composers biography : H - Hz
 



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NameBornDiedInformation
Haag, Dan
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1980
USA
 American composer of many genres. He is a graduate of Ball State University, and he currently teaches instrumental music at Eastern Hancock Schools in Charlottesville, Indiana
Haag, Ellen  composer of the experimental theatre work entitled I'll be right back
Haag, Friedrich
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10 Sep. 1880
Germany
21 Feb. 1959
Germany
pianist, violinist and composer of mainly vocal pieces as well as a considerable number works for accordion and for accordion orchestra
Haag, Hanno  performs with Anneuese Schlicker as the Mannheim Chamber Duo, Hanno Haag is also a fine composer and currently Director of the Mannheim School of Music, as well as conductor of several symphony orchestras
Haag, Tom  American organist and composer of the organ work entitled Unexpected Death inspired by the loss of a fellow student's baby after several month's pregnancy. It is a serial piece. It begins mildly, almost tonally in the opening measures, builds to a climax, then retreats to a quiet, moving contrapuntal section and ends as it began
Haan, Jacob de
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28 Mar. 1959
Heerenveen, The Netherlands
 Dutch composer, music arranger, and conductor
Haan, Jan de
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1951
The Netherlands
 Dutch composer, arranger, clinician, guest conductor and adjudicator. Between 1974 and 1994, Jan de Haan was the conductor of the Soli Deo Gloria brass band (also called Soli Brass)
Haapalainen, Antti
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4 Sep. 1966
Finland
 Finnish composer who places himself "in the neighbourhood of Post-Modernism and Neo-Classicism"
Haapalainen, Vaino19161977Finnish composer
Haapamäki, Sampo
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3 Feb. 1979
Hamina, Finland
 Finnish composer who studied with composition with Tapio Nevanlinna (1998-2002) and Veli-Matti Puumala (from 2002)
Haapanen, Perttu
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16 Mar. 1972
Finland
 "For me, composing is not just the assembling of pre-existing solutions into one work. It can involve a Faustian passion for exploration and for expanding one's view of the world," says Haapanen of his approach to composition
Haas, Georg Friedrich
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16 Aug. 1953
Graz, Austria
 Austrian composer of spectral music
Haas, Pavel
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21 Jun. 1899
Brno, Czechosolovakia
17 Oct. 1944
Auschwitz-Birkenau
Czech composer who perished in the Holocaust
Haas, Polo de
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Amsterdam, The Netherlands a pianist who is a leading exponent of contemporary music. He also has a number of compositions to his name
Haass, Maria Catharina1844
Germany
 composed songs and pieces for harmonium and piano. Also the editor of a music journal
Haavikko, Paavo
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Haba, Alois
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Habeneck, François-Antoine
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22 Jan. 1781
Mézières, France
8 Feb. 1849French conductor and composer of operas and concert music; author of Méthode théorique et pratique de violon (1835)
Hacken, Huub ten
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Hackett, Maria1783
England
1874composed many songs and founded the Gresham Prize in 1831
Hacomplaynt (or Hacomblene), Robert
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fl 15th century King's scholar at Eton in 1469, Provost of King's 1509-28, his name is on the King's Chapel lectern. He is known today through a single work of his, a setting of Salve regina, that appears in the Eton Choirbook
Hacquart (or Hacart, Hakart), Karel (Carolus, Carel)c.1640
Bruges, Belgium
c.1701
The Hague, The Netherlands
player of the viol, lute and organ and composer. In 1678 he wrote the music for the earliest Dutch opera, Chelys. The ten trios and quartet sonatas in Harmonia Parnassia of 1686 are the most important works in his oeuvre
Haden, Charlie
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Hadermann, Jan
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Hadewijchfl. early 1200s
Belgium
 the most important exponent of love mysticism and one of the loftiest figures in the Western mystical tradition. Love mysticism sprang up during the second half of the 12th-century. It is a predominantly feminine phenomenon
Hadjidakis, Manos
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Hadjiev, Parashkev (see Gadjiev, Parashkev)   
Hadley, Henry
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Hadley, Patrick
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Haeffner, Johann Christian Friedrich
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Haenal Cronethal (de), Louise Augusta Julia, Marquise1836
Austria
1896
France
her opera La Nuit d’Epreuve won gold at Exposition of 1867
Haene, Rafael d'
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Haentjes, Werner
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Haentzschel, Georg
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Hafsteinsson, Gudmundur
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Hagans, Tim
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Hagen, Amand (-Jean-François-Joseph) Van der
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1753
Anvers, Belgium
1822
Paris, France
Belgian composer and clarinetist
Hagen, Bernhard Joachim
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Apr. 1720
in or nr. Hamburg, Germany
9 Dec. 1787
Ansbach, Germany
Hagen studied with Johann Pfeiffer, Kapellmeister at Bayreuth and was employed as violinist in the orchestra of Wilhelmine, wife of Margrave Friedrich. a German composer, violinist and lutenist. He was the last important composer of lute music in 18th century Germany
[entry prompted by Michael Clayton]
Hagen, Earle
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Hagen, Peter Albrecht van jr
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Hagenau, Reinmar von
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fl. 1190-1210  the most important Minnesinger before Walther von der Vogelweide
Hagg, Jacob Adolf
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Hagius, Konrad
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Hahn, Ludwig
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Hahn, Reynaldo
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9 Aug. 1875
Caracas, Venezuela
28 Jan. 1947
Paris, France
a naturalised French composer, conductor, music critic and diarist. Best known as a composer of songs, he wrote in the French classical tradition of the mélodie. The fine craftsmanship, remarkable beauty, and originality of his works capture the insouciance of la belle époque
Hahne, Dorothee
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Hails, John
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Hailstork, Adolphus
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17 Apr. 1941
Rochester, New York, USA
 American composer and educator. He grew up in Albany, New York, where he studied violin, piano, organ, and voice. Hailstork is of African American ancestry and his works blend musical ideas from both the African American and European traditions
Hainl, François George (see George-Hainl, François)   
Hair, Graham
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Hairston, Jester
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Hajary, Majoie
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Hajdu, Georg
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Hajibeyov (or Gadzhibekov), Ismayil1949 Soltan's son and represents the third generation of the Hajibeyov family. Ismayil works in modern music, known in Azerbaijan as "yeni musiqi" (new music). He is an assistant professor of composition in the Academy of Music
Hajibeyov (or Gadzhibekov), Niyazi (1912-1984son of Zulfugar Hajibeyov and known simply by his first name Niyazi, he directed the Symphony Orchestra for about 40 years. Dmitri Shostakovich observed that Niyazi was the first world-renowned conductor of the Soviet East. Niyazi was the composer of the symphonic mugam Rast (1956) , the opera Khosro and Shirin (1940) and the ballet Chitra, for which he was awarded the Nehru prize (1971) . He was also honored as 'People's Artist of the USSR'
Hajibeyov (or Gadzhibekov), Rauf Soltan19221974the son of Ismayil Hajibeyov, Uzeyir 's uncle. Soltan was a composer who contributed greatly to the formation of national symphonic music of Azerbaijan. He is remembered for such works as Caravan, Overture and Concerto. Soltan served as rector of Azerbaijan State Conservatory (now Baku Music Academy) from 1969 to 1974
Hajibeyov (or Gadzhibekov), Uzeyir
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18 Sep. 1885
Karabakh, Azerbaijan
22 Nov. 1948
Baku, Azerbaijan
author of the national anthem of Azerbaijan, Hajibeyov studied with Prokofiev in St. Petersburg and, although he became a Russian modernist, at heart he remained an Azeri sentimentalist. He single-handedly established the genre of mugham opera. His grand classics, Layla and Majnun, Koroghlu and Mashade Ibad drawn on the best of Azeri literature. The Cloth Peddler is a lighter operetta which satirizes the clash of old Azeri traditions with new ideas introduced in Baku during the first oil boom at the turn of the 20th century. The opera follows the comic twists and turns of Asker and Gulchora, the former a Westernized oil baron who scorns the customary prohibition against meeting one’s bride before the wedding day, the latter a beautiful maiden whose tradition-bound father, Sultan Bey, refuses to let her out of the house. Asker dresses himself as a lowly peddler to gain entrance to Gulchora’s room, where she immediately falls in love with the humble character of the disguise and not the cocky capitalist who wears it
Hajibeyov (or Gadzhibekov), Zulfugar18841950Uzeyir's brother, he was also a composer and was actively involved in establishing the Music Comedy Theatre. He is remembered for composing the opera Ashug Garib (1916)
Hajiyev, Jovdat1917 a student of Shostakovich, he wrote the first symphony in Azerbaijan, Socialist Azerbaijan (1936). His other works include the symphonic poem, Letter to Siberia (1937) based on a famous poem by Pushkin, Azerbaijan Suite for Symphony Orchestra, Fugues for String Quartet. Collaborating with Gara Garayev, he wrote the opera, Aina" (1939) and Vatan (Motherland, 1945). He was deeply involved with organizing higher musical education and directing the Azerbaijan Conservatory of Music
Hakanson, Knut Algot
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4 Nov. 1887
Kinna, Sweden
13 Dec. 1929
Helsingborg, Sweden
Swedish conductor and composer
Hake, Hans
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1628 Germany composer
Hakim, Naji Subhy Paul Irénée
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31 Oct. 1955
Beirut, Lebanon
 organist, composer, and improviser. He studied under Jean Langlais, and succeeded Messiaen as organist at the Église de la Sainte-Trinité
Hakmoun, Hassan
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193
Marrakech, Morocco
 Moroccan Gnawa musician
Hakola, Kimmo
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27 Jun. 1958
Finland
 one of the most original Finnish composers of his generation. The dramatic power, instrumental dexterity, carefully polished details and capricious, even humorous idiom of his music appeal to audiences and critics alike. Indeed, Hakola says that he sees music as drama
Halajian (or Halajyan), David
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1962
Yerevan, Armenia
SwitzerlandArmenian composer and choral conductor
Halevi, Jehuda (or Yehudah ha-Levi)
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c.1080
Toledo, Spain
1141
Egypt
Jewish poet and philosopher whose poems form the basis of a number of works composed by others
Halévy, (Jacques François) Fromental (Élie)
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27 May 1799
Paris, France
17 Mar. 1862
Nice, France
French composer. Though his contemporaries ranked him second to Meyerbeer in tragic subjects and second to Auber in comic ones, he had an easy success in the fiercely competitive musical world of Paris. He is known today largely for his opera La Juive. He was also the author of textbooks and volumes of memoirs and funeral orations
Haley, Bill
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Halffter, Cristobal
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Halffter, Ernesto
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Halffter, Rodolfo
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Halkias, Tasos
