorency, France
Belgian composer, who trained in Italy and worked from 1767 onwards in France
Gretry, Lucille Angelique-Dorothee-Lucie1772
Paris, France
1796produced an operetta at the age of sixteen
Greve, Conrad1820
Germany
1851he arrived in Finland in 1842 and was active as a conductor in Turku. He revisited the Leipzig Conservatory for further studies on a number of occasions. His output includes some orchestral works, some instrumental works and incidental music for plays
Grever, Maria
more...
   
Grewelding, Hansjacob
more...
   
Grey, Geoffrey
more...
   
Gribbin, Deirdre
more...
1967
Belfast, Northern Ireland
 studied composition at Queen's University Belfast and at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, award winner in the 2003 UNESCO International Rostrum of Composers with her work Empire States, and winner of a prestigious Arts Foundation Award for her first opera Hey Persephone! which had an acclaimed run at the Aldeburgh/Almeida Opera Festival
Grieg, Edvard (Hagerup)
more...
15 Jun. 1843
Bergen, Norway
4 Sep. 1907
Bergen, Norway
Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the romantic period. He is best known for his Piano Concerto in A minor, for his incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's play Peer Gynt, and for his Lyric Pieces for the piano
Griend, Koos van de
more...
   
Grier, Francis
more...
   
Griffes, Charles
more...
   
Griffin, Charles
more...
   
Griffin, Johnny
more...
   
Griffiths, David
more...
   
Grigny, Nicolas de
more...
   
Grigoriu, Teodor
more...
   
Grillo, Francesco
more...
   
Grillo, Giovanni
more...
   
Grimace
more...
fl. late 14th century French composer. He may have been connected with Avignon, but did not adopt the rhythmically very complex style of the other Avignon composers of the period; the style of his three ballades, one rondeau and one virelai recalls Machaut. His best known work, A l'arme a l'arme,uses fanfare-like motifs to illustrate the warlike imagery of its text
Grimani, Maria Margheritafl. early 1700s composer who was published in 1713
Grimm, Heinrich
more...
   
Grimm, Julius Otto
more...
   
Grimsson, Larus
more...
   
Gringolts, Ilya
more...
   
Grippe, Ragnar
more...
   
Grisey, Gerard
more...
   
Gritton, Peter
more...
   
Grodzki, Boleslavs13 Oct 1865
St. Petersburg, Russia
 Russian composer
Grofé, Ferde (Ferdinand Rudolph von Grofé)
more...
27 Mar. 1892
New York, USA
3 Apr. 1972
Santa Monica, USA
by the age of 15, Grofé was working in bands as an alto hornist and in the Los Angeles Philharmonic as a viola player. Around 1920 he began working as an arranger and pianist with the jazz bandleader Paul Whiteman. Grofé arranged music (including George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue) and composed original pieces in a symphonic jazz style. Grofé's own works included Mississippi: A Journey in Tones in 1925, Metropolis: A Fantasie in Blue in 1928, and the Grand Canyon Suite in 1931. Each piece painted a musical portrait of an American scene. He continued to work for Whiteman until 1932
Groh, Johann
more...
   
Groom, Mrs. T. (nee Wilkinson) 1867
England
a vocalist of composer of songs
Grondahl, Agathe
more...
   
Grondahl, Launy
more...
   
Groneman, Johannes Albertus
more...
   
Groneman, Johannes Frederikus
more...
   
Groot, Adriaan de
more...
   
Groot, Cor de
more...
   
Groot, Hugo de
more...
   
Groot, Rokus de
more...
   
Groote, Alianus de
more...
   
Groslot, Robert
more...
   
Gross, Joseph Arnold
more...
   
Grossi, Andrea
more...
   
Grossi, Carlo
more...
   
Grossi, Lodovico
more...
   
Grossin, Estienne
more...
   
Grosskopf, Erhard
more...
   
Grosz, Wilhelm
more...
   
Grothe, Franz
more...
   
Groven, Eivind
more...
   
Grovlez, Gabriel
more...
   
Grua, Carlo Luigi
more...
c.1700
Milan, Italy
11 Apr. 1773
Mannheim
Italian composer who is best known for his position as Kapellmeister for the Electoral Court at the German city of Mannheim
Grubbs, David
more...
   
Gruber, Franz Xaver
more...
   
Gruber, Heinz Karl
more...
   
