composers biography : M - Mz
 



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NameBornDiedInformation
Maal, Baaba
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12 Nov. 1953
Podor, Senegal
 Senegalese singer and guitarist, who, in addition to acoustic guitar, also plays percussion. He has released several albums, both for independent and major labels. In July 2003, he was made a UNDP Youth Emissary
Maasalo, Armas28 Aug. 1885
Rautavaara, Finland
9 Sep. 1960
Helsinki, Finland
Finnish composer best known for his sacred vocal music
Maasland, Arie (pseudonym: Malando)
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26 May 1908
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
22 Nov. 1980
Bussum, The Netherlands
Dutch composer and musician
Maayani, Ami
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1936
Ramat Gan, Israel
 Israeli composer, teacher and writer on musical matters
Mabarak, Carlos Jiménez
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1916
Tacuba, Mexico
1994
Mexico City, Mexico
composed El paraíso de los ahogados in 1960, considered the first piece involving electroacoustic medias produced by a Mexican composer. He also composed La llorona, ballet music for small orchestra, electronic oscillator, timpani, percussions, piano and strings in 1961, and La portentosa vida de la muerte in 1964
Macbeth, Allen
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13 Mar. 1856
Greenock, Scotland
25 Aug. 1910
Glasgow, Scotland
Macbeth is remembered (if at all) nowadays for his light intermezzo Forget Me Not Opus 22, which quickly made a hit with professional and amateur orchestras (the Doncaster Orchestral Society performed it at a concert on 10 March 1891) and remained in their repertoires for generations. It comes as something of a shock to find that the composer of such a Grand Hotel lollipop studied at Leipzig Conservatory with Reinecke and Jadassohn, conducted the Glasgow Choral Union between 1880 and 1887, held organist's positions in Glasgow and Edinburgh and from 1890 directed the Music School of the Glasgow Athenaeum
MacColl, Ewan (born: James Miller)
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25 Jan. 1915
Broughton, Lancashire, England
22 Oct. 1989
England
a British folk singer, songwriter, socialist, actor, poet, playwright, and record producer. He was the father of singer Kirsty MacColl
MacColl, Kirsty
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10 Oct. 1959
Croydon, England
18 Dec. 2000
Cozumel, Mexico
English singer-songwriter, daughter of Ewan MacColl
MacCunn, Hamish
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22 Mar. 1868
Greenock, Scotland
2 Aug. 1916
London, England
Scottish romantic composer, born the son of a shipowner, who was educated at the Royal College of Music, where his teachers included (Sir) Charles Parry and Charles Villiers Stanford
Macdearmid, Anne
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20th century Aberdeen-born Scottish harpist and composer for the harp
MacDermot, (Arthur Terence) Galt
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18 Dec. 1928
Montreal, Canada
 Canadian pianist, composer and writer of musical theatre
MacDiarmid, George (see Brecht, George)   
MacDonald, Andrew Paul
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30 Nov. 1958
Guelph, Ontario, Canada
 Canadian composer
MacDowell, Edward
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18 Dec. 1860
New York, USA
23 Jan. 1908
New York, USA
making his living chiefly as a piano teacher, while giving concerts that include his own works (First Concerto and Indian Suite were premiered in New York), on May 2, 1896, MacDowell was appointed professor of music at Columbia University and the Department of Music was created. The news was received by the musical public and the University with enthusiasm, for MacDowell was thought, at the time, to be the preeminent American composer and pianist. Funds raised to help him and his wife during his final years went to found the MacDowell Colony. The Colony, in Peterborough, New Hampshire, has become a place of retreat for artists: Aaron Copland composed parts of Appalachian Spring at the Colony; Thornton Wilder wrote Our Town; Virgil Thomson worked on Mother of Us All; Leonard Bernstein completed his Mass. Works of art created by artists while in residence are exhibited in galleries and museums around the world
Macedo Pimentel, Osvaldo Lenine (see Lenine)   
Macfarren, (Sir) George Alexander
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2 Mar. 1813
London, UK
31 Oct. 1887
London, UK
musical author and composer who studied at the Royal Academy and became professor there in 1834
MacFarren, Mrs. John (pseud. Jules Brissac)1824
London
1895published several light piano pieces that enjoyed large sales
MacGimsey, Robert7 Sep. 1898
Pineville, Louisiana, USA
13 Mar. 1979
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
MacGimsey received his musical training at Juilliard. After a brief career as a lawyer, he became a professional whistler, performing on the radio and in recordings. He also pursued a career as a singer and composer. His songs reflected his southern roots, especially the Negro folksongs he heard. His “Sweet Little Jesus Boy” was published in 1934
Mácha, Otmar
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2 Oct. 1922
Ostrava, Czech Republic
 Czech composer
[correction by Terry L. Mueller]
Machado, Celso
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27 Jan. 1953
Ribeiro Preto, Brazil
 Afro-Brazilian composer, guitarist, lyricist and singer.
Machado, Manuel
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c.1590
Lisbon, Portugual
1646
Madrid, Spain
a Portuguese composer and harpist, who was mostly active in Spain, as he was born when Portugal was under Spanish rule
Machajdik, Peter
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1 Jun. 1961
Bratislava, Slovakia
 Slovak composer who has been based in Germany for many years
Machan, Derek
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1974
Wisconsin, USA
 American composer and music educator
Machaut, Guillaume de
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c.1300
nr. Rheims, France
1377
Rheims, France
important Medieval French poet and composer. Guilllaume de Machaut was "the last great poet who was also a composer," in the words of the scholar Daniel Leech-Wilkinson. Well into the 15th century, Machaut's poetry was greatly admired and imitated by other poets including the likes of Geoffrey Chaucer
Mâche, François Bernard
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4 Apr. 1935
Clermont-Ferrand, France
 French composer of electroacoustic, orchestral, chamber, choral, vocal and piano works
Machover, Tod
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24 Nov. 1953
Mount Vernon, New York, USA
 the son of a pianist and a computer scientist, Machover is a composer and an innovator in the application of technology in music
Machy, Le Sieur de
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fl. second half 17th century French viol player, composer, and teacher remembered principally for his Pièces de Violle en Musique et en Tablature (1685), a valuable source of information on the performance practices of his time
Maciejewski, Roman
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28 Feb. 1910, Berlin, Germany20 Apr. 1998
Gotteborg, Sweden
Polish pianist, conductor and composer who studied with Szymanowski and Nadia Boulanger. His compositions include music for ballets, piano works, a concerto and many transcriptions for two pianos, many Masses, and Macbeth and Caligula by Camus. His Requiem is regarded as his finest work although rarely performed as it requires very large performing forces
MacIntyre, David K.