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Hall, Jim
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Hall, John T
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Hallam, Norman
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Halle, Adam de la
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c.1237
France
1288French-born trouvère, poet and musician, who broke with the long-established tradition of writing liturgical poetry and music to be an early founder of secular theatre in France
Halle, John
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Hallett, Sylvia
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Hallgrimsson, Haflidi
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Hallstrom, Ivar
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Halvorsen, Johan
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Hambraeus, Bengt
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Hamburg, Jeff
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Hämeenniemi, Eero
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29 Apr. 1951
Finland
 the first chairman of the Ears Open! Society and has often been seen as its leading figure in its early years. It is ironic that he became the first Ears Open! composer to abandon Modernism, turning to a more traditionalwho had written a Symphony and a ballet based on a purely national subject
Hamel, Micha
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Hamelin, Marc Andre
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Hamerik, Asger
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Hamerik, Ebbe
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Hamers, Maurice
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Hamilton, Andrew
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Hamilton, Iain Ellis
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6 Jun. 1922
Glasgow, Scotland
28 Jul. 2000
London, UK
composer and writer
Hamlisch, Marvin
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Hammer, Franz Xaver
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Hammerschmidt, Andreas
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Hammerstein, Oscar II
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Hammerth, Johan
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Hampton, John
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fl. 15th century composer of a setting of Salve regina that appears in the Eton Choirbook
Hampton, Lionel
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Hancock, Charles
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fl. 1845-1846 publisher (1845-6) of three 'preceptors' or musical instruction books, for the accordion, the flute, and the violin; also a composer
Hancock, Gerre
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Hancock, Herbie
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Handel, Darrell
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Handel, Georg Friedrich (originally Händel)
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23 Feb. 1685
Halle-in-Saxony, Prussia
14 Apr. 1759
London, England
Handel adopted the spelling George Frideric Handel on his naturalization as a British citizen. His name is spelled Händel in Germany and elsewhere, and Haendel in France, which causes no small grief to cataloguers everywhere. There was another composer with a similar name, Handl, who was a Slovenian. He was usually known as Jacobus Gallus
Handl Carniolus, Jacob (see Gallus Carniolus, Jacobus)   
Handy, George
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Handy, John
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Handy, William Christopher
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16 Nov. 1873
Florence, Alabama, USA
28 Mar. 1958
New York, USA
African American blues composer and musician, often known as "the Father of the Blues"
Hanf, Rudolf
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Hanff, Johann Nicolaus
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Hanley, James F
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Hanmer, Ronald1917
Reigate, UK
1996a highly regarded composer and arranger for light orchestra, his output in this area alone totalling well over 500 items, including some forty arrangements for the ITMA programme. Hanmer studied at Blackheath Conservatory and was a theatre organist between 1935 and 1948
Hannan, Michael
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Hannan, Peter
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Hannelius, Gabriel17521803a district judge in Finland, he has left a number of pieces for chamber ensemble in a music-book entitled Flaut Travers; these pieces are not known from any other source. They are akin in style to Quantz, representing the transition from the late Baroque to the Classical period
Hannikainen, Ilmari
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19 Oct. 1892
Finland
25 Jul. 1955Finnish pianist and composer who expanded the Late Romantic style towards Impressionism. His piano works also owe a fair amount to such great Romantic predecessors as Schumann, Liszt and Rakhmaninov. Hannikainen's career as a pianist and a respected teacher prevented his output from becoming as extensive as that of Palmgren. In addition to piano music, Hannikainen wrote chamber music including the Piano Quartet (1913) and the String Quartet (1919), solo songs and the 'folk opera' or Singspiel Talkootanssit (The Village Dance, 1930), which was very popular in its day
Hannikainen, P. J.18541924The oldest Finnish choir still in existence is the Swedish-speaking students' male voice choir Akademiska Sångföreningen, founded in 1838. The choir later became bilingual, but the language conflict led the Finnish-speaking members to resign in 1882 and to found their own male voice choir in the following year, Ylioppilaskunnan Laulajat (the Helsinki University Chorus, YL). Hannikainen was the founding conductor as well as being a noted choral composer
Hänninen, Heino1946 horn-player in the Pori City Orchestra and also conductor of the Pori Band, he has written his Juhlasoitto (Festival overture) for this band
Hanrahan, Kip
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Hansen, Thorvald
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Hanson, Howard
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Hanson, Sten
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1936
Klövsjö, Sweden
 composer and one of the founders of electroacoustic music in Sweden. He is a pioneer of the Text Sound Composition. After directing Fylkingen, he was president of the Swedish Composers' Union. He is presently president of the International Confederation of Electroacoustic Music
Hanssens, Charles Louis II
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Hanus, Jan Adolf Josef
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2 May 1915
Prague
30 July 2004,
Prague
composer and music editor, who was born into a musical family where his mother had been a piano pupil of Zdenek Fibich and his grandfather was Frantisek Urbánek, a leading Czech music publisher and friend of Dvorák. Hanus took composition lessons with Otakar Jeremiás and entered the Prague Conservatory to study conducting under Pavel Dedecek, after which he spent three years with the Urbánek family music publishing business. From 1939 Hanus was a member of the committee of Prítomnost ("The Present"), the leading Czech society for contemporary music as well as being an active member of the Fibich, Foerster and Ostrcil Societies. From 1949, he worked as an editor with Orbis and KLHU. His work on the Musica Antiqua Bohemica series continued until 1955. As a strong anti-communist and Catholic, Hanus' considerable musical output as a composer fell in and out of favour at different periods of his long life
Harada, Keiko
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Harahap, Irwansyah
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Harant, Krystof
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Harbison, John
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Harburg, E. Y.18981981writer of light verse, notes, songs for political benefits, and lyrics for musicals and films
Harcourt [d'Harcourt], Eugène d'2 May 1859
Paris, France
4 Mar. 1918
Locarno
French-born composer
Hardebeck, Carl
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Harder, Egil
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Hardin (Harding), Elizabethfl. 1760-70s
London
 organist of St. Peter-le-Poor, London, she published Six Lessons for the Harpsichord in 1770
Hardin, Louis
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Harding, Buster
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Hardouin, Henri
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Hardy, Henry (of Oxford)
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  little is known of Henry Hardy beyond the fact that about 1800 he published an instruction book with the title, The Violoncello Preceptor, with a compleat set of Scales for fingering in the various keys, etc.
Hardy, John
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Hargraeves, Walter
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Harle, John
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Harline, Leigh
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Harman, Chris Paul
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Harmon, John
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1935
Oashkosh, Wisc., USA
 a 1957 cum laude composition major from the Lawrence Conservatory of Music in Appleton, Wisconsin, John's distinguished career as a composer has encompassed many exciting styles. Few composers have explored as many musical directions with such passion as Mr. Harmon. The gift of his compositions covers a broad spectrum of performing media including songs, chamber music, jazz, orchestra, band, chorus, sacred music, solo piano and music for children. The titles and content of many of his compositions reflect Mr. Harmon's deep interest in environmental issues and Native American folklore. An easy-going and very spiritual man, John Harmon reveres all forms of life as sacred, an attitude which is evidenced in the beauty of his art form
[entry prompted by Dr. Amy Dunker]
Harper, Edward
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17 Mar. 1941
Taunton, Somerset, England
12 Apr. 2009
Edinburgh, Scotland
Scottish-based composer, pianist, conductor and university lecturer who shot to fame in the 1970s with Fanny Robin, his marvellously tight-knit opera based on episodes from Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd
Harrington, Jeff
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Harriott, Joe
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Harris, Albert
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13 Feb. 1916
London, England
14 Jan. 2005
Auckland, New Zealand
British/American composer who worked most of his life in Hollywood as an orchestrator, arranger and composer for several of the big Film Studios and for such pop icons as Barbra Streisand, Roberta Flack and Cher. He came to New York in 1938. He earned a Doctor of Music degree from New York College of Music and moved to Los Angeles in 1942. Albert Harris studied composition with Mary Carr Moore and Eugen Zador in Los Angeles, and conducting with Richard Lert. He is a recipient of several awards for choral pieces, songs, and an octet for French Horn from the Los Angeles Horn Club. Albert Harris has lectured for UCLA and the Santa Barbara Academy of the West. He was Assistant Musical Director for NBC from 1946-49. He has arranged and conducted many dramatic scores for television and motion pictures. Albert Harris is a member of Composers and Lyricists Guild of America, and the Board of Directors of the American Society of Music Arrangers. He won the National Composer's Award and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his "Concerto de California" scored for guitar and String Quartet. Among those nominating Harris was Aaron Copeland with whom Harris shares a harmonic language that, in the words of Ned Rorem, "sounds like the great outdoors"
Harris, Clement
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Harris, Eddie
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Harris, Paul 'Harry'
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Harris, Ross
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Harris, Roy18981979Although Harris composed over 170 works, the backbone of his output was his series of symphonies. Harris wrote no opera, but he otherwise covered all the main genres of orchestral, vocal, choral, chamber and instrumental music, as well as writing a number of works for band. Harris’ Symphony 1933 was the first American symphony to be commercially recorded, but his most renowned work was his Symphony No. 3. During the 1930s, Harris taught at Mills College, and later, the Juilliard School of Music. His last teaching position was at California State University, Los Angeles