Grudzien, Jacek
more...
1961
Warsaw, Poland
 studied composition with Wlodzimierz Kotonski and improvisation with Szabolcs Esztenyi at the Warsaw Academy of Music. Grudzien's compositional debut took place at the International Festival of Contemporary Music "Warsaw Autumn" in 1983. He has participated in the International Courses for Young Composers at Kazimierz Dolny, Darmstadt, Patras and Dartington. In 1986 he received a postgraduate scholarship granted by Witold Lutoslawski. He went to London where he studied electronic music and MIDI systems
Gruenberg, Louis
more...
   
Grun, Bernhard
more...
   
Grundman, Clare Ewing
more...
5 Nov. 1911
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
16 Jun. 1996
South Salem, New York ,USA
American teacher, composer and arranger
Grünfeld, Alfred
more...
18521924Austrian pianist, teacher and composer
Gruntz, George
more...
24 Jun. 1932
Basle, Switzerland
 Swiss jazz pianist, organist, harpsichordist, keyboardist and composer
Grusin, Dave
more...
26 Jun. 1934
Littleton, Colorado, USA
 Academy Award-winning American composer, arranger and pianist
Grützmacher, Friedrich Wilhelm
more...
1 Mar. 1832
Dessau, Anhalt, Germany
23 Feb. 1903
Dresden, Germany
noted German cellist in the second half of the 19th century. Grützmacher is most famous today for taking samples of four different works to form his edition of Boccherini's Concerto in B flat, still being published and performed. He was also guilty of "rearranging" Bach's Suites, which he completely reorganized with additional chords, passages and embellishments. His cadenzas for Boccherini and the Haydn D Major are effective, and often performed to this day
Gryce, Gigi (later named Basheer Qusim)
more...
28 Nov. 1925
Pensacola, Florida, USA
14 Mar. 1983
Pensacola, Florida, USA
American saxophonist, flutist, clarinetist, composer, arranger, educator, and big band bandleader
Guaccero, Domenico
more...
11 Apr. 1927
Palo del Colle (Bari), Italy
24 Apr. 1984
Rome, Italy
Guaccero was a representative of the New Music movement of 1960s and 1970s Italy
Gualtieri, Antonio
more...
   
Guami, Francesco
more...
c.15441602Italian composer, brother of Gioseffo Guami. A sackbut player at the Munich court from 1568 to 1580, court Kapellmeisterat Baden Baden in 1588, and later worked as maestro di cappella at churches in Udine, Venice and Lucca. He published three volumes of madrigals and one of instrumental ricercars
Guami, Gioseffo
more...
c.1540
Lucca, Italy
1611
Lucca, Italy
an Italian composer, organist, and singer of the late Renaissance Venetian School. He was a prolific composer of madrigals and instrumental music, and was renowned as one of the finest organists in Italy in the late 16th century; he was also the principal teacher of Adriano Banchieri
Guarnieri, Adriano
more...
   
Guarnieri, Camargo
more...
   
Guastavino, Carlos
more...
5 Apr. 1912
Santa Fe Province, Argentina
28 Oct. 2000
Santa Fe Province, Argentina
composer who was perhaps the most quietly distinctive in 20th-century Argentinean music. Vigorously rejecting the stylistic radicalism of Alberto Ginastera and his younger compatriot Mauricio Kagel, he followed in the footsteps of 19th-century nationalists such as Julián Aguirre and Alberto Williams
Gubaidulina, Sofia
more...
1931
Chistopol, Tatar Republic
 after studies in piano and composition at the Kazan Conservatory, she studied composition with Nikolai Peiko at the Moscow Conservatory, pursuing graduate studies there under Vissarion Shebalin. Until 1992, she lived in Moscow. Since then, she has made her primary residence in Germany, outside Hamburg
Gubert (or Hubert), Nikolay Al'bertouich (or Albertovich)19 Mar 1840
St. Petersburg, Russia
8 Oct 1888
Moscow, Russia
Russian teacher and composer
Gubitsch, Tomas
more...
   
Gudmundsdottir, Bjork
more...
   
Gudmundsen Holmgreen, Pelle
more...
   
Gudden, Wolfgang
more...
   
Guedron, Pierre
more...
   