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1952
Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada
 Canadian composer and teacher
Mackeben, Theo
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5 Jan. 1897
Preußisch Stargard, Germany
10 Jan. 1953
Berlin, Germany
German pianist, conductor and composer
Mackenzie, Alexander
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22 Aug. 1847
Edinburgh, Scotland
28 Apr. 1935
London, England
Scottish composer best known for his oratorios, violin and piano pieces and works for the stage
Mackey, Steven
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14 Feb. 1956
Frankfurt, Germany
 American composer, guitarist, and music educator
MacKillop, Rob
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1959
Dundee, Scotland
 Scottish composer, lutenist, theorbist, vihuelist, and guitarist
Maclean, Quentin
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18961962London organist (in both church and theatre), whose popular Parade of the Sunbeams was later orchestrated by Herman Finck
Mackintosh, Robert
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1745
Tullymet, Perthshire, Scotland
1807
London, England
a prolific Scottish composer and well-respected musician and fiddle teacher. He is best remembered for four collections of music containing 357 tunes published by Macintosh from 1783 to 1803
MacLean, Sean
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  American pianist and composer
MacMillan, Ernest
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18 Aug. 1893
Mimico, Toronto, Canada
6 May 1973
Toronto, Canada
Canadian orchestral conductor, organist, painist and composer
MacMillan, James
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Maconchy, Elizabeth
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Macque, Giovanni de (ne Jean de Macque)
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1548/50
Valenciennes
Sep. 1614
possibly Naples, Italy
a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque, who spent almost his entire life in Italy. He was one of the most famous Neapolitan composers of the late 16th century; some of his experimentation with chromaticism was likely influenced by Gesualdo, who was an associate of his
MacRae, Stuart
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Maddelena, Archduchessfl. early 18th century
Germany
 composer
Maderna, Bruno
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21 Apr. 1920
Venice, Italy
13 Nov. 1973
Darmstadt, Germany
an Italian-German orchestra director and 20th century music composer
Madetoja, Leevi (Antti)
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17 Feb. 1887
Oulu, Finland
6 Oct. 1947
Helsinki, Finland
significant Finnish late Romantic symphonic composer. Madetoja's music is often described as very Finnish in its elegiac and melancholy moods yet very French in its elegance and polish. It was at the instigation of composer colleague Toivo Kuula that Madetoja went to Paris to study further in 1910, and later he enjoyed several extensive stays in France. Like Sibelius, Madetoja enacted a sort of internal Classicalization of the Late Romantic style; he never touched upon Neo-Classicism except for the ballet pantomime Okon Fuoko. His opera Pohjalaisia (1924) (The Ostrobothnians) was immensely successful. It was a lightly veiled allegory about the oppression that Finland suffered under the last years of the Russian regime, and its strong national connections served to point the way for other opera composers
Madina, Francisco de
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Madlem, Peter
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Madre de Deus, Filipe da
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Madureira, Antonio
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Mae, Vanessa
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Maes, Jef
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Maessen, Antoon
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Maestro Piero
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before 1300
Italy
shortly after 1350
Italy
Italian composer of the late medieval era. He was one of the first composers of the trecento who is known by name, and probably one of the oldest. He is mainly known for his madrigals
Maeyer, Jan de
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Maffia, Pedro
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Magalhaes, Filipe de
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Maganini, Quinto30 Nov. 1897
Fairfield, CA, USA
10 Mar. 1974
Greenwich, CT, USA
flautist, conductor, composer and arranger. Studied flute with Georges Barrère, professor at the Institute of Musical Art (predecessor of The Juilliard School) and composition with Nadia Boulanger. In 1927 he won a Pulitzer traveling scholarship for his opera The Argonauts. From 1940 to 1967, Magnini was conductor and music director of the Norwalk Symphony Orchestra, presenting the Symphony’s first youth concerts and premiered several new compositions, including his own, successfully developing audience interest in newer music. Guest soloists with the orchestra were drawn both from the local scene, as were artists that were developing their careers including Yo Yo Ma, ltzhak Pearlman and Emanuel Ax
Magdic, Josip
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Mage, Pierre du
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Magi, Ester
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Magidenko, Olga
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9 May 1954
Moscow, Russia
 Russian pianist and composer
Magle, Frederik
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Magnard, Alberic
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Magnante, Charles
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7 Dec. 1905
New York City, NY, USA
30 Dec. 1986
USA
American accordionist, who, at the peak of his career, was doing as many as thirty one radio broadcasts and an average of about eight recording dates in a single week. His audiences ranged from small intimate groups to packed auditoriums of three thousand. At the Civic Stadium in Buffalo, NY, he played for an audience of over forty thousand people. One of Magnante's best known compositions is the novelty solo Accordiana which he composed in exactly twenty minutes. His textbooks, arrangements, and original compositions are numbered by the hundreds and include popular, classical, jazz and boogie-woogie
Magne, Michel
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Magomayev (or Mahomayev), Abdul Muslim Magometovic18 Sep. 1885
Grozny, Chechnya
28 Jul. 1937
Baku, Azerbaijan
a contemporary of Uzeyir Hajibeyov and deeply involved in documenting Azerbaijani folksongs throughout the countryside. Muslim is remembered most for two operas Shah Ismayil (1917) and Nargiz (1935)
Mahaut, Antoine
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Mahle, Ernst
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Mahler, Alma Maria (née Schindler)
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31 Aug. 1879
Vienna, Austria
11 Dec. 1964
New York, USA
composer and painter, was noted in her native Vienna for her beauty and intelligence. She was the wife, successively, of one of the century's leading composers (Gustav Mahler), architects (Walter Gropius), and novelists (Franz Werfel)
Mahler, Gustav
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7 Jul. 1860
Kalischt, Bohemia
18 May 1911
Vienna, Austria
a Bohemian-Austrian composer and conductor. Mahler was best known during his own lifetime as one of the leading orchestral and operatic conductors of the day, but he has since come to be acknowledged as among the most important post-romantic composers
[Ivor Solomons writes: "Deryck Cooke made a performing version of the 10th Symphony from the sketches"]
Mahnkopf, Claus Steffen
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Mahon, John
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Mahr, Timothy
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1956
Reedsburg, Wisconsin, USA
 American composer
Maichelbeck, Franz Anton
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Maier, Michael
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Maier Rontgen, Amanda
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Maiguashca, Mesias
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Maikapar (or Majkapar), Samuel18 Dec. 1867
Kherson, Ukraine
8 May 1938
Leningrad, Russia
Ukrainian pianist and composer
Maillard, Jean
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c.1515
France
after 1570a French composer of the Renaissance. Maillard is mentioned by Rabelais in Gargantua and Pantagruel, and also by Ronsard in his Livre des Mélanges (1560 and 1572). He was evidently famous during his time, and many of his motets were used as source material for parody masses by composers as distinguished as Palestrina; in addition Lassus reworked some of his music. Claude Goudimel also used a secular chanson of Maillard's as source material for a mass