Harris, Stefon
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  vibraphonist-composer Stefon Harris, a graduate of the Manhattan School of Music, received a B.A. in Classical Music and an M.A. in Jazz Performance. Stefon is a recipient of the prestigious Martin E. Segal Award from Lincoln Center and earned a Grammy nomination for his 1999 release of Black Action Figure. he has been voted "Best Mallet Player" by the Jazz Journalist Association (2001 & 2000), "Debut Artist of the Year" by JazzTimes, Downbeat's Critics Poll Winner ("Talent Deserving Wider Recognition"), Newsweek's "Best Jazz CD," "Best New Talent" and 1999-2000 "Readers Poll Best Vibraphonist" by JazzIz Magazine and Chicago Tribune's "Debut of the Year"
Harris, Steve
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16 Aug. 1948
Mansfield, Notts., UK
11 Jan. 2008
Dorchester, Dorset, UK
percussionist and composer
Harris, William
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Harrison, Annie Fortescue (see Fortescue Harrison, Annie)   
Harrison, Bryn
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Harrison, George
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Harrison, Ian
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Harrison, Jonty
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27 Apr. 1952
Scunthorpe, UK
 a British electroacoustic music composer
Harrison, Lou
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14 May 1917
Portland, Oregon, USA
2 Feb. 2003
Lafayette, Indiana, USA
American composer. He was a student of Henry Cowell, Arnold Schoenberg, and K.R.T. Wasitodiningrat (Pak Cokro). Harrison is particularly noted for incorporating elements of the music of non-Western cultures into his work, with a number of pieces featuring traditional Indonesian gamelan instruments, and several more featuring versions of them made out of tin cans and other materials. The majority of his works are written in just intonation rather than the more widespread equal temperament. Harrison is one of the most prominent composers to have worked with microtones
Harrison, Sadie
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Harrison, Timothy Craig (see Craig Harrison, Timothy)   
Harron, Damien
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Harsh, Edward
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Harst, Dick Van der
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Harsanyi, Tibor
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Hart, James
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Hartke, Stephen
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Hartl, Heinrich
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Hartley, Fred
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19051980appointed Head of Light Music at the BBC in 1946, Fred Hartley produced much original music for the light orchestra, included were pieces like Alpine Festival, The Ball at Aberfeldy, Whispering Breeze, Zaza, The Hampden Road March, A Dream of Hawaii, Summer Evening in Santa Cruz, Three Violins, The Dublin Express, The Fair Maid of Moray, Fairy Song (in the Irish Manner), From the Misty Isles, Highland Lullaby, In a Dream, Midnight Sun, A Rose in Granada and Rouge et Noir. Some of the titles almost have a feel of Ketèlbey about them. For piano there was Shivering Ivories; song titles included Life is Nothing Without You, My Song Without a Name and Sally Horner
Hartley, Richard
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28 Jul 1944
Holmfirth, Yorks. UK
 British composer for both large and small screen. An example of the former is the remake of The Lady Vanishes; his TV music includes Tumbledown and ascore written to accompany George Eliot's Adam Bede
Hartley, Walter Sinclair
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Hartmann, Johan Peter Emilius
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14 May 1805
Copenhagen, Denmark
10 Mar. 1900
Copenhagen, Denmark
although he never developed an international following, this innovative leader of Danish Romanticism was greatly appreciated as a composer by Liszt, Grieg, Mendelssohn, Schumann, and many famous composers of the period
Hartmann, Karl Amadeus
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Hartmann, Thomas Alexandrovich de21 Sep. 1885
Khoruzhevka, Ukraine
26 Mar. 1956
Princeton, New Jersey, USA
studied with Anton Arensky and Serge Taneieff in Russia before going to Munich to study conducting with Felix Mottl. In Munich he collaborated with Vasily Kandinsky in the composition of Der gelbe Klang. He left Russia permanently during the revolution and after many years in Paris immigrated to the United States in 1950. He was an ardent follower and collaborator of the philosopher Gurjieff
Harty, Hamilton
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Harvey, Jonathan
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3 May 1939
Sutton Coldfield, England
4 Dec. 2012
Lewes, England
British composer influenced greatly by Milton Babbitt. His first opera, Inquest of Love, was performed by the English National Opera in June 1993. Harvey taught composition at the University of Stanford, was a Visiting Professor of Music at University of Oxford, Imperial College London, and an Honorary Professor at Sussex University
Harvey, Mary (The Lady Deering (Dering))16291704
Kent, UK
three of Lady Dering's songs were included in Lawes' publications of Jacobean lute songs, and although the title page mentions only Lawes as composer, Lady Dering's name appears on the music itself
Harvey, Mick
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Harvey, Paul Milton
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1935
Sheffield, UK
 British saxophonist and clarinetist, member of the London Saxophone Quartet, and composer
Harvey, Richard
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25 Sep. 1953
London, UK
 a British musician and composer, who is best known for his film and television soundtracks
Harwood, Basil
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11 Apr. 1859
Woodhouse, Gloucs., UK
3 Apr. 1949
London, UK
an English organist and composer.
Hasenohrl, Franz
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Haslinger, Tobias
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Hasprois, Jehan Simon
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Hasse, Johann Adolf (Adolph)
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25 Mar. 1699
Bergedorf, Germany
23 Dec. 1783
Venice, Italy
German composer whose great-grandfather, grandfather, father and brother were all musicians. He was active in Lübeck and Bergedorf. He studied voice in Hamburg from 1714 until joining the local opera as a tenor in 1718, moving to Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel in 1721, where his first opera, Antioco, was performed. He traveled to Italy in 1722, spending time in a number of cities before settling in Naples, where he studied briefly with Porpora, then with Alessandro Scarlatti. During 1726-33 over twenty of his stage works were produced for the Neapolitan court. Hasse was court composer at Dresden (1731-63). He wrote masses, oratorios and cantatas, sonatas, and concertos but was known chiefly for over 60 operas, written in a thoroughly Italianized style. They include Artaserse (first version, 1730), which was written for his wife, Faustina Bordoni Hasse, 1700-1781, one of the most celebrated singers of the period
Hasse, Nicolaus
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Hasse, Peter [Petrus]
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c. 15851640grandfather of Johann Adolf Hasse, German organist and composer
Hassell, Jon
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Hasselmans, Alphonse
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Hassler, Hans Leo
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bap. 26 Oct. 1564
Nuremberg, Germany
8 Jun. 1612
Frankfurt am Main, Germany
a German composer and organist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras
Hassler, Johann Wilhelm
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Hastings, Thomas
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17841872editor, professor of music, author of over 600 hymns, composer of over 1000 tunes (including tune for Rock of Ages), and music publisher (united words and tune of Just As I Am). An albino, he had poor eyesight throughout life
Hatfield, Stephen
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Hatton, John
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Hatze, Josip
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21 Mar. 1879
Split, Croatia
30 Jan. 1959
Split, Croatia
Croatian composer and conductor who studied under P. Mascagni at the Pesaro Conservatoire, graduating in 1902
Hatzfeld, Johannes
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Hatzis, Christos
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Haubenstock-Ramati, Roman
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Haucourt, Johannes
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Hauer, Josef Matthias
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Hauff Ferdinand1750
nr. Delft, The Netherlands
1812
Delft, The Netherlands
in 1809 he became Capellmeister in Delft. Of his life much is unknown. Fétis describes him as an exceptional organist who travelled a lot in Holland and Germany. He wrote music for the church, organ pieces, 5 piano concertos and chamber music
Hauff, Wilhelm Gottlieb
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Haug, Halvor
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Hauksson, Thorsteinn
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Haulteterre (de), Elizabethfl. 1737-68 composer
Hauptmann, Moritz
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13 Oct 1792
Dresden, Germany
3 Jan 1868
Leipzig, Germany
German composer and writer. Among his vocal compositions—by far the most important portion of his work—may he mentioned two masses, choral songs for mixed voices (Op. 32, 47), and numerous part songs. The results of his scientific research were embodied in his book Die Natur der Harmonik und Metrik (1853), a standard work of its kind, in which a philosophic explanation of the forms of music is attempted
Hausegger, Siegmund von
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Haussmann, Karin
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Haussmann, Valentin
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Hausswolff, Carl Michael von
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Hauta-aho, Teppo
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27 May 1941
Finland
 his music is grounded in a free-tonal environment, but he has occasionally experimented with other stylistic elements too. For example, his Double Bass Concerto Hippovariaatioita putkessa tai ilman (Hippo Variations in a Tube or without, 1985) begins in an almost Viennese Classical vein but soon progresses to Romantic and cautiously Modernist sections. His most Modernist and also his most highly rated work is Fantasia (1986) for trumpet and orchestra, with a demanding trumpet part floating above a richly coloured orchestra. Hauta-aho's output consists largely of concertos and chamber music works, often involving his own instrument, the double bass. He has also written a fair amount of pedagogical music
Hautman, Nicolas (see Hotman, Nicolas)   
Hautvast, Willy
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Havelaar, Rocco
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Havergal, William Henry
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Hawes, William
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Hawkins, Coleman
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Hawkins, Malcolm
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Hay, Edward Norman
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Hayakawa, Masaaki
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Hayasaka, Fumio
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Hayashi, Hikaru
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Hayden, Sam
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1968
Portsmouth, England
 studied composition with Jonathan Harvey and Michael Finnissy at Sussex University; Joseph Dubiel and David Rakowski at Columbia University, New York; and Louis Andriessen at the Royal Conservatory, The Hague. He completed a DPhil with Martin Butler at Sussex University, examined by Brian Ferneyhough and Julian Johnson. He has attended summer schools and courses tutored by composers including Richard Barrett, Sir Harrison Birtwistle, Vinko Globokar, Magnus Lindberg, Steve Martland, Colin Matthews, Martijn Padding and Michael Smetanin
Hayden, W.L.
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fl. 19th century guitarist, arranger and composer. His works are published by Oliver Ditson & Co.