Guedike, Alexander Fyodorovich (see Gedike, Alexander Fyodorovich)   
Gueit Marius1808
France
1865
Paris, France
blind from the age of one and a half, he was admitted at the Institut des Jeunes Aveugles de Paris when he was eleven years old. He learned there the basics of piano playing, and learned to play the cello and the organ. After leaving the institute he became organ teacher at the institute. Among his pupils was Alphonse Dupuis, himself blind from birth, and organist at the church of St. Paul in Orléans, who suggested that Guiet take the post of organist at Saint-Paterne at Orléans. He was a brillant organist, and is known to have performed on the cello in several chamber music concerts. Because of his disappointment over the refusal to restore the rapid deterioration of the organ at the Saint-Paterne he left for Paris and became a post at his old Institut des Jeunes Aveugles
Guenin, Helene 1791
France
 wrote an opera at the age of seventeen
Guerau, Francisco
more...
1649
Majorca, Spain
1717/1722a Spanish Baroque composer best known work is a collection of pieces for baroque guitar entitled Poema harmónico that was published in 1694
Guerini, Francesco
more...
   
Guerra-Peixe, César
more...
18 Mar. 1914
Petrópolis, Brazil
26 Nov. 1993
Rio de Laneiro, Brazil
Brazilian violinist, ethnomusicologist and composer
Guerre (de la), Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet16591729
Paris, France
rose to prominence at the early court of Louis XIV as a child prodigy, dazzling the young king with her prowess at the harpsichord. She was four. She remained a royal favourite throughout Louis' reign, composing chamber music and an opera
Guerrero, (Antonio) Alberto (García)
more...
6. Feb. 1886
La Serena, Chile
7 Nov. 1959
Toronto, Canada
teacher, pianist and composer
Guerrero, (Eduardo) "Lalo"
more...
24 Dec. 1916
Tucson, AR, USA
17 Mar. 2005
Palm Springs, CA, USA
Mexican-American singer songwriter
Guerrero, Francisco
more...
4 Oct. 1528
Seville, Spain
8 Nov. 1599
Seville, Spain
Spanish composer, a pupil of Morales. He was self taught on the vihuela, harp, cornett and organ. He was maestro de capilla of Jaén Cathedral (1546-9) and then vice-maestro (1551) and finally maestro (1574-99) of Seville Cathedral. He visited Rome (1581-2), Venice and the Holy Land (1588-9). He is considered the most important 16th-century Spanish composer of sacred music after Victoria. Among a large quantity of published music are 18 masses, 150 or so motets and secular works
Guerrero, Francisco II
more...
   
Guerrero, Jacinto
more...
   
Guerrero, Pedroc. 1515 brother of Francisco Guerro (c.1528-1599) who probably died in Italy
Guest, George
more...
   
Guest (Mrs. Miles), Jane Mary1764
England
after 1814a child prodigy who was said to be one of J.C. Bach's last pupils. She won renown as professional musician, eventually earning recognition from Queen Charlotte
Guezec, Jean Pierre
more...
   
Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro14101481Jewish dance master, choreographer, composer, and theorist. His De practica seu arte tripudii survives in seven known versions, plus three existing fragments. The Sparti translation is from the 1463 version written by the scribe Paganus Raudensis in Milan for Galeazzo Sfroza, believed to be the original source for the various copies. There are significant differences between each of the versions of Guglielmo's work, with varying degrees of completeness and clarity, added or omitted information, and major innovations to some dance choreographies. De practica includes a theoretical introduction proving the moral and ethical worth of dance, a section on the fundamental concepts on which the art of dance is based, and a Socratic dialogue defending dancing and supporting the importance of his principles of dance. This is followed by the practice, which includes choreographies of 31 dances: 14 bassedanze, and 17 balli
Guiard
more...
   
Guidi, Peter
more...
   
Guignon, Jean Pierre
more...
   
Guilain, Jean Adam (né Jean-Adam-Guillaume Freinsberg)
more...
c.1680
Germany
after 1739
Paris, France
German-born musician and composer who moved to France sometime after 1702. His organ works include Pièces d'orgue pour le magnificat (only 1 of 2 volumes still exist) (1706) and 4 suites based on the church modes, consisting of 28 pieces
[information provided by Terry L. Mueller]
Guilfoyle, Ronan
more...
   