Maillart, Aime
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Mailly, Alphonse Jean Ernest27 Nov. 1833
Brussels, Belgium
10 Jan. 1918
Brussels, Belgium
brilliant Belgium organist who studied with Lemmens at the Brussels Conservatory and from 1861 was teacher of piano and organ there
[entry prompted by Terry L. Mueller]
Mailman, Martin
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1932
New York City, USA
18 Apr. 2000
Denton, Texas, USA
prolific American composer providing works of chamber music, film and television music, band, choral, and orchestral music, an opera, and a requiem
Mainardi, Enrico
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19 May. 1897
Milan, Italy
10 Apr. 1976
Munich, Germany
Italian cellist, teacher and composer who studied at the Milan Conservatory, then went to Berlin where he studied with Hugo Becker. He taught in Berlin, Salzburg, Lucerne and Rome
Mainerio, Giorgio
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Maintz, Philipp
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Maistre (la Baronne), Mme. 1875
France
her opera Les Roussalkas was successfully performed at Brussels in 1870
Maistre, Mattheus Le
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Majer, Joseph Friedrich Bernhardt Kaspar
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16891768author of an important theoretical publication about the guitar Neu eröffneter theoretischer und praktischer Music-Saal which contains the earliest known reference to a six-string guitar. Its tuning, according to Majer, was D-A-D-F#-A-D
Majo, Ernst
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Makarov, Fiodor
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Makarov, Nikolay Petrovich16 Feb. 1810
Chukhloma, Russia
17 Dec. 1890
Funtikovo, Russia
Russian guitarist, lexicographer and composer
Makarova, Nina Vladimirovna
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12 Aug (old Style 30 July) 1908
Yurino, Russia
15 Jan. 1976
Moscow, Russia
Russian composer who studied under Nikolai Miaskovsky and married Aram Khachaturian in 1933. His nickname for her was "Gayaneh"
Makeba, Miriam
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Maklakiewicz, Jan
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24 Nov. 1899, Chojnata, Poland7 Feb. 1954
Warsaw, Poland
composer, conductor, teacher, critic and publicist. Paul Dukas was one of his composition teachers. Many of his works make use of Polish folk themes
Maladi, R 'Arimah'
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Malamas, Sokratis
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Malando
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Malashkin, Leonid Dmitriyevich1842
Ryazan, Russia
11 Feb. 1902
Moscow, Russia
Russian teacher, composer and folklorist
Malats, Joaquin
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Malawski, Artur
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4 Jul. 1904
Przemysl, Poland
26 Dec. 1957
Kraków, Poland
Polish violinist, conductor and composer. He taught at the State Higher School of Music in Kraków for 12 years and among his pupils included Penderecki and Schaeffer
Malbecque, Guillaume
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Maldeghem, Robert-Julien
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9 Oct. 1810
Dentergem (Flandre Occidentale)
13 Nov. 1893
Ixelles, Belgium
Belgian composer, organist, choral director and musicologist
Maldere, Pierre van
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16 Oct. 1729
Brussels, Belgium
13 Nov. 1893
Ixelles
Belgian composer and violinist
Malderen, Edward Van
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Malec, Ivo
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Malecki, Maciej
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Maleingreau, Paul Eugène de
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23 Nov. 1887
Trélon-sur-Thiérache
9 Jan. 1956
Brussels, Belgium
major organ works: Suite, Op. 14 (1919), Symphonie de noël, Op. 19 (1920), Symphonie de la passion, Op. 20 (1920), Symphonie de l'agneau mystique, Op.24 (1926), Messe du pâques, Op.31 and Suite mariale, Op. 65 (1939)
[entry by Terry L. Mueller]
Malfeyt, Philippe
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Malibran, Maria
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Malibran, Maria Felicitas1808
Paris
1836
England
learned to read music before she read words and made her acting debut at the age of five. By this time she could already speak four languages and had begun to study solfège and piano. At the age of twenty, she had the opera world of Paris at her feet, clamoring for her audacious acting and supple voice. Wherever she appeared, Malibran performed her own songs, accompanying herself on the piano, harp or guitar. Her own compositions were often published wherever she performed
Malipiero, Gian Francesco
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18 Mar. 1882
Venice, Italy
1 Aug. 1973
Asolo
Italy
Italian composer, musicologist and music editor
Maliszewski (or Malishevsky), Witold (or Vitold) Josefovitch20 Jul. 1873
Podolia, Ukraine
18 Jul. 1939
Zalesie, nr. Warsaw, Poland
Ukrainian composer and teacher
Malko, Nikolay (Andreyevich)4 May 1883
Brailov, Romania
22/23 Jun. 1961
Roseville, Sydney, NSW, Australia
composer
Mallapert, Robin
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fl. 1538-1553 French musician of the Renaissance, probably a composer, who spent most of his life in Rome. He is best known as the teacher of Palestrina
Malling, Otto Valdemar
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1 Jun. 1848
Copenhagen, Denmark
5 Oct. 1915
Copenhagen, Denmark
a Danish composer, from 1900 the cathedral organist in Copenhagen and from 1889 professor, then from 1899 Director of the Royal Academy of Music, Copenhagen
Mallozzi, Lou
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Malmfors, Ake
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Malmstén, Georg19021981Finnish composer
Malotte, Albert Hay
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Malovec, Jozef
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Malvezzi, Alberigo
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c.15501615brother of Cristofano, also an organist and composer
Malvezzi, Cristofano
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bap. 28 Jun. 1547
Lucca, Italy
22 Jan. 1599
Florence, Italy
Italian organist and composer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the most famous composers in the city of Florence during a time of transition to the Baroque style
Malz, Heinrich
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Mammadov, Mammad  Azerbaijan mugam composer
Mamiya, Michio
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Man, Roderik de
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Manassen, Alex
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Manassian, Gevord
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Manca, Gabriele
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Manchicourt, Pierre de
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c.1510
Béthune
5 Oct. 1564
Madrid, Spain
Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. Little is known of his early life other than that he was a choirboy at Arras in 1525; later in life he had a succession of posts in Arras, Tours and Tournai, before going to Spain to be master of the Flemish chapel in the court of Philip II, where he stayed for the remainder of his life
Mancina, Mark
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9 Mar. 1957
Santa Monica, California, USA
 a composer, primarily for Hollywood soundtracks
Mancinelli, Luigi
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Mancini, Francesco
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Mancini, Henry
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1924
Cleveland, USA
1994
USA
American composer who won 20 Grammy Awards and Academy Awards for the scores for Breakfast at Tiffany's and Victor/Victoria. He was a pioneer in moving film scores from heavy symphonic treatments to simpler arrangements employing jazz motifs
Mancuso, Francesca  composer who was published in Naples in 1615
Mandel, Johnny
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Mandelbaum, Joel
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Mandolini, Ricardo
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Mandyczewski, Eusebius
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Manelli, Francesco
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Manen, Willem van
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Manfredini, Francesco Onofrio
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Mangeant, Jacques
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Mangeant, (Jean) Sylvain or Silvain