Haydn, Michael
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14 Sep. 1737
Rohrau, Austria
10 Aug. 1806
Salzburg, Austria
younger brother of Franz Josef Haydn, a noted composer particularly of ecclesiastical music
Haydn, Franz Joseph
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31 Mar 1732
Gradisce, Austria
31 May 1809
Vienna, Austria
Haydn (originally 'Haiden') was born in an ethnic Croatian enclave in Burgenland (Gradisce) in Austria. His Croatian roots appear in the main theme of his London symphony no 164 in D major (movement IV), based on the well known Croatian traditional song "Oj, Jelena, Jelena, jabuka zelena" (Oj, Jelena, Jelena, my green apple). Also the final of his Es major symphony is based on the Croatian folk song Divojcica potok gazi (A little girl treads in a brook). The song widely known in Croatia, Nikaj na svetu lepsega ni, nego gorica kad nam rodi... (There is nothing more beautiful in the world than a fruitful hill) was also exploited by Haydn. He composed more than 100 symphonies, masses and oratorios, songs and many fine string quartets, a form his most famous pupils, Mozart and Beethoven, would extend
Hayes, Isaac
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20 Aug. 1942
Covington, Texas, USA
10 Aug. 2008
Memphis, Tennessee, USA
American soul and funk singer-songwriter, musician, record producer, arranger, composer, and actor
Hayes, Malcolm (Lionel Fitzroy)22 Aug. 1961
Overton, Wiltshire, England
 music journalist, writer and composer
Hayes, Morgan
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1973 British composer
Hayes, Philip
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1738
Oxford, England
1797
London, England
English organist and composer, successor to his father William in the positions of organist of Magdalen College, Oxford and professor of music of Oxford University, on his father's death in 1777.
Hayes, Roland3 Jun. 1887
Curryville, Georgia, USA
1 Jan. 1977
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Hayes was the first African American to establish an international career as a classically trained vocalist, becoming one of the highest paid musicians of his era. He was also a composer of numerous spiritual art songs
Hayman, Richard
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27 Mar 1920
Cambridge, Mass. USA
 composer, aarranger and harmonica virtuoso. He sometimes adapted his scores of popular melodies so that he could perform on his favourite instrument. He followed Leroy Anderson as an arranger for the Boston Pops Orchestra over a period of more than 30 years, and also served as Music Director of Mercury Records. He was regularly in demand to orchestrate Broadway shows and film soundtracks, and notable among his own compositions are No Strings Attached and Skipping Along
Hayne, Gilles
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Hays, Sorrel
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Hays, William Shakespeare
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Hazell, Chris
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He, Dong
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He, Xuntian
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1954
Sichuan, China
 Chinese composer who teaches composition at the Conservatory in Shanghai
Head, Michael
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Hearne, John
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Heath, David
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Heath, Jimmy
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Heath, Percy
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Heaton, Wilfred
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Hebenstreit, Michael
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Hebenstreit, Penteleon
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1667
Eisleben
1750first heard of in Leipzig where he played violin and taught dancing and various keyboard instruments, he fled Leipzig due to the threat of arrest for debts and entered the service of a pastor in Merseburg as a tutor to his children. It was here in 1697 that he invented, and with the assistance of the pastor produced, a dulcimer-like instrument with double strings of metal and gut. This instrument played its part in the early development of the fortepiano, as acknowledged by C.G Schröter, the instrument maker. Indeed a courtier travelling through the village was so impressed with the possibilities of the instrument and Hebenstreit's performance on it that he arranged for a demonstration at the Dresden court. Hebenstreit returned to Leipzig where he was apparently able to repay his debts and Johann Kuhnau reported in Mattheson's Critica Musica that Hebenstreit acted as a maitre de danse. Kuhnau emphasized the technical difficulty and skill of Hebenstreit's performances. In 1698 he was appointed dancing master by Duke Johann Georg of Weissenfels. In 1705 Hebenstreit visited Paris and created a sensation: Louis XIV was so impressed he ordered the instrument to be called the "pantaleon". Hebenstreit was the impetus for Abbe de Chateauneuf's Dialogue sur la musique des anciens a Monsieur. In 1706 Hebenstreit entered the service of Duke Johann Wilhelm of Eisenach as dancing master to his children. G.P.Telemann who was engaged as director in 1708 praised Hebenstreit's work, mastery of the French style and his virtuosity on the pantaleon and violin. On 11th May 1714 he entered the service of Augustus the Strong as chamber musician and pantaleonist and received, for a musician, an unusually high salary of 1200 thalers. Additionally he received 200 thalers for the upkeep of his instrument. In 1727 he took out a royal writ against Gottfried Silbermann for building a large number of pantaleons not commissioned by the inventor. By 1729 he was placed in charge of music for the Protestant court church: the musical provision for which was minimal, including cantor, vice cantor, organist and six choir boys. In 1733, due to his failing eyesight, he retired from pantaleon performance. By 1734 he was made director of Protestant church music and in 1740 was appointed a privy counsellor. Both these positions were sinecures for an elderly, long serving musician. Hebenstreit composed ten orchestral suites with French overtures which were lost in the Allied bombing of 1944 and La chasse for 9 instruments found in Fasch's inventory in Zerbst
Heberle, Anton
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Hecke (or Wanhecke), Van
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fl. 1770-1780 composer and performer of the bissex (a guitar-like instrument with twelve strings) who was active in Paris
Hedges, Anthony
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Hedges, Michael
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Hefti, Neal
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29 Oct. 1922
Hastings, Nebraska, USA
11 Oct. 2008
Toluca Lake, California, USA
forward-looking composer and arranger for Woody Herman and Count Basie was probably overwhelmed forever after he went to Hollywood and wrote the theme for the 1960’s television show Batman, and for the movie and television versions of The Odd Couple
Hegdal, Magne
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Heger, Robert
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Heggie, Jake
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Heiden, Bernhard
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Heidrich, Peter
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Heiller, Anton
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Heine, Heinrich
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Heinen, Jeannot
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1937
Luxembourg
 Luxembourg-born composer based in Baden-Baden, Germany
Heinichen, Johann David
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17 Apr 1683
Crössuln, nr. Weissenfels
16 Jul 1729
Germany
a German Baroque composer and music theorist who brought the musical genius of Venice to the court of Augustus the Strong in Dresden. In 1717, Heinichen became a colleague of Johann Sebastian Bach at the court of Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen, then went on to be Kapellmeister to the Elector of Saxony
Heininen, Paavo
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13 Jan. 1938
Helsinki, Finland
 "I emerged (in 1957) with works that in terms of their intervallic and rhythmic material were on the threshold of Serialist organization. But after the shock of the First Symphony (the orchestra refused to perform it in its entirety) I felt it necessary to explore other paths — Baroque forms and dance rhythms. Between 1960 and 1965, I advanced further (with the exception of "Petite symphonie joyeuse"), but I did not take a decisive step towards multi-dimensional Serialism; instead, I tried to create a coherent musical world view where the technical and sonorous properties of Serialism and aleatorics would appear as components"
Heiniö, Mikko
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18 May 1948
Finland
 "Contemporary music can, in theory, use just about any material, but not in just about any way," said Heiniö, summarizing the freedom of the Post-Modern composer and the responsibility that comes with this freedom
Heinrich, Antony Philip
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Heinrich VI, Holy Roman Emperor
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Nov. 1165
Nijmegen
28 Sep. 1197
Messina
sometimes called the Cruel, King of Germany 1190-1197, Holy Roman Emperor 1191-1197, and King of Sicily 1194-1197. He was a patron of poets and poetry, and he almost certainly composed the song Kaiser Heinrich, now among the Weingarten Song Manuscripts
Heinrich XXIV prinz Reuss
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Heinsius, Clara1801
Germany
1823published in Berlin in 1819
Heinsius, Michael Ernst
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Heinze, Gustav Adolf
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Heise, Peter
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Hekkema, Raaf
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Hekster, Walter
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Hekster, Willem
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Hektorovic, Petarfirst half of the sixteenth-centuryunknowna well known Croatian poet, nobleman, connaisseur of Latin language and classical literature, Hektorovic wrote his Ribanje i ribarsko prigovaranje in 1568, which is the first realistic epic poem of Croatian Renaissance literature. It includes four folk tunes accompanied with musical notation
Hele, George de la
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Hellawell, Piers
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Hellborg, Jonas
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Hellendaal, C M
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Hellendaal, Pieter
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Heller, Stephen (Istvan)
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15 May 1813
Budapest, Hungary
14 Jan. 1888
Paris, France
a Hungarian composer and pianist whose career spanned the period from Schumann to Bizet, and was an influence for later Romantic composers
[entry suggested by Ann Ly]
Hellinck (Hellingk), (Joannes) Lupus (Wulfaert)
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c.1494
Axel, Flanders
c. 14 Jan. 1541
Bruges, Belgium
a Flemish composer of the earlier part of the 16th century. His name is variously given as Joannes Lupus, Lupus Hellinck, Joannes Lupi, and sometimes Lupus or Lupi simply. Only once, in a publication of 1546, is the full name given. It was for some time uncertain whether Joannes Lupus and Joannes Lupi were one and the same person, but the identification seems now to be satisfactorily established.