Guillaume IX, comte d'Aquitaine
more...
10711126known in English as William IX of Aquitaine, he was nicknamed the Troubador and was Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitiers as William VII of Poitiers between 1086 and 1126. He was also one of the leaders of the crusade of 1101 and one of the first medieval vernacular poets. His Occitan names were Guilhèm IX duc d'Aquitània e de Gasconha and Guilhèm VII comte de Peitieus. An anonymous 13th century biography of Guillaume, forming part of the collection Biographies des Troubadours, remembers him thus: "The Count of Poitiers was one of the most courtly men in the world and one of the greatest deceivers of women. He was a fine knight at arms, liberal in his womanizing, and a fine composer and singer of songs. He travelled much through the world, seducing women"
Guillaume de Poitiers
more...
c.1020
Préaux, Normandy
1090Norman chronicler, not to be confused with Guillaume of Aquitaine (see above) who is also known sometimes as Guillaume de Poitiers
Guillaume de Cabestang
more...
fl. 1212 more correctly, in Occitan, Guilhem de Cabestanh, a troubadour poet. According to his legendary vida, he was the lover of Seremonda, wife of Raimon of Castel-Rossillon. On discovering this, Raimon fed Cabestanh's heart to Seremonda. When he told her what she had eaten, she threw herself from the window to her death. This legend appears later in Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron and in the Cantos of Ezra Pound
Guillaume le Peigneur (see Amiens, Guillaume d')   
Guillemain, Louis-Gabriel
more...
5 Nov. 1705
Paris, France
1 Oct. 1770
Paris, France
French composer and violinist
Guillemant, Benoît
more...
fl.1746-1757
Paris, France
 French flutist and composer
Guillou, Jean
more...
   
Guilmant, Alexandre
more...
1837
Boulogne-sur-Mer, France
1911
Meudon, France
French organist and composer. Student of his father, then of Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, he became an organist and teacher in his place of birth. In 1871 he was appointed as organist of la Trinité church in Paris. From then on he followed a career as a virtuoso; he gave concerts in Europe as well as in the United States
Guimarães, Marco Antônio
more...
10 Oct. 1948
Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
 leader of the band Uakti, a Brazilian instrumental musical group that is composed of Marco Antônio Guimarães, Artur Andrés Ribeiro, Paulo Sérgio Santos, and Décio Ramos. Uakti is known for using custom-made instruments, built by the group itself
Guimarães de Pernambuco, João Teixeira
more...
1883
Pernambuco, Brazil
1947
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Brazilian composer particularly for guitar who was strongly influenced by popular music, side by side with Heitor Villa-Lobos
Guinjoan (Gispert), Joan
more...
28 Nov. 1931
Catalunya, Spain
 Spanish pianist and composer
Guinovart, Carles
more...
   
Guiran, Jean Pierre
more...
27 Jan. 1957
Vlissingen, The Netherlands
 Dutch composer of music for accordion. His music has been used widely in movies, theatre, dance performances (Accrorap, Resemblance, Johannes Wieland's Because there isn't any), TV productions (documentary about the Dutch novelist Albert Cornelis Baantjer), etc.
Guiraud, Ernest
more...
26 Jun. 1837
New Orleans, USA
6 May 1892
Paris, France
French composer who studied at the Paris Conservatoire, where he won the Grand Prix de Rome. His father had gained the same distinction many years prior to his son winning the award. Notably, this was the only instance of both father and son obtaining this prize
Guiraut Riquier
more...
c.12301292among the last of the Provençal troubadours
Gulak-Artemovsky, Semyon Stepanovich16 Feb. 1813
Gorodische, Russia
17 Apr. 1873
Moscow, Russia
Russian baritone, composer and playwright
Gulda, Friedrich
more...
   
Gulielmus, Monachus
more...
   
Gullin, Lars
more...
   
Gumi, Albert
more...
   
Gumpelzhaimer, Adam
more...
   
Gumprecht, Johann
more...
   
Gund, Robert
more...
   
Gungl, Johann
more...
   
Gungl, Joseph
more...
   