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4 Aug. 1827
Lectoure, France
18 Aug. 1889French composer of vaudevilles, cantatas, etc.
Mangelsdorff, Albert
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Mangon, Johannes
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Mangon, Reichard
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Maniam, Stephen
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1 Sep. 1974
Irvine, Scotland
 Scottish composer of orchestral, chamber and vocal music
[information supplied by composer]
Manjon, Antonio Gimenez
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Mann, Arthur Henry
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Mann, Chris
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Mann, David
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Mann, Gottfried
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Mannee, Jan
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1962
Barneveld, The Netherlands
 Dutch organist and composer. His compositions include, for organ, Passacaglia and Fugue with quotations and on themes of D. Shostakovich; Valerius Suite on Dutch Folksongs, Suite de Noel): for chamber choir a number of Christmas Carols (with chamber orchestra), a Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis, two a cappella Masses (Missa Romana and Missa Firenze) and music for liturgical use
[information provided by the composer]
Manneke, Daan
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Manns, August
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1825
Gdansk, Poland
1907
London, UK
clarinetist, conductor and composer who began his musical career as a bandmaster in the Prussian army. In 1854, Manns moved to London where he played clarinet in the Crystal Palace military band. Manns and George Grove converted the band to an orchestra which Manns conducted for over 40 years, giving upwards of 12,000 concerts. He also conducted the massive Crystal Palace Handel Festivals, which continued until the building burnt down in 1936
Mano, Mme  composer who published in Paris between 1730-1740
Manojlovic, Kosta18901949Serbian composer particularly of choral music
Manoury, Philippe
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Mansell, Clint
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Mansurjan, Tigran [Mansurian]
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27 Jan. 1939
Beirut, Lebanon
 Lebanese-born composer who has lived in Armenia since 1947. Mansurian's early works are serial but increasingly Armenian elements come to dominate his music and modal harmony is a feature in his works
Mantler, Michael
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Mantovani, Bruno
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Mantovano, Alessandro
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Mantua, Jacquet de (see Colebault, Jacques)   
Mäntyjärvi, Jaakko
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27 May 1963
Turku, Finland
 choral composer; he has been composer-in-residence with the Tapiola Chamber Choir since 2000. He draws on a wide range of influences, describing himself as an "eclectic traditionalist". He writes both secular and sacred music in a free-tonal style. His most popular works are Pseudo-Yoik (1994), a gloss on the traditional Sámi yoik, and El Hambo (1997), a folk dance spoof. His principal work to date is the choral drama Salvat 1701 (2000) for reciters, soloists and choir, which could be described as something between a narrated concert and a church drama
Mäntynen, Harri1963 trombonist and composer who studied at the Jyväskylä Conservatory and now plays in the Turku City Orchestra
Manz, Paul (grandparents name was Manishevsky)
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10 May 1919
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
 American organist (Minneapolis Mt. Olive Lutheran Church) and composer. Works for organ include: Aria, Variations 'O God, our help in ages past', Still, Still, Still, Partita on 'From heaven above to earth I come' Op.18, and Partita 'St. Anne'
[entry by Terry L. Mueller]
Manzanero, Armando
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7 Dec. 1935
Mérida, México
 Latin American musician and composer, widely considered the premiere Mexican romantic composer of the postwar era
Manzi, Homero (born Homero Nicolás Manzioni Prestera)
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1 Nov. 1907
Añatuya, Santiago del Estero, Argentina
3 May 1951
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentine Tango lyricist, author of various famous tangos
Mara Ignaz
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c.1721
Deutschbrod, Bohemia
1783
Berlin, Germany
in 1742 he went to Berlin, married, and was received , apparently through the recommendation of his countryman, the Concertmaster, Franz Benda, into the Royal band, to which he belonged for more than thirty years. Of his Cello compositions, consisting of Concertos, several solo pieces and Duets, nothing has been printed
Mara, Gertrud Elisabeth (Schmeling)1749
Kassel, Germany
Jan. 1833
Revel, Livonia
soprano and composer also known also as La Mara. The daughter of a poor musician called Schmeling, she spent her earliest years tied to a chair whenever her father went to work and became permanently disabled, though she managed to become a violin virtuoso at 6 (and was forced to switch to singing at the age of 11 when her English patrons, including the Queen, informed her that the violin was not feminine enough). In 1773 she married Johann Baptiste Mara, son of Ignaz Mara. She was considered one of the finest sopranos of her day, noted particuarly for her rivalry with Luísa Rosa de Aguiar Todi> (1753-1833) a very popular Portuguese opera singer
[picture of Gertrud Mara]
Mara, Johann Baptiste20 Jul 17441808
Schiedam, The Netherlands
Ignaz's son, Johann, was more widely known. This was not due to his artistic endowments only, but to the dissipated wild life into which he fell from middle age in consequence of intemperate habits. Endowed with extraordinary musical talent, under the guidance of his father, he developed, during a proportionately short time, into such an excellent Cellist that Prince Henry of Prussia named him Chamber Musician. As he possessed a talent for mimicry, he had also to assist on the stage at the theatrical representations which took place in the Castle of Rheinsberg, inhabited by the Prince. In 1773 he married the celebrated singer, Elizabeth Schmeling, who, at that time, belonged to the Berlin Opera. He made use of the large sums paid to his wife to gratify his passions, which led to many disasters and to matrimonial disturbances. The Violoncello compositions of Mara, which consist of two Concertos, twelve Solos with Bass accompaniment, a Duet with Violin, and a Sonata with Bass, remained unpublished
Maraire, Dumisani
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Marais, Marin
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31 May 1656
Paris, France
15 Aug. 1728
Paris, France
a pupil of Jean-Baptiste Lully and of the viol player Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe. He was hired as a musician in 1676 to the royal court of Versailles. He did quite well as court musician, and in 1679 was appointed ordinaire de la chambre du roy pour la viole, a title he kept until 1725. He was a master of the viola da gamba, and the leading French composer of viol music
Marais, Paul (Emile) Des23 Jun. 1920
Menominee, Mich., USA
 American composer
Marais, Roland
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Marazzoli, Marco
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Marbe, Myriam
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Marcabru
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fl.1130-1150 an exception among troubadours. He is described as having been deposited on the door of a rich family, and this cuckoo's egg history is perhaps an apt metaphor for his place among the troubadours. He also had a reputation for being a difficult person
Marcailhou, Gatien
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Marceau, V
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Marcellino, Raffaele
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Marcello, Alessandro (often used the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico)
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24 Aug. 1669
Venice, Italy
19 Jun. 1747
Padua, Italy
Italian nobleman and dilettante who dabbled in various areas, including poetry, philosophy, mathematics and, perhaps most notably, music
Marcello, Benedetto
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31 Jul/1 Aug. 1686
Venice, Italy
24 Jul. 1739
Brescia, Italy
Italian composer, writer, advocate, magistrate, and teacher
Marcello, Rosanna Scalfifl. 1723-42 composer
Marchal, André
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6 Feb. 1894
Paris, France
27 Aug. 1980
Saint-Jean-de-Luz
a French organist, organ teacher and an unparalled improviser. He was one of the great initiators of organ revival in France
Marchand, Louis
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2 Feb. 1669
Lyon, France
17 Feb. 1732
Paris, France
virtuoso organist, harpsichordist and composer. At the age of thirty-one, he became Organist to the King. He was known for his flamboyant nature both personally and musically, and took Paris by storm when he arrived there from Lyon. By nature he was said to be a difficult and unreliable person, but he was nevertheless known by many as Marchand le Grand. One surviving anecdote about him states that, while on tour in Dresden, he agreed to a musical competition with Johann Sebastian Bach, but left the city shortly before the competition was set to begin. Many said that he had fled out of fear of being shown up by Bach, but no conclusive proof of this exists. A more reliable account of Marchand does indeed survive, and indicates the boldness of his manner. After Marchand's wife had left him, the king ordered him to pay half of his salary to her. As a result of that, an enraged Marchand broke off in the middle of one of his concerts and, before the entire assembled court, told the king that if his wife was receiving half of his salary she should come and play the rest of the concert. Despite Marchand's success and popularity in his day, only a few airs and cantatas, plus two harpsichord suites (1702) were published. A third book of harpsichord pieces, made of 14 entries (12 in c minor, 2 in C major) and attributed to Louis Marchand for its largest part, has been discovered in France in 2003