Hellmesberger, Joseph II
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Helmbreker, Cornelis
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Helmont, Charles-Joseph van
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19 Mar. 1715
Brussels, Belgium
8 Jun. 1790
Brussels, Belgium
Belgian composer and organist
Helsky, Olavi  composer of light music. His Polonaise for windband is a typical concert piece from the early 20th century
Helsted, Carl Adolf
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Helsted, Eduard
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Helweg, Kim
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Hely-Hutchinson, Victor
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Hemberg, Eskil
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Hemel, Oskar van
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3 Aug. 1892
Anvers, Belgium
9 Jul. 1981
Hilversum, The Netherlands
Belgian-born composer and organist
Heming, Michael19201941
El Alamein, North Africa
his 'Threnody for a Soldier Killed in Action', which was completed from the composer's pencil sketches by Anthony Collins and briefly championed by Barbirolli, who recorded it with the Hallé. So popular did it become it was published in a piano arrangement, and received an entry in the fifth edition of Grove. Michael Heming, who was killed at the battle of El Alamein at the age of 21, made much play with the orchestral world of the disembodied middle sections of the slow movement and Epilogue of Bax's Third Symphony. This elegiac quality contrasts with other wartime works, which tended to reinforce the image of popular heroism (in film music such as Desert Victory and First of the Few) or when a work promoted an idealised pastoralism, as promoted in the other arts - painting, cinema - at the time by the official media
Hemingway, Gerry
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Hemmer, René
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1919
Luxembourg
 trumpeter, pianist and composer from Luxembourg
Henderickx, Wim
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Henderson, Joe
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Henderson, Ruth Watson
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Hendrie, Gerald
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Hendriks, Christiaan
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Hendriks, Tomas
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Hendrix, Jimi
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Heneker, David
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31 Mar 1906
Southsea, UK
 remembered for his songs and lyrics for Half A Sixpence (1963), after H.G. Wells' 'Kipps' but this was by no means his only stage show. For some of them like Jorrocks (1966) and Popkiss (1972) he wrote all the lyrics and music; for others like Expresso Bongo (1958), Make Me an Offer (1959), The Art of Living (1960), Charlie Girl (1965) and Phil the Fluter (1969) he had assistance though usually with lyrics rather than the music
Henestrosa, Luys Vengas de
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fl. 16th century Spanish composer and organist, author of Libro Nuevo para Tecla, harpa y Vihuela
Hengen, Knud Erik
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Hengeveld, Gerard
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Henkel, Michael
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Henkemans, Hans
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Henman, Geoffrey
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1896 active until well after the 1939-45 war, composer of songs, stage shows including The Boy Who Lost His Temper, the revue Howd'You Do? and the radio musical Mr. Barley's Abroad. He also wrote several works for orchestra
Henneberg, Johann
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Henneman, Ig
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Hennessy, Swan
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Henrique, Waldemar
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Henriques, Fini
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Henry, Pierre
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Henry III, der Erlauchte or Henry the Illustrious
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c.1215
Meissen (?), Germany
15 Feb. 1288
Dresden, Germany
famous as a patron of the arts and a model knight, and as a significant Minnesinger , poet and composer. He was patron of many tournaments and singing competitions, in which he also took part himself, and commissioned the famous Christherre-Chronik. He set to music religious hymns to be sung in the churches, by express permission of the Pope
Henry V, King of England
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Henry VI, King of England
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Henry VI, King of Germany
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Nov. 1165
Nijmegen
28 Sep 1197
Messina
sometimes called the Cruel, Henry was King of Germany (1190-1197), Holy Roman Emperor (1191-1197), and King of Sicily (1194-1197). Henry was fluent in Latin and, according to Alberic of Troisfontaines, was "distinguished by gifts of knowledge, wreathed in flowers of eloquence, and learned in canon and Roman law". He was a patron of poets and poetry, and he almost certainly composed the song Kaiser Heinrich, now among the Weingarten Song Manuscripts
Henry VIII, King of England
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28 Jun. 1491
Greenwich, London
28 Jan. 1547
Whitehall, London, England
King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. He was the second monarch of the Tudor dynasty, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry VIII is famous for having been married six times, "divorcing" two by execution, and ultimately breaking with Rome. He wielded perhaps the most untrammelled power of any English monarch, and brought about the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and the union of England and Wales. He was also an accomplished musician, author, and poet; his best known piece of music is Pastyme With Good Company (also known as The Kynges Ballade)
Henryson, Svante
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Hens, Charles
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Hensel, Fanny Cecilia Mendelssohn1805
Germany
1847pianist who composed two books of ‘Songs without words for piano'
Henselt, Adolf von
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Henschel, (Isidor) George18 Feb. 1850
Breslau, Prussia (now Wroclaw, Poland)
1934singer, conductor, and composer, George Henschel was one of the leading English musicians of his day. He was the first conductor of the Boston Symphony OrchestraHe began his career as a pianist but later found considerable success as a baritone
Henson-Conant, Deborah
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Hentschel, David
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Hentzschel, Johann
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Henze, Hans Werner
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1 Jul. 1926
Guterslöh, Germany
27 Oct. 2012
Dresden, Germany
major German composer of the post-1945 era
Heppener, Robert
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Herault, Mllefl. 1702-1726 composer
Herbeck, Johann
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Herberigs, Robert
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Herbert, Christopher
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Herbert, Peter
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Herbert, Victor August
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Herbst, Johann Andreas
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Heredi, Francesco (see Eredi, Francesco)   
Herford, John
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Héritier, Isaac l'
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fl.c. 1540 composer of at least three chansons which were published by the music printer Jacques Moderne in Lyon in 1541
Héritier, Jean l' (Lhéritier, Lirithier, Heritier and other spellings also exist)
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c.1480
diocese of Thérouanne, Pas-de-Calais, France
after 1551
possibly Venice, Italy
a French composer of the Renaissance. He was mainly famous as a composer of motets, and is representative of the generation of composers active in the early to middle 16th century who anticipated the style of Palestrina. L'Héritier was one of the leading figures in disseminating the Franco-Flemish style in Italy in the early 16th-century, along with Willaert. Since L'Héritier was mainly a composer of sacred music, and worked in Rome, leaving numerous compositions in the Vatican archive, he may have been one of the most influential northern musicians on the development of the later Palestrina style. In addition, since his work appears in numerous manuscripts of the 16th century—at least 66, as well as 45 printed collections—and in areas as far apart as Spain, Austria, Bohemia, and Poland, in addition to France and Italy—his influence seems to have been considerable
Herman, Jerry
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Hermann, Friedrich
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Hermanson, Ake
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Hermsdorf, Dieter
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Hermstedt, Johann Simon
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29 Dec. 1778
Germany
10 Aug. 1846
Germany
one of the most famous German clarinettists of the early 19th century. He served as court clarinettist to Duke Günther I of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen, and taught the Duke to play the clarinet. All four of Louis Spohr's clarinet concertos and several of his other clarinet works, as well as Carl Maria von Weber's Grand duo concertant, were written with Hermstedt's skills in mind and dedicated to him. Hermstedt also composed a few works for wind instruments himself
Hernández, Rafael
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24 Oct. 1892
Aguadilla, Puerto Rico
11 Dec. 1965
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Puerto Rican composer
Hernandez Moncada, Eduardo
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Herold, Ferdinand
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Herold, Johannes
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Herrad of Landsbergfl. 1167-1195 her encyclopedia, Hortus deliciarum, (Garden of Delights), ends on a festive note with a collection of chants and hymns
Herrera, Juan de
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Herrera, Tomas de
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Herrick, Joseph
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Herrlinger, Kurt
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Herrmann, Bernard
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29 Jun 1911
New York City, USA
24 Dec. 1975
USA
Herrmann studied composition at the Juilliard School. He went on to become a composer and conductor in New York and emerged as a well-known champion of contemporary music. He became the conductor of the CBS Radio Orchestra, holding a similar position to Arturo Toscanini at NBC. In addition, Herrmann also scored hundreds (perhaps thousands) of CBS radio shows, where his music went into the library and was used repeatedly, even decades later on television. Through his radio work, Herrmann became involved with Orson Welles, and when Welles moved to Hollywood to begin work on his first feature, he took Herrmann as part of his troupe, beginning Herrmann's career as a film composer. Some of Herrmann's best-known work is his earliest. Citizen Kane (RKO, 1941) was released the same year as All That Money Can Buy (RKO, 1941), which won him his only Academy Award and beat out the established Hollywood crowd of Alfred Newman, Miklos Rozsa, Max Steiner and Franz Waxman. Kane was followed up by The Magnificent Ambersons (RKO, 1942). Ambersons was eventually re-edited by the studio, which cut his music significantly and completely replaced some of it. Beginning with The Trouble with Harry and The Man Who Knew Too Much (both Universal, 1956), and continuing with The Wrong Man (Warner, 1957), Vertigo (Universal, 1958), North by Northwest (MGM, 1959), and Psycho (Universal, 1960). Herrmann's last scores for Hitchcock were The Birds (Universal, 1963) (although not really a musical score, Herrmann is credited with overseeing the sound design, which is based on electronic bird sounds), Marnie (Universal, 1964), and finally Torn Curtain (Universal, 1966)
Herrmann, Hugo
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Hersant, Philippe
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Herschel, William (Friedrich Wilhelm)
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15 Nov. 1738
Hanover, Germany
25 Aug. 1822
Slough, England
until the age of 40, William Herschel was a prolific composer. Although much of his music is now lost and much of what is known is rarely performed, his musical repertoire ranged between symphonies, chamber music and choral works. He wrote for instruments as diverse as the organ, flute, cello, viola and harpsichord. He was also an outstanding astronomer, who became famous for discovering the planet Uranus, and a mathematician. He held the position of President of the Royal Astronomical Society and was a pioneer in celestial photography, and in the wave theory of light
Herschel Hill, Anthony
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Hersh, Fred
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Hertel, Johann Wilhelm
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Hervey, Frederick Alfred
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Herville, Mlle  composer who was published in Paris in 1710
Herwich, Christiaen
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Herz, Heinrich
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6 (or 8) Jan. 1806
Vienna, Austria
5 Jan. 1888
Paris, France
Austrian pianist, composer and establisher of a manufactory in France
[entry suggested by Arne Halbakken]
Herzog, Johann Georg
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Herzogenberg, Elisabeth von Stockhausen1847
Germany
1892published pianist and composer. Her home was a meeting place for composers
Herzogenberg, Heinrich von
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Hesdin, Nicolle des Celliers d'
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Heseltine, Philip (see Warlock, Peter)   
Hesketh, Kenneth
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Hespos, Hans Joachim
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Hess, Nigel
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  a composer of attractive and distinctive TV theme music; that for the crime series Hetty Wainthrop Investigates, starring Patricia Routledge, has been taken up by brass bands (for which medium it was written) as a concert item. Other TV scores include those for Maigret, Wycliffe and the irresistible theme music, redolent of Thirties dance music, for Just William. Hess's concert band music includes Stephenson's Rocket, an addition to the still growing corpus of "train music"; he has also written the score for the musical Rats!