Gunn, Douglas1935
Dublin, Ireland
 well known from his countless concerts, radio broadcasts, television appearances, recordings, compositions, editions and arrangements, his musical career began as a choirboy at St. Patrick's Cathedral Dublin and the Chapel of Trinity College Dublin under Dr. George Hewson, and he studied with private teachers. After some years as Lay Vicar Choral and Choir Librarian at Christ Church Cathedral Dublin, he joined Radio Telefis Eireann working in Cork and Dublin. Throughout his career he has directed and conducted many vocal and instrumental ensembles most notably The Locrian Consort, The Patrician Consort, the R.T.E. Singers, the Irish Pro Musica Chorale, the Cork Schola Cantorum, Musick's Monument and of course The Douglas Gunn Ensemble. He was on the staff of the Cork School of Music from 1974 to 1987, teaching Recorder and Baroque Chamber Music. He also taught at the Dublin Early Music Centre for nine years. Douglas Gunn is an authority on Irish Music of the 17th and 18th centuries. As a composer, most of Douglas Gunn's output has been choral music. He has also written for solo voice with various instruments, and some chamber music, including music for recorder
Gunn, John
more...
c.1765
Edinburgh, Scotland
c.1824
Edinburgh, Scotland
a fine cellist, but also a remarkable writer on music. In the year 1790 he went to London as a cello teacher. He there published, in 1793, an instruction book for his instrument, under the title of The Theory and practice of fingering the Violoncello, containing rules and progressive lessons for attaining the knowledge and command of the whole compass of the instrument. Fetis observes, with regard to the preface of this work, consisting of two parts, that it contains a remarkable account of the origin of the Violoncello, as well as of old and modern stringed instruments. Gunn wrote another work, published in London in 1801, which has reference to the Violoncello. The title of it is, Essay theoretical and practical on the application of Harmony, Thorough-bass, and Modulation to the Violoncello. Besides this he published, in 1794, a School of the German flute, and in 1807 he brought out his most important work- viz., An Historical Inquiry respecting the performance on the Harp in the Highlands of Scotland from the earliest times until it was discontinued about the year 1734. In the year 1795 Gunn returned to Edinburgh to take up an advantageous post that was offered to him, and which he apparently held until his death.
Gunning, Christopher
more...
1944 Gunningo has published some instructional instrumental solos, but is better known for his most attractive music for TV and film documentaries among which we can instance the TV film Yorkshire Glory, is presenting the beauties of that country through the seasons
Gunuc, Kemal
more...
   
Guo, Wenjing
more...
1956 Chinese composer who teaches composition at the Central Conservatory in Beijing
Guram, Tara
more...
   
Gurdjieff, Georges
more...
   
Guridi Bidaola, Jesus
more...
   
Gurilyov, Alexander Lvovich3 Sep. 1803
Moscow, Russia
11 Sep. 1858
Moscow, Russia
Russian violinist, pianist, teacher, composer and songs
Gurilyov, Lev Stepanovich1770
Moscow, Russia
1844
Moscow, Russia
Russian composer
Gurney, Ivor
more...
28 Aug. 1890
Gloucester, England
26 Dec. 1937
Dartford, Kent
English composer and poet
Gurowitsch, S
more...
   
Gursching, Albrecht
more...
   
Gurtu, Trilok
more...
   
Gussago, Cesario
more...
fl. 1599-1612 Italian composer and priest who in 1599 was appointed Vicar-General of the Order of S. Gerolamo in Brescia, and in 1612 organist of S. Maria delle Grazie. He published instrumental sonatas in up to 8 parts, and large- and small-scale motets and psalms
Gustafsson, Kaj-Erik1942
Finland
 the church drama Joona (Jonah, 1988) is an example of the religious or meta-religious genre found in Finnish opera. Gustafsson has also written sacred choral music
Guthrie, Arlo
more...
10 Jul. 1947
Brooklyn, New York, USA
 an American folk singer. His most famous work is Alice's Restaurant, a talking blues song that lasts 18 minutes and 20 seconds (in its original recorded version; Guthrie has been known to spin the story out to forty-five minutes in concert). The song is a bitingly satirical protest against the Vietnam War draft
Guthrie, Woodrow Wilson (Woody)
more...
14 Jul. 1912
Okemah, Oklahoma, USA
3 Oct. 1967
Queens, New York, USA
an influential and prolific American folk musician noted for his identification with the common man, and for his abhorrence of fascism, politicians, hypocritical people and economic exploitation. He is best known for his song "This Land Is Your Land". He is the father of musician Arlo Guthrie
Gutierrez de Padilla, Juan
more...
   
Guy, Barry
more...
   
Gwinner, Volker
more...
   
Gyger, Elliott
more...
   
Gyrowetz, Adalbert17631850Austrian composer who studied with Mozart in Vienna and later went to London where he assisted Haydn (who he had also met in Vienna). After returning to Vienna he would act as a pallbearer at Beethoven's funeral and assisted the young Chopin in his preiere in Vienna
Gyselynck, Franklin
more...
   
Gyselynck, Jean
more...