[entry provided by Victor Krasovsky]
Marchetti, Walter
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Marchitelli, Pietro
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Marclay, Christian
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Marco, Paolo di
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Marco, Tomas
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Marcucci, Carlos
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Marder, Marc
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Marecos, Carlos
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Marek, Czeslaw
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Marenzio, Luca
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c.18 Oct. 1553
Coccaglio, Brescia
22 Aug. 1599
Rome, Italy
an Italian composer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the most renowned composers of madrigals, and wrote perhaps the finest examples of the form in its late stage of development, prior to its early Baroque transformation by Monteverdi
Mareschall, Samuel
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Mareuil, Arnaut de
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Marez-Oyens, Tera de
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Margaret of Austria (Marguerite d'Autriche)14801530patroness and composer of love songs
Margaret of Scotland 1093
Scotland
famous for the ballads she composed and sang for her ladies-in-waiting. The themes dealt with the equality of love between men and women
Margola, Franco
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Marguerite de Turenne (see Maria de Ventadorn)   
Maria Antonia, Duchess (Electress of Saxony)1724
Germany
1782
Germany
daughter of Emperor Charles VII, a poet, painter, singer and composer. Two of her operas were published
Maria Charlotte Amalia, Duchess of Saxe-Gotha1751
Germany
 published songs and wrote a symphony
Maria de Ventadorn
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fl. late 12th centuryc.1222Her name is variously recorded as Marie de Turenne and Marguerite de Turenne. A patron of troubadour poetry at the end of the 12th century, Maria de Ventadorn is listed as a trobairitz in her own right on the strength of a single tensó or poetic debate (dated c.1197), of which alternate verses were apparently composed by her and by Gui d'Ussel. The question at issue in the debate was this: once a man has succeeded in his plea to be accepted as a lady's lover, does he thereafter become her equal, or does he remain her servant? Maria takes the latter view
Maria Paulowna, Grand Duchess of Weimar1786
Germany
1859daughter of Emperor Paul I of Russia, she had a remarkable ability to read orchestral scores at first sight. She composed for piano
Mariano, Cesar Camargo
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19 Sep. 1943
São Paulo, Brazil
 Brazilian pianist, arranger, composer and music producer
Mariano, Charlie
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Maric, Ljubica
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Marie Adelaide of Savoy (Mme la Dauphine)1685
France
1712
France
composer
Marie de France
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c. 1160
France
1215
France
although scholars do not know the identity of the woman we call today Marie de France, the name being derived from a line in one of her published works: Marie ai nun, si sui de France, which translates as: "My name is Marie, I am from France," several historical women have been suggested as candidates. Among those that have been taken most seriously are Marie, Abbess of Shaftesbury and half-sister to Henry II, King of England; Marie, Abbess of Reading; Marie de Boulogne; and most compelling of all, Marie de Meulan, wife of Hugh Talbot. Twelve of her songs, or lais, are in the British Museum
Marie de Turenne (see Maria de Ventadorn)   
Marietan, Pierre
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Marin, Jose
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Marini, Biagio
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Marini, Carlo Antonio
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Marini, Giovanna
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Marino, Carlo Antonio
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Marinoni, Girolamo
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Marinov, Albert
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1937
Luxembourg
 engineer, company executive and composer from Luxembourg
Mario, E A
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Markevich (or Markevitch), Igor27 Jul. 1912
Kiev, Ukraine
7 Mar. 1983
Antibes, France
Ukrainian composer, conductor and pianist
Marks, Benjamin
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Marks, Frank
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Marks, Johnny
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Marlow, Richard
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Marly, Anna (see Betoulinsky, Anna)   
Marmontel, Antonin Emil Louis Corbaz
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24 Apr. 1850
Paris, France
23 Jul. 1907
France
a piano teacher at the Conservatoire and composer of many salon pieces. His father Antoine François Marmontel (1816-1898) was a French pianist, teacher and musicographer
Maros, Miklos
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Marpurg, Friedrich Wilhelm
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Marques y Garcia, Pedro Miguel
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Marquez, Arturo
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Marquina, Pascual
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Marsalis, Branford
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Marsalis, Ellis
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Marsalis, Wynton
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Marschner, Heinrich August
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Marseille, Folquet de
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Marsh, John
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Marsh, Warne
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Marshall, Christopher
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Marshall, Ingram
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Marshall, Jack
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23 Nov. 1921
El Dorado, Kansas, USA
20 Sep. 1973
Newport Beach, California, USA
television and film music composer
Marshall, Mrs. Julian1843
Rome, Italy
 student at the Royal Academy in London, conductor of South Hampstead orchestra, biographer of Handel and composer
Marshall, Mike
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Marshall, Nicholas
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Marshall, Wayne
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Marszalek, Franz
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Marta, Istvan
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Martim (see Martin)   
Martin (or Martin)fl. 13th century
Spain
 Galician trovador whose Codax left us the earliest example of Spanish secular music, a song cycle written in the voice of a woman, called the Cantigas de Amigo
Martin, Anne
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Martin Codax
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fl. 13th/14th century a medieval Galician troubadour, possibly from Vigo, Spain about whom little is known. The body of literary work attributed to him is limited to seven cantigas de amigo that appear in the lyrics of Portuguese-Galician songbooks and in the Vindel parchment, in which he is listed as the author of the compositions. The discovery of this parchment was by sheer chance: Pedro Vindel found them in his library at the beginning of the 20th century, lining a copy of Cicero's De Officiis
Martin, Francois II
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Martin, Frank
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15 Sep. 1890
Geneva, Switzerland
21 Nov. 1974
The Netherlands
Swiss composer, who lived a large part of his life in the Netherlands
Martin, Frederick John Easthope
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1882
Stourport
1925studied piano, organ, harmony and composition (with Coleridge-Taylor) at Trinity College London. His Evensong, variously arranged for piano, organ and orchestra, became very popular, but apart from An Old Time Tune> which also appeared in various versions, the posthumously published Souvenirs> for piano and a few other piano solos, the bolero Castanets, for violin and piano, and Two Eastern Dances> for orchestra premiered by Sir Henry Wood at the Proms, his output was primarily for the voice
Martin, George II
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Martin, Hugh
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Martin, Jennifer
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Martin, Jorge
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Martin, Laurent
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Martin, Lydia
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Martin, Philip
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Martin, Ray11 Oct. 1918
Vienna, Austria
7 Feb. 1988
Johannesburg, South Africa
conductor, producer, Artists and Repertoire Manager at EMI’s Columbia label, and composer of light music. Martin studied at the Vienna Academy of Music and Dramatic Art from 1933 to 1938, then came to Britain in 1938, touring with the famous Jack Hylton band in Band Wagon, and Carroll Levis as a solo violin act in his Discoveries. He wrote arrangements for Mantovani, Geraldo, Stanley Black, Peter Yorke and Billy Ternent, among others. He used his composing skills by contributing several pieces of mood music for Charles Brull’s Harmonic Music Library. In 1947 he was given his first BBC Radio series Reprise, and his many subsequent broadcasts included Fanfare, Waltz Time, Top Town, Morning Music, In the Still of the Night, Mr. Music and Music in the Ray Martin Manner
Martin, Richard
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Martin y Coll, Antonio
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Martin y Soler, Vicente
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Martinaitis, Algirdas
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Martinengo, Giulio Cesare
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1564 or c.1568
probably Verona, Italy
10 Jul. 1613
Venice, Italy