Hesse, Adolf Friedrich30 Aug. 1809
Breslau, Germany
05 Aug. 1863
Breslau, Germany
important organist in Germany who was also conductor of the Theaterkapelle of Breslau. His works include 6 symphonies, an oratorio and approximately 82 major works for organ
[information provided by Tony Staes]
Hesse, Hermann
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Hesse, Johann Heinrich
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Hessen, Moritz von
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Hessenberg, Kurt
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Hettisch, Johann
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1748
Liblin, Bohemia
after 1788distinguished as a remarkable Violoncellist, he was educated at the Piaristi College at Sehlan, and then went to Prague in order to train as a musician. There he still was in the year 1772, Later, and indeed in 1788, he was employed at Lemberg in the Imperial civil service, from which it appears that in the flower of his age he had abandoned the practice of Art as a vocation. His playing seems to have been distinguished especially for its rich tone. According to Fetis, he left several Concertos and Cello Solos in manuscript
Hétu, Jacques Joseph Robert
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8 Aug. 1938
Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada
9 Feb. 2010
Saint-Hippolyte, Quebec, Canada
Canadian composer
Heuberger, Richard
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Heusen, James van
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Heusinger, Detlef
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Heykens, Jonny
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Heymann, Werner Richard
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Heymissen, Philippe van
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c.1590
Bois-le-Duc (‘s Hertogenbosch)
 Flemish composer and organist
Heyral, Marc
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Hicks, Geoffrey
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Hidalgo, Juan I
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Hidalgo, Manuel
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Hidas, Frigyes
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Hietala, Timo
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23 Nov. 1960
Finland
 Finnish composer and keyboard player who has worked in the genres of jazz, rock and Latin music as well as composing for symphony orchestra, theatre and film
Higgins, Gavin
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Higginson, Kit
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Hiidenkari, Petri1957
Finland
 composer whose best-known work Hommage à C.D. (1985) for violin and piano which can be best described as Neo-Impressionist
Hijmans, Olivier
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Hilario, Alan
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Hildebrand, Johann I
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Hildebrandt, Herbert
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Hildegarde of Bingen
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16 Sep. 1098
Germany
17 Sep. 1179
Bingen, Germany
abbess and a creative and prolific composer who wrote over 70 compositions. Her gifts included prophecy, composing the first morality play in the Western world, poetry, philosophy and compiling a compendium of herbals for healing
Hill, Alfred
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Hill, Andrew
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Hillborg, Anders
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Hiller, Ferdinand
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24 Oct. 1811
Frankfurt-am-Main
12 May 1885
Cologne, Germany
German composer of the romantic era. Hiller frequently visited England. He composed a work for the opening of the Royal Albert Hall, his Nala and Damayanti was performed at Birmingham, and he gave a series of piano recitals of his own compositions at the Hanover Square Rooms in 1871. He had a perfect mastery over technique and form in musical composition, but his works are generally dry. He was a sound pianist and teacher, and occasionally a brilliant writer on musical matters. His compositions, numbering about two hundred, include six operas, two oratorios, six or seven cantatas, much chamber music and a once-popular piano concerto
Hiller, Johann Adam
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Hiller, Lejaren
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Hiller, Wilfried
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Hilmarsson, Hilmar
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Hilton, John
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before 1601
England
Mar. 1657
London, England
English organist and composer
Himes, William
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1949 American music teacher, euphoniumist, composer and conductory
Hindemith, Paul
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16 Nov. 1895
Hanau, Germany
28 Dec. 1963
Frankfurt, Germany
taught the violin as a child, he left home at the age of eleven because his parents objected to his musical ambitions. He studied conducting, composition and violin under Arnold Mendelssohn and Bernhard Sekles, supporting himself by playing in dance bands and musical-comedy outfits. He led the Frankfurt Opera orchestra from 1915 to 1923 and played in the Rebner string quartet in 1921 in which he played second violin, and later the viola. In 1929 he founded the Amar Quartet, playing viola, and extensively touring Europe. In 1922, some of his pieces were heard in the International Society for Contemporary Music festival at Salzburg, which first brought him to the attention of an international audience. The following year, he began to work as an organiser of the Donaueschingen Festival, where he programmed works by several avant garde composers, including Anton Webern and Arnold Schoenberg. From 1927 he taught composition at Berlin and in the 1930s he made several visits to Ankara where he led the task of reorganising Turkish music education. Towards the end of the 1930s, he made several tours of America as a viola and viola d'amore soloist. Despite protests from the conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler, his music was condemned as "degenerate" by the Nazis, and in 1940 he emigrated to the USA, where he taught music at Yale University (Professor of Music at Yale from 1940 to 1953) and Harvard, and influenced younger American composers such as Harold Shapero. He became an American citizen in 1946, but returned to Europe in 1953, living in Zürich and teaching at the University there. Towards the end of his life he began to conduct more. He was awarded the Balzan Prize in 1962
Hindle, John
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1761
Westminster, London, England
1796English singer and composer, a lay vicar of Westminster Abbey
Hindson, Matthew
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1968 Australian composer
Hine, William
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16871730English organist and composer
Hines, Earl
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28 Dec. 1903
Duquesne, Pennsylvania, USA
22 Apr. 1983
Oakland, California, USA
universally known as Earl "Fatha" Hines, one of a small number of pianists whose playing shaped the history of jazz
Hinrichs, Marie1828
Germany
1891composer of songs
Hintz (Hinsch), Ewaldt
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Danzig, Germany (now Poland)after c.1666German organist and composer who was a pupil of Froberger
Hiorthoy, Kim
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1973
Norway
 Norwegian electronic musician, graphic designer and composer
Hirose, Ryohei
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1930
Hokkaido, Japan
24 Nov. 2008
Japan
Japanese composer. His works include instrumental, choral, and electronic compositions, as well as pieces for renaissance and traditional Japanese instruments
Hirota, Joji
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second half of twentieth century percussionist, Japanese taiko drummer, shakuhachi flautist, singer and composer
Hirs, Rozalie
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7 Apr. 1965
Gouda, The Netherlands
 Dutch composer of mostly chamber, vocal and electroacoustic works
Hirsch, Hugo
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12 Mar. 1884
Birnbaum, Germany
16 Aug. 1961
Berlin, Germany
prolific composer of operetta and revue who, after a glittering period as one of the stalwarts of Berlin Operette, left Germany in 1933 with his wife, living at various times in England, Belgium and France. Although, in the 1950s, he returned to Berlin and two of his operetta were filmed, he died in 1961 virtually unknown. His works include Bummelmädel (1911), Tangofieber (1912), Die Hoflieferantin (1913), Die ewige Braut (1917), Die Scheidungsreise (1918), Eine feine Familie (1918), Die erste Nacht (1919), Dolli (1920), Der Fürst von Pappenheim (1921), Senora (1922), Die tolle Lola (1923), Wenn man verliebt ist (1923), Das hat die Welt noch nicht gesehn (1924, Revue), Der blonde Traum (1924), Monsieur Troulala (1925), Wieder Metropol (1926, Revue), Berlin ist Mode (1927, Revue), Fräulein Mama (1928), Un vent de Folie (1929, Revue) and La Danseuse Espagnole (1930)
Hirsch, Karl
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Hirsch, Michael
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Hisaishi, Joe
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Hlobil, Emil
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Hnatishin, Andrei
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Hock, Theodor
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Hodell, Ake
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Hoddinott, Alun
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11 Aug. 1929
Bargoed, Wales
12 Mar. 2008, Swansea, WalesWelsh composer
Hodeir, Andre
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Hodemont, Leonard de
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Hodes, Karl Heinrich
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Hodges, Faustina Hasse 1822
Philadelphia, USA
1895an organist and soloist. Her song Rose Bud sold over 100,000 copies
Hoedt, Henry Georges d'
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28 Jun. 1885
Ghent, Belgium
14 May 1936
Brussels, Belgium
Belgian composer
Hoenderdos, Margriet
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Hoey, Gustaaf van
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26 Oct. 1835
Malines, Belgium
18 Jan. 1913
Malines, Blegium
Belgian composer and organist
Hofer, Andreas
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Hoffman, Joel
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Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor (Wilhelm) Amadeus
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24 Jan. 1776
Königsberg, East Prussia, Prussia
25 Jun. 1822
Berlin, Brandenburg, Prussia
better known by his pen name E. T. A. Hoffmann, a Romantic author of fantasy and horror, a jurist, composer, music critic, draftsman and caricaturist. Hoffmann's stories were tremendously influential in the 19th century, and he is one of the key authors of the Romantic movement
Hoffmann, Johann
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Hoffmann, Leopold
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Hoffmann, Melchior
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Hoffmann, Norbert
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1916
Luxembourg
 composer from Luxembourg
Hoffmeister, Franz Anton
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12 May 1754
Rothenburg am Neckar
9 Feb. 1812
Vienna, Austria
Austrian music publisher and composer
Hoffstetter, Roman
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Hofhaimer, Paul
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25 Jan. 1459
Radstadt, nr. Salzburg, Austria
1537
Salzburg, Austria
an Austrian organist and composer. He was particularly gifted at improvisation, and was regarded as the finest organist of his age by many writers, including Vadian and Paracelsus; in addition he was one of the only German-speaking composers of the time who had a reputation in Europe outside of German-speaking countries
Hofmann, Josef
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Hofmann, Leopold
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Hogberg, Fredrik
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Hoglund, Ola
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Hohne, Carl
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Hoijer, Anne Ovena  composer who published in Amsterdam in 1650
Hoir, Bernard L'
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Hoir, Joseph d'
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Hojsgaard, Erik
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Hol, Richard
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Hol, Rijk
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Holborne, Antony
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c.1545
England
1602
probably London, England
a composer of English consort music during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I
Holborne, William
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fl. 1597
England
 brother of Anthony Holborne. Six of William's madrigals were included in the Cittarn Schoole (1597)
Holbrooke, Joseph Perry
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18221888hymn composer. Tunes composed include Bible Song, Bishop, Clinton, Miriam and Refuge, the later being used as an alternate tune for Jesus, Lover Of My Soul
Holcomb, Robin
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Hold, Trevor James
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Northampton
21 September 1939
Wadenhoe, Northamptonshire 28 January 2004 composer, musicologist and poet: Assistant Lecturer in Music, University College of Wales, Aberystwyth 1963-65; Lecturer in Music, Liverpool University 1965-70; Lecturer, then Senior Lecturer in Music, Department of Adult Education, Leicester University 1970-89; his setting of Laurie Lee's 'Day of these Days' won the English Poetry and Song Society/English Music Society 2002 Golden Jubilee Song Competition.