an Italian composer and teacher of the late Renaissance and early Baroque Venetian School. He was the predecessor to Claudio Monteverdi at St. Mark's
Martinez (Martines) (von), Marianne1744
Vienna, Austria
1812prolific composer, made a member of the Music Academy of Bologna 1773. Joseph Haydn received free room and board in exchange for teaching the highly gifted ten-year-old Martinez. He considered her an adopted daughter. Her portrait may still be seen in his home in Vienna. She was also one of the favourite piano four-hands and duet partners of W. Mozart
Martinez, Federico
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Martinez Burgos, Manuel
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Martinez Izquierdo, Ernest
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Martinez Leal, Ricardo
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Martinez Valls, Rafael
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Martini, Christiane
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Martini, Giovanni Battista
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24 Apr 1706
Bologna, Italy
4 Aug 1784
Bologna, Italy
Italian violinist, composer and priest. Padre Martini was a zealous collector of musical literature, and possessed an extensive musical library. Burney estimated it at 17,000 volumes; after Martini's death a portion of it passed to the Imperial library at Vienna, the rest remaining in Bologna, now in the Liceo Rossini
Martini, Johannes
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c.1440
Brabant
late 1497/early 1498
Ferrara, Italy
a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He is the first composer known to have set psalms for double choir singing antiphonally. This style, which was to become famous in Venice under the direction of Adrian Willaert seventy years later, seems to have had no influence at the time: yet it was a striking innovation
Martini, Johann Paul Aegidius
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Martino, Donald James
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Martino, Philippo
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Martinon, Jean
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Martinov, Vladimir
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Martinu, Bohuslav
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Martirano, Salvatore
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Martirosyan, Armen
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1963
Yerevan, Armenia
 Armenian composer who studied at the Yerevan music school and between 1980 and 1985 at the Department of Composition of the Yerevan State Conservatory. Between 1991 and 1995 he lived and worked in Switzerland, as a pianist, composer and arranger. After that he worked at the Yerevan State Song Theatre, as a producer-musician and an arranger
Martland, Steve
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10 Oct. 10 1959
Liverpool, UK
6 May 2013
London, UK
iconoclastic English composer
Marttinen, Tauno
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27 Sep. 1912
Helsinki, Finland
18 Jul. 2008
Janakkala, Finland
Finnish composer and conductor. His early works were particularly harshly received by critics. In 1956, he disowned his entire output up to that date, some 40 works, and declared Kokko, ilman lintu (Eagle, Bird of the Air, 1956) for mezzosoprano and orchestra to be his opus 1. The work opened a new, more modern phase in his output and an extensive series of works based on the Kalevala
Martucci, Giuseppe
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6 Jan. 1856
Capua, Italy
1 Jun. 1909
Naples, Italy
an Italian composer, conductor, pianist and teacher. He was a child prodigy, performing on the piano at the age of 10. He was a student at the Naples conervatory, where he subsequently held a professorship, becoming director in 1902
Martusciello, Maurizio
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Marty, Adolphe
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29 Sep. 1865, France1942
Paris, France
organist of Paris St-François-St-Xavier. His organ works include: Noël breton, Offertoire pour la fête de l'immaculée conception, Offertoire pour la pentecôte and Pastorale in D major (1892)
[entry by Terry L. Mueller]
Marty, Georges-Eugène (Eugène Georges)
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16 May 1860
Paris, France
11 Oct. 1908
Paris, France
French composer of orchestral works, operas, choruses, etc.; transcriptions of early music (Couperin, Rameau: Platée ballet excerpts)
Maruelh, Arnaut de
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Marvia, Einari
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21 Nov. 1915
Tuusniemi, Finland
16 Jun. 1997
Helsinki, Finland
composer of over 100 solo songs, he was influenced by his teacher Melartin but also incorporated elements of Impressionism and Expressionism into his colourful songs
Marx, Joseph
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Marx, Karl
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Marxsen, Eduard
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23 Jul. 1806
Nienstädten bei Altona, Germany
18 Nov. 1887
Altona, Germany
a former pupil of Ignaz Seyfried, who was highly regarded in Hamburg both as pianist and composer. He was one of the composition teachers of Johannes Brahms
Marylis, Guy (see Bonnal, Joseph-Ermend)   
Mary Queen of Scots (Mary Stuart)15421587
England
composer of many songs, at least two of which met with success
Mascagni, Pietro
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7 Dec. 1863
Livorno, Italy
2 Aug. 1945
Rome, Italy
one of the most important Italian opera composers of the turn of the twentieth century
the Italian composer Pietro Mascagni was sitting in his study one day when a street musician stopped outside and began to play one of Mascagni’s pieces on his hand-cranked barrel organ. He was turning the handle too quickly so that the tempo was faster than it should have been. Mascagni put up with it for a few minutes, then he went outside, grabbed the handle, and played the piece at its proper tempo. He then returned to his study. Next day he was amused to see the street musician displaying a sign which read, ‘Pupil of the celebrated Mascagni’!
Mascheroni, Angelo
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Mascitti, Michele
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Masefield, Jamie
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Masek, Vaclav Vincenc
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Masekela, Hugh
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Mashayekhi, Nader
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1958
Tehran, Iran
 Persian avant-garde composer. From 2006 until July 2007, he was conductor of Tehran Symphony Orchestra
Masini, Lorenzo (di Masi) (see Firenze, Lorenzo da)   
Maskats, Arturs
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20 Dec. 1957
Valmiera, Latvia
 Latvian composer
Maslanka, David
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30 Aug. 1943
New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA
 American composer who writes for a variety of genres, including works for choir, concert band, chamber music, and orchestra
Mason, Daniel Gregory
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20 Nov. 1873
Brookline, Massachusseys, USA
4 Dec. 1953
Greenwich, Conn., USA
American professor of music at Columbia University, and composer of symphonies and piano works, grandson of Lowell Mason
Mason, George
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Mason, Lowell
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8 Jan. 1792
Medfield, Mass., USA
11 Aug. 1872
New Jersey, NY, USA
composer (credited with over 1600 religious works), conductor (Handel and Haydn Society), instructor (Boston Academy of Music) and music publisher (Cantica Laudis: The American Book of Church Music, 1850, and others). Well known as a hymn composer, arranger and harmonizer, his tunes include Joy to the World! (Antioch), Nearer, My God, to Thee (Bethany), My Faith Looks Up to Thee (Olivet), and many more
Mason, William
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18291908concert pianist, teacher, author and composer, son of Lowell Mason
Masondo, Juan
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Massaino, Tiburtio
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Massarenghi, Paola1565 she flourished sometime about 1585 and was only the second woman to publish a musical composition during her lifetime
Massart, Louise Aglae Masson1827
Paris, France
1887composer and professor of piano, Paris Conservatoire
Masse, Jean Baptiste
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Masse, Victor
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Massenet, Jules
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12 May 1842
Montaud, France
13 Aug. 1912
France
French composer. He is best known for his operas, which were very popular in the late 19th and early 20th century; they afterwards fell into oblivion for the most part, but have undergone periodic revivals since the 1980s
Masset, (Nicolas) Jean Jacques
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1811
Liège, Belgium
c.1887
probably Paris, France
violinist and composer of methods for voice, works for violin, and solo flute works for Dorus
Massey, Roy
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Masson, Askell
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Masson, Elizabeth1806
London
1865singer, composer and voice teacher, founder of the Royal Society of Female Musicians in 1839
Massonneau, Louis
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Masuch, Daniel
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Masuka, Dorothy
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Matalon, Martin
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1958
Buenos Aires, Argentina
 studied composition at the Juilliard School in New York. At Ircam between 1993 and 1995, he worked on the music for the film Metropolis by Fritz Lang, and interactive music to accompany Maurice Benayoun’s images in Le Tunnel sous l'Atlantique. In 1996, the Centro de Cultura Contemporanea de Barcelona commissioned him to write music for the Luis Buñuel film Un Chien Andalou and in 1997 with Rugged Lines, music for a dance production of Six Memos for the Next Millenium by Italo Calvino
Matejka, Vaclav
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Matelart, Johannes
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Mateo, H.