Holiday, Billie
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Holland, Dave
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Holland, Jan Dawid
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Holland, Justin
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26 Jul. 1819
Virginia, USA
24 Mar. 1887
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
African American guitarist, composer and teacher
Hollander, Friedrich
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Hollander, Hermannus
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Hollander, Victor
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Hollenburg, Lupold
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Holler, Karl
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Holler, York
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Holliger, Heinz
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Hollins, Alfred
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Hollmer, Lars
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Holloway, Robin
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Holman, Bill
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Holman, George
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Holmboe, Vagn
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Holmes, Augusta
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Holmes, John
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Holohan, Michael
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Holszky, Adriana
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Holst, Gustav
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21 Sep. 1874
Cheltenham, England
25 May 1934
London, England
English composer. He is most famous for his orchestral suite The Planets. His music was influenced by Indian spiritualism and English folk tunes, and is well known for unconventional use of meter and haunting melodies. He was the father of the composer and conductor Imogen Holst
Holst, Imogen
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12 Apr. 1907
London, England
9 Mar. 1984
Aldeburgh, Suffolk, England
daughter of Gustav Holst, conductor and composer
Holt, Simeon ten
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Holt, Simon
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Holten, Bo
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Hölttö, Keira
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9 Apr. 1956
Rovaniemi, Finland
 a composer emigrated to Sweden in the early 1990s, combines Post-Serialist complexity with aleatoric counterpoint in his output, which mainly consists of instrumental music
Holý, Alfred
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5 Aug. 1886
Oporto, Portugal
6 May 1948
Vienna, Austria
Portuguese-born, Czech harpist and composer
Holyoke, Samuel
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Holzbauer, Ignaz Jakob
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Holzel, Johann
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Holzmann, Abe
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Homero
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Homilius, Gottfried August
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Homler, Anna
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Homs Oller, Joaquim
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Honauer, Leontzi
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Hondt, Cornelius Canis de (or d'Hondt) (see Canis, Cornelius)   
Hondt, Gheerkin de
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Honegger, Oscar-Arthur (Arthur)
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10 Mar. 1892
Le Havre, France
27 Nov. 1955
Paris, France
Swiss composer, who was born in France and lived a large part of his life in Paris. He was a member of Les Six. His most frequently performed work is probably the orchestral work Pacific 231, which imitates the sound of a steam locomotive
Honey, Paul
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Hongisto, Mauri1921
Finland
2001composer who wrote in a traditional key-oriented tonality
Honkanen, Antero1941
Finland
 Finnish composer who has worked with electronic music
Honkanen, Osmo
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6 May 1964
Finland
 a church organist in Helsinki and a composer of sacred vocal music; he has also written organ works and instrumental music
Honsinger, Tristan
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Hoof, Jean-Baptiste Van
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1755
Lierre, Belgium
5 Feb. 1813
possibly Anvers
Belgian composer and violinist
Hoof, Jef Van
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8 May 1886
Anvers, Belgium
24 Apr. 1959
Anvers, Belgium
conductor and composer, van Hoof was a pupil of Gilson and was very much influenced by him. The popularity of his songs and choral pieces put him in a position to become the leading Belgian composer of his generation. As the leading proponent of Belgian choral music, van Hoof dedicated much time to organizing and conducting at the Flemish Song Festival
Hooft, Pieter Cornelis
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Hook, James
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17461827Hook became organist of Marylebone Gardens in 1769, but moved to Vauxhall as keyboard player and composer (1772-1821). He wrote over two thousand songs for Vauxhall, and played organ concertos on many thousands of occasions
Hope, Elmo
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Hope, Peter
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Hopkins, Bill
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Hopkins, Edward John
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Hopkins, John Henry
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Hopkins, Sarah
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Hopkinson, Francis
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2 Oct. 1737
Philadelphia, USA
9 May 1791
Philadelphia, USA
an American author, and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey, he was also a guitarist and composer of songs, among which may be mentioned The Treaty, The Battle of the Kegs, and The New Roof, a song for Federal Mechanics
Hopper, Harold
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Horecki , Feliks (or Felix Horetzky)
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1 Jan. 1796
Horyszów Ruski, Poland
6 Oct. 1887
Edingurgh, Scotland
guitarist, composer and teacher who was a student of Giuliani
Horn, Mr.
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fl. 1828 composer of vaudevilles
Horne, David
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Horneman, Christian
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Horner, James
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Horovitz, Joseph
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Horowitz, Joshua
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Horsley, Charles Edward
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16 Dec. 1822
London, England
1876
New York, NY, USA
son of William Horsley, enjoyed a certain reputation as a musician. He studied in Germany under Hauptmann and Mendelssohn, and on his return to England composed several oratorios and other pieces, none of which had permanent success. In 1868 he emigrated to Australia, and in 1872 went to America; he died in New York
Horsley, William
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15 Nov. 1774
England
12 Jun. 1858
London, England
composer, organist and founder of the Philharmonic Society, famous for his glees, of which five volumes were published in the early years of the 19th century. It was through his position as organist to the Asylum for Female Orphans at Dulwich that he became a close friend of the composer John Wall Callcott, whose eldest daughter he married in 1813. William Horsley's compositions were much admired by the young Mendelssohn, who became a family friend and frequent visitor at the Horsley's home, 1 High Row, Kensington, London
Horst, Anthon van der
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Horsthuis, Maurice
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Hortense, Queen of Holland (Hortense Beauharnais)1783
Paris, France
1837published an album of her songs in Paris and author of the once popular national French air, Partant pour le Syrie
Horton, Joseph
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fl. 1828-1849 violinist and composer associated with Vauxhall Gardens, London
Horusitzky, Zoltan
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Horvitz, Wayne
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Horvath, Geza
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Horwood, William
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 148415th century English composer. A singer at Lincoln Cathedral in 1470 and vicar choral at Lincoln in 1476 and choirmaster from 1477 until 1484 (obviously the year of his death because it was then that the administration of his goods was given to one of the other vicars). He is known by four pieces in the Eton Choirbook (one is incomplete) and another incomplete piece in a York MS
Hoser, Otto
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Hosokawa, Toshio
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Hotman (or Hautman), Nicolasc.1610
Brussels, Belgium
1663
Paris, France
Belgian-born viol player and composer who spent many years working and living in France. Hotman shared the position of the viol player to the King of France with Sébastien Le Camus. Jean Rousseau, pupil of Sainte-Colombe, later praised in his Traité de la Viole (1687) both Hotman and Le Camus as "the two best players of the viol and theorbo that the King had ever heard"
Hotteterre, Jacques
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Hough, Stephen
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Houghton, Phillip
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Houtkamp, Luc
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4 Dec. 1953
The Netherlands
  Luc Houtkamp is a virtuoso saxophonist and composer who has developed an array of extended saxophone techniques. He feels that one aspect that particularly typifies his playing is a strong understanding of form and structure that give the impression that his music is a completely composed one. Since 1985 he has also become active as a composer of electronic and computer music. In his electronic work, the use of self developed interactive computer programmes play an important role.
In Houtkamp's computer based work, a computer programme assumes the role of an improvising listener and co-musician. The computer analyses sound input from the live performer and controls MIDI gear, either synthesizers or sound processing devices modifying the live player's sound. The software allow the computer to "listen" and respond to a live instrumental improviser.
Houtkamp often chooses idiosyncratic voices for his computer music. His digital partners are player pianos and harmonizers, rather than synthesizers. Thus the human musician is accompanied by a real acoustic piano (one that appears to be played by an invisible player) or the musician's own instrument transposed and transformed into fresh melody lines. This results in music that deflects the technology of its production and ends up sounding new but familiar at the same time.
Through this software, a real synthesis between improvisation and composition is achieved. The computer provides a rigid framework within which the acoustic musician is fully free to develop his improvisations. In turn, the musician can direct the computer through his musical instructions. Since 2000 Houtkamp mainly performs his music with his own computer chamber group: The POW Ensemble.