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Mathews, Max V.
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Mathews, Peter
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Mathieu, Rodolphe
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Mathias, William
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1 Nov. 1934
Whitland, Wales
29 Jul. 1992
Anglesey, Wales
Welsh composer and academic, Mathias was a prolific writer of works for the Anglican choral tradition, most famously the anthem Let the people praise Thee, O God written for the July 1981 royal wedding of the Prince and Princess of Wales. He wrote much for the organ too: Antiphonies, Berceuse, Fantasy, Fenestra, Invocations Op.35 (1967), Partita Op.19 (1963), Variations on a hymn tune 'Braint' Op.20 (1963), Postlude (1963), Processional (1965), Chorale (1967), Toccata giocosa Op.36/2 (1968), Jubilate Op.67/2 (1975), Fantasy Op.78 (1978), Canzonetta Op.78/2 (1979), Concerto for Organ & Orchestra
[organ related information by Terry L Mueller]
Maticic, Janez
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Matielli, Giovanni Antonio
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Matinier, Jean Louis
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Matos Rodriguez, Gerardo
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Matsudaira, Yori-Aki
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Matsudaira, Yoritsune
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Matsumoto, Hinoharu
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Matsushita, Isao
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Mattei, Beatricefl. 1743
Italy
 composer
Matteis, Nicola
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  a brilliant Neapolitain violinist who came to London around 1670. During his early years there he performed very little, allegedly because he was 'inexpugnably proud,' but he was later described as 'stupendious' by Evelyn, and considered a second Corelli by North and Burney.
Matter, Bert
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Mattheson, Johann
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Matthews, Artie
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Matthews, Colin
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13 Feb. 1946
London, UK
 English composer of classical music, younger brother of English composer David Matthews
Matthews, David
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4 Mar. 1942 keyboardist, pianist, and arranger born in Sonora, Kentucky
Matthews, David
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9 Mar. 1943
London, UK.
 English composer of mainly orchestral, chamber, vocal and piano works, older brother of English composer Colin Matthews
Matthews (Wrighten after marriage), Mary Annc. 17511796soprano and composer of songs
Matthus, Siegfried
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Matthys, Marc
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Matton, Roger
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Mattsson, Jack
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12 Dec. 1954
Åland, Finland
 flautist and composer, Mattsson explains that he has remained "separate from everything that the avantgarde and the experimental crowd have to offer". He considers his Piano Trio In Memoriam (to the memory of Einar Englund) his principal work
Matuschka-Greiffenclau, count
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Matuszczak, Bernadetta
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10 Mar. 1937
Torun, POland
 she studied composition with Tadeusz Szeligowski and Kazimierz Sikorski after which she studied under Nadia Boulanger in Paris. Matuszczak's compositions have received numerous performances in Poland and abroad; e.g. her Septem Tubae was played at the 43rd Weltmusikfest in Hamburg in 1969, and her chamber opera Juliet and Romeo at the Internationale Maifestspiele in Wiesbaden in 1972
Matz, Rudolf
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Mauduit, Jacques
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16 Sep. 1557
Paris, France
21 Aug. 1627
Paris, France
a French composer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the most innovative French composers of the late 16th century, combining voices and instruments in new ways, and importing some of the grand polychoral style of the Venetian School from Italy; he also composed a famous Requiem for the funeral of Pierre de Ronsard
Mauersberger, Rudolf
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Mauleon, Rebeca
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Maurat, Edmond
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Maurer, Albrecht
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Maurice, Paule
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1910
Paris, France
1967
Paris, France
a French composer
Maute, Matthias
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1963
Germany
 recorder player and composer
Maw, (John) Nicholas
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5 Nov. 1935
Grantham, England
19 May 2009
Washington, DC, USA
British composer. His music has been described as neo-romantic but also as modernist and non-tonal
Mawhinney, Simon
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1976
Co. Armagh, Ireland
 pianist and composer, whose compositions cover the entire range of contemporary music – from electronic music to pieces for symphony orchestra – and are characterised by a characteristic blend of sensuousness and severity, which is frequently combined with dazzling virtuosity
Maxson, Frederick18621934organist of the First Baptist Church and the Central Congregational Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he played the inauguration concert of the Grace Church organ in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on February 11, 1909. Some of his compositions for organ have been published
Maxwell Davies, Peter
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8 Sep 1934
Manchester, UK
 he took piano lessons and composed from an early age. After education at Leigh Grammar School, he studied at the University of Manchester and at the Royal Manchester College of Music (amalgamated into the Royal Northern College of Music in 1973), where his fellow students included Harrison Birtwistle, Alexander Goehr, Elgar Howarth and John Ogdon. Together they formed New Music Manchester, a group committed to contemporary music. After graduating in 1956, he briefly studied with Goffredo Petrassi in Rome before working as Director of Music at Cirencester Grammar School from 1959 to 1962. After a further period of study on a Harkness Fellowship at Princeton University with Roger Sessions, Milton Babbitt and Earl Kim, Davies moved to Australia, where he was Composer in Residence at the Elder Conservatorium of Music, University of Adelaide from 1965-66. He then returned to the United Kingdom, and moved to the Orkney Islands, initially to Hoy in 1971 and later to Sanday. Orkney (particularly its capital, Kirkwall) hosts the St Magnus Festival, an arts festival founded by Davies in 1977. He frequently uses it to premier new works (often played by the local school orchestra). Davies was Artistic Director of the Dartington Summer School from 1979 to 1984 and has held a number of posts and been awarded a number of honorary doctorates at various institutions since then. He has been President of Making Music (The National Federation of Music Societies) since 1989. From 1992 to 2002 he was associate conductor/composer with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra and he has conducted a number of other prominent orchestras, including the Philharmonia, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. Davies was made a CBE in 1981 and knighted in 1987. He was appointed Master of the Queen's Music for a ten-year period from March 2004
[date of birth corrected by by Terry L. Mueller]
Maxwell Geddes, John
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May, Frederick
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1911
Dublin, Ireland
1985unlike many of his contemporaries, May’s music is distinctly European in flavour. Although his output was small, his works include the Scherzo for Orchestra (1933), Songs from Prison (1941) for baritone and orchestra and, perhaps his finest work, the String Quartet in C Minor which he wrote on his return to Dublin in 1936. He held the post of Music Director at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, for fifteen years and wrote incidental music for several plays
May, Hans
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May, Simon
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1944
Devizes, Wilts.