The main links to his music are:
Houtman, Ad
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Hove, Fred van
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1937
Antwerp, Belgium
 pianist, accordionist, church organist and composer
Hove, Joachim (Joachimus) van den
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1567
Antwerp, Belgium
1620
The Hague, The Netherlands
lutenist, composer and teacher whose intabulations of other composers works often included divisions and variations of his own. Around a hundred lute solos of his own composition have survived
Hove, Luc van
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3 Feb. 1957
Wilrijk, Belgium
 Belgian pianist, teacher and composer
Hoven, Johann (real name Vesque von Püttlingen)
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23 Jul 1803
Opole, Poland
30 Oct. 1883
Vienna, Austria
civil servant and composer
Hovhaness, Alan
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Hovland, Egil
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Howard, James Newton
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Howard, Michael II
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Howard, Rowland
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Howard, Samuel
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fl. 1765 English song-writer
Howarth, Elgar
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Howells, Herbert
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17 Oct. 1892
Lydney, Gloucs., England
23 Feb. 1983
London, England
taught composition at the Royal College of Music which has a distinguished tradition of composer-teachers going back to Parry and Stanford. Howells was also associated with the University of London. He was appointed King Edward VII Professor, a somewhat anomalous position, since the University did not have a music faculty. Like Vaughan Williams, Howells' musical taste was for the English folk idiom, and for music of the sixteenth century, which in Howells' case led to a contrapuntal approach to music. Howells and Vaughan Williams were colleagues at the Royal College of Music; Vaughan Williams taught composition there from 1919 and Howells joined him the following year. Howells seems to have lacked the self-promotional skills necessary for success as a composer, and few of his works were widely performed. But a handful of his works have become classics. For those familiar with the church repertoire, he is one of the major English composers of the century. He wrote the only substantial and successful body of music this century for the clavichord with the collections Lambert's Clavichord and Howells' Clavichord. There is some fine music for organ, the instrument which was his primary study
Howgill, William
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Hoyoul, Balduin
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Hrabovsky, Leonid
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28 Jan. 1935
Kiev, Russia
 in the mid-1960s, together with Valentin Silvestrov and Vitaly Hodziatsky, Hrabovsky helped initiate a movement for musical experiment. These three composers (the Kiev group) were among the first in the former USSR to explore graphic notation, new instrumental techniques, musique concrète and serial procedures. Providing one of the most serious challenges to the aesthetic norms of socialist realism, they had a part in provoking heated disputes within the Soviet Composers' Union
Hristic, Stevan18851958received his musical education in Leipzig, Moscow, Rome and Paris. He was the director of the Belgrade Philharmonic and the Belgrade Opera. He showed a special inclination for vocal music, composing technically cultivated works in the neo-romantic, veristic and romanticist-impressionist styles, sometimes coloured with traditional folk melodies. The chamber opera Twilight (1925) faithfully renders old patrician Dubrovnik, and the ballet Legend of Ohrid (1947) owed its popularity to Serbian and Macedonian folklore, to its remarkable melodies, to its unusual rhythms and sophisticated orchestration. His church music showed a Russian influence (e.g., Requiem in F-sharp minor)
Hristov, Dobre
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Hrostwitha, Sister935
Germany
1000
Germany
nun of the Abbey of Gandersheim who wrote poetry, music and drama
Hubay, Jenö
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15 Sep. 1858
Pest, Hungary
12 Mar. 1937
Budapest, Hungary
Hungarian violinist, composer and music teacher. Although born into a German family of musicians, with the name Eugen Huber, during his twenties, while living in the French-speaking world, he chose to adopt a Hungarian style for his name
Hubbard, Freddie
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Huber, Hans
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Huber, Klaus
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Huber, Nicolaus A
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Huber, Paul
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Huber, Rupert
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Hubler, Klaus K
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Hubner, Peter
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Hucbald (Hucbaldus, Hubaldus)
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c.840
Tournai, France
20 Jun. 930
Tournai, France
music theorist, composer, teacher, writer, hagiographer, and Benedictine monk. He wrote the first systematic work on western music theory, incorporating the differences between contemporary and ancient practice
Huchyn, Nicholas
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fl. 15th century composer of a setting of Salve regina that appears in the Eton Choirbook
Hudson, Mary 1801
London, UK
organist at St. Olave’s and St. Gregory’s in London. She also composed hymns and other church music
Huet, Gregorio
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Hufschmidt, Wolfgang
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Huggens, Ted (see van Lijnschooten, Hendrikus Corneli (Henk))   
Hughes, Edward Dudley (Ed)
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1968
Bristol, UK
 studied at Cambridge University with Robin Holloway and Alexander Goehr and at Southampton University with Michael Finnissy. Commissions include London Sinfonietta, Sinfonia 21, Opus 20, Bath Camerata, Arts Council (South West) and the Brighton Festival who commissioned a live surround-sound score for Sergei Eisenstein's 1925 masterpiece, Battleship Potemkin, which was premièred at the 2005 Festival
Hughes, Herbert
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1882
Belfast, Northern Ireland
1937Hughes grew up in Belfast and completed his studies with C.V. Stanford at the Royal College of Music, London, in 1901. In 1903, he was a founder member of the Irish Folk Song Society of London and co-editor of its Journal. From 1911 to 1932 he was the music critic of the Daily Telegraph. Hughes was an active folk-song collector and collected more than 1,000 melodies, most of them unpublished. Many of these able arrangements deserve high merits for their impressionist qualities. His most important volumes were the Irish Country Songs which appeared in 1909, 1915, 1934 and 1936
Hughes, Ian
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1958 an established writer and arranger of orchestral scores for film and television as well as a number of well known popular performers. His credits include Amii Stewart, Marti Webb, Bonnie Langford, Martine McCutchenson, The Early Adventures of Indiana Jones, EastEnders, Poldark and Flying Through History
Hugues, Luigi
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Hui, Melissa
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Hullah, John Pike
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27 Jun. 1812
Worcester, England
27 Feb. 1884
London, England
composer and Professor of Vocal Music at King's College from 1843 until 1874. He trained at the Royal Academy of Music and achieved an early success co-writing a comic opera with Charles Dickens entitled The Village Coquettes, which ran from 1836-1837. Hullah composed numerous songs and operas but achieved lasting distinction as a leading advocate of the reform of music teaching, in particular by popularising Wilhem's method of teaching song in which the untutored and groups could easily participate. Hullah lectured on the method in Battersea, Manchester at several leading public schools including Winchester and Eton and was instrumental, in conjunction with other King's luminaries including Frederick Maurice, in the foundation of Queen's College in Harley Street in 1848, one of the earliest such educational institutions for women. He was organist at Charterhouse from 1858 and from 1872 was musical inspector of training schools for the Royal Academy of Music. One of Hullah's daughters, Mary, became a noted author
Hullebroeck, Emiel
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Hullmandel, Nicolas Joseph
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Hulse, Camil van
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1 Aug. 1897
Saint-Nicolas (Flandre Orientale)
 Belgian composer and organist
Humair, Daniel
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Hume, Carolyn
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Hume, James Ord
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Hume, Tobias
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Humfrey, Pelham
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1647
England
14 Jul. 1674
England
the first to prominence of the new generation of English composers at the beginning of the Restoration. He died at the age of 27, but exerted a strong influence on his peers even at his young age, including Henry Purcell and John Blow
Hummel, Franz
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Hummel, Johann Nepomuk
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14 Nov. 1778
Bratislava, Slovakia
17 Oct. 1837
Weimar, Germany
composer and virtuoso pianist of Austrian origin who was born in Bratislava (present-day Slovakia). His music reflects the transition from the Classical to the Romantic musical era
Humperdinck, Engelbert
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1 Sep. 1854
Siegburg, Germany
27 Sep. 1921
Neustrelitz, Germany
a German composer, best known for his opera, Hänsel und Gretel (1893). Humperdinck was greatly influenced by Richard Wagner, and worked as his assistant. In his opera Königskinder, Humperdinck became the first composer to use Sprechgesang, a vocal technique halfway between singing and speaking, and later exploited by Arnold Schoenberg
Humpert, Hans
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Humpert, Hans Ulrich
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Humulescu, Evghenie
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Hundt, Aline1849
Germany
1873one of Liszt’s finest pupils. She conducted her ‘Symphony in G’ at its premiere in Berlin in 1871. It was reported that every man was disgusted because she was allowed to conduct the orchestra herself
Hunnis, William
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 6 Jun. 1597
England
English Protestant poet, dramatist, and composer. He was a gentleman of the Chapel Royal to Edward VI, but was imprisoned during the reign of Mary for plotting against her regime and narrowly escaped execution. After the accession of Elizabeth he was released, and in 1566 made "master of the children" of the Chapel Royal
Hunsberger, Donald
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Hunt, Dave
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Hunt, Jerry
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Hunt, John
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18061842organist and composer, who succeeded Samuel Wesley as organist to Hereford Cathedral
Hunt, Richard
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Hunten, Franz
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Hunter, Alberta
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1 Apr. 1895
Memphis, USA
17 Oct. 1984
New York, USA
a celebrated African-American jazz singer, songwriter and nurse
Hunter, Ann(e)1742
Scotland
1821she wrote a number of songs and also the words to Haydn’s Twelve Canzonettas
Huppertz, Gottfried
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11 Mar. 1887
Köln, Germany
7 Feb. 1937
Berlin, Germany
composer noted particularly for his music for films directed by Fritz Lang, songs and theatre music
[information supplied by Aitam Bar-Sagi]
Hurd, Michael (John)
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19 Dec. 1928
Gloucester, UK
8 Aug. 2006English composer and writer
Huré, Jean18771930French organist and composer, he studied with Guilmant and Gigout. In 1925 he was appointed organist of the Église Saint-Augustin in Paris. Among a number of works for orchestra and chamber music, he published only a few compositions for organ
Hurel, Philippe
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Hurford, Peter
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Hurh, Bang-ja
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Hurlebusch, Konrad Friedrich
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Hurley, Donal
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Hurlstone, William
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Hurtado, Miguel
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Hurtado, Pedro
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Hurum, Alf
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Hurum, Helge1936
Norway
 a composer who draws his inspiration from Norwegian nature and folk tunes, Hurum's music is accessible, lyrical and often elegiac. For this reason his music is popular with school and community bands. Among his works meriting closer attention are Eventus (10'30), Adagio for Winds (4'45), Concita for Band (5'15) and Capriccio & Canzone (11'30). Band works with soloists are Contrasts for trumpet (6'), Sketches for Oboe and Band, and Ballade for Alto Sax and Band, for which he received 1st prize in the European Broadcasting Union's Band Music Competition in 1987. Hurum has also written several works for band and choir: Folklore (7'30) and Vind Fer Vide (15'20). Pulsare (10') is a 2-movement work and was commissioned by the Norwegian Band Federation as a test piece for the 2000 Norwegian Championships 1st division
Hus, Walter
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Husa, Karel
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Husby, Kare Dyvik
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Husch, Hanns Dieter
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Huss, Henry Holden
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Hussain, Zakir
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Hutcherson, Bobby
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Hutchings, Arthur (James Bramwell)
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14 Jul 19061989composer of church music and two light operas, Hutchings was only marginally a light music composer, being more of an academic, with books published on Schubert, Edmund Rubbra, Delius, Mozart, the Baroque Concerto and 19th Century Church Music, although many of these were aimed as much at the general reader as at the musical scholar, Hutchings was Professor at Durham University 1947-68 and at Exeter from 1968 to 1970
Hutchinson, Asa Burnham
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18231884American singer, particularly as a member of the Hutchinson Family Singers, and composer who during the American Civil War popularized the Union song, The Battle Cry of Freedom, which was composed by George F. Root and Tenting on the Old Camp Ground by Walter Kittredge. Asa also deserves a good share of the credit for the widespread circulation of Henry Clay Work's classic song, Kingdom Coming. A few of Asa's songs, such as Hannah's at the Window Binding Shoes and The Creed of the Bells, outlived him by years, even decades
Hutschenruijter, Wouter sr
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Hutschenruijter, Wouter jr
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Huttenbrenner, Anselm
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Hutterott, Carl Theodor
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Huybrechts, Albert
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Huygens, Constantyn
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Huylebroeck, Jan
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Huysman, Roelof (see Rodolphus Agricola)   
Huzella, Elek
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Hyde, Miriam
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Hye (la), Louise Genevieve1810
France
1838
France
entered Paris Conservatoire at age 11 and was professor of harmony there before she died at age 28
Hygons, Richard
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c.1435c.1509
Wells, Somerset
an English composer of the early Renaissance. While only two compositions of this late 15th-century composer have survived, one of them, a five-voice setting of the Salve Regina Marian antiphon, has attracted interest from musicologists because of its close relationship to music being written at the same time on the continent, as well as its high level of workmanship
Hykes, David
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Hykes, J W
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Hyldgaard, Soren
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Hyman, Dick
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Hyvärinen, Asko
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27 Jul. 1963
Haapavesi, Finland
 Finnish composer who can be described as a Modernist