 educated at Cambridge University and for some years a teacher of music and languages at Kingston Grammar School, one of May's earlier works was a musical, Smike, after Dickens' Nicholas Nickleby, which used jazz, even pop, idioms. He is credited with a large amount of TV music including the titles for Eastenders, Trainer and Howard's Way
May, Theodore
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May, Will
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Mayboroda, Hryhoriy
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1913
Ukraine
 a student of Revutsky, Mayboroda graduated from the Kyiv Conservatory in 1941. He was appointed to the faculty in 1952 and has written operas, orchestral works, and numerous vocal pieces. Mayboroda’s style follows the heroic themes of the Soviet school of social realism. His opera, Taras Shevchenko, dates from 1964
Mayer, Charles
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Mayer, Emilie1812
Germany
1883her compositions include over 150 songs and dances, 14 string quartets, 11 piano trios, 12 violin sonatas, 12 overtures, 7 symphonies and an operetta. Winner of the Gold Medal of Art
Mayerl, Billy Joseph
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31 May 1902
London, UK
25 Mar 1959a pianist and composer who built a career in music hall and music theatre and became an acknowledged master of light music. He wrote over 300 piano pieces, many of which were named after flowers, including his best known composition, Marigold (1927)
Mayone, Ascanio
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15651627 Italian composer who was a pupil of Macque in Naples, and worked at SS. Annunziata, as organist from 1593 and maestro di cappella from 1621. He was also organist at the royal chapel from 1602
Mayr, Johann Simon
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14 Jun 1763
Mendorf, Bavaria
2 Dec. 1845
Bergamo, Italy
also known as Giovanni Simone Mayr or Simone Mayr, also spelled Majer, Mayer, Maier, a German composer whose works, which include almost 70 operas, are infrequently performed today
Mayr, Rupert Ignaz
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Mays, Lyle
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Mayuzumi, Toshiro
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Mazijk, Rutger van
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Mazulis, Rytis
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Mazur, Marilyn
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Mazurek, Rob
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MazzaCane Connors, Loren
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Mazzaferrata, Giovanni Battista
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Mazzocchi, Domenico
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Mazzocchi, Virgilio
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Mazzuoli, Giovanni (see Florentia, Jovannes de)   
McAleer, Peter
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McBeth, W. Francis
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Mar. 1933
Lubbock, Texas, USA
 American composer
McCabe, John
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McCall, J.P. (pseudonym of Peter Dawson)
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31 Jan 1882
Australia
27 Sep 1961Peter Dawson was a famous Australian bass/baritone singer, but under the pseudonym J.P. McCall he wrote many songs including the ballad Boots (with lyrics by Rudyard Kipling), said to have been inspired by the rhythm of a railway train
McCann, Les
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23 Sep. 1935
Lexington, Kentucky, USA
 soul jazz piano player and vocalist whose biggest successes came as a crossover artist into R&B and soul
McCarthy, Eugene Patrick John
more...
20 Nov. 1919
London, England
8 Apr. 2009
London, England
choral conductor, scholar, composer and arranger
McCartney, James Paul
more...
18 Jun, 1942
Liverpool, England
 a multiple Grammy Award-winning English singer-songwriter, poet, composer, multi-instrumentalist, entrepreneur, record producer, film producer, painter, and animal rights activist. He gained worldwide fame as a member of The Beatles, alongside John Lennon, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr
McClure, Ron
more...
22 Nov. 1941
New Haven, Connecticut, USA
 a bassist, has played in hard bop, jazz-rock, and free and bebop sessions and bands
McCullough, Donald
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16 Aug. 1957 American choral director and composer with degrees in both organ and vocal performance from Stetson University and master’s degrees in both sacred music and vocal performance from Southern Methodist University
McDougall, Ian
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14 Jun. 1938
Calgary, Canada
 Canadian trombonist and composer
McDowall, Cecilia
more...
1951
London, England
 composer specialising in choral and chamber music
McDowell, Mississipi Fred
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12 Jan. 1904
Rossville, Tennessee, USA
3 Jul. 1972
Mississipi, USA
blues musician and songwriter
McEwen, John
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McGibbon, William
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McGinty, Anne
more...
1945
Findlay, Ohio, USA
 composer, flute instructor, guest conductor, and clinician, she also co-owns Queenwood Publications with her husband, John Edmondson
McGlynn, Michael
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McGriff, Jimmy
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McGuire, Edward
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McGuire, John
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McHugh, Jimmy
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McIntosh, Tom
more...
   
McKay, George Frederick
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McKenna, Dave
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McKennitt, Loreena
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McKevitt, Donna
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McKie, William
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McKinley, Elliott
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McKinley, William Thomas
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McKinnon, Dugal
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McLachlan, Grant
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1956
South Africa
 South African-born composer and musical director who studied and worked for many years in England but since 1994 has returned to Cape Town, South Africa
McLaughlin, John
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4 Jan. 1942
Doncaster, England
 English jazz fusion guitarist and composer
McLean, Barton
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McLean, Jackie
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McLennan, Gordon Stewart
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9 Feb. 1884
Scotland
1 Jun 1929
Aberdeen, Scotland
Scottish piper and composer
McLennan jnr., John Stewart
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191510 Oct 1996
Tyringham, MA, USA
American composer and creator of a notable garden at Ashintully, The Berkshires, USA
McLeod, John
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1934
Aberdeen, Scotland
 Scottish composer and conductor
McLoskey, Lansing
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21 May 1964
Mountain View, California, USA
 American composer
McMichael, Catherine
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1954 American pianist, composer, performer, arranger, and teacher.
McNabb, Michael
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McNeely, Jim
more...
   
McNeely, Joel
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McNemar, Richard
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McPartland, Marian (nee Page)
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20 Mar. 1918
Windsor, England
20 Aug. 2013
Long Island, New York, USA
born Margaret Turner, Marian was a major contributor to the Jazz world as a performer, composer, and writer, and with her popular program 'Piano Jazz', which was a feature of National Public Radio for over fifteen years. She married the trumpeter Jimmy McPartland during World War II and immigrated to the United States in 1946. In New York City she had long stays at the Embers Club and the Hickory House
McPhee, Colin
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McPhee, Joe
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McPherson, Gordon
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McQueen, Ian
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McTell, Ralph
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Mdivani, Andrey
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Meadowcroft, Thomas
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Meale, Richard
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Meaux, Etienne de
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Meda, Bianca Mariafl. 1691
Pavia
 composer
Medaglia, Julio
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Medek, Tilo
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Meder, Johann Gabriel
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Meder, Johann Valentin
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Medici x (de'), Isabella1542
Florence
1576
Florence
composer
Medici, Lorenzo de
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Medina, Pedro
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Medins, Janis
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Medtner (or Metner), Nikolai Karlovich
more...
5 Jan. 1880
Moscow, Russia
13 Nov. 1951
London, England
Russian composer and pianist
Meert, C.F. van
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fl. 18th century Belgian organist and composer active in Saint-Trond
Meester, Louis de
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Mefano, Paul
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Meglio, Vincenzo de
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Méhul, Étienne Nicolas
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24 Jun. 1763
Givet, France
18 Oct. 1817
Paris, France
French composer
Mehldau, Brad
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Meifred, Joseph ([Jean-Pierre] Émile)
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13 Nov. 1791
Colmar, France
28 Aug. 1867
Paris, France
French horn player, author of De l'Étendue, de l'emploi et des ressources du cor (Paris, 1829); Méthode pour le cor chromatique ou à pistons (Paris 1840, rev. edn. 1849; dedicated to Habeneck); poetry (catalogued by Bourquelot), and memoirs. He was also a critic for La Mélomanie and La Critique musicale
Meij, Johan de
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Meijering, Chiel
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Meisel, Will
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Meissen, Heinrich von (Henry of)
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  the name refers to two medieval German poets from Meissen - Heinrich Frauenlob (c.1250-1318), Middle High German poet and Henry III, Margrave of Meissen (1215-1288), noble and minnesinger
Meitus (or Meytus), Yuly (or Yuliy) Sergeyevich
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15 Jan. 1903
Korovograd, Ukraine
2 Apr. 1997
Korovograd, Ukraine
Ukrainian composer
Melachrino, George (born George Militiades)
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1 May 1909
London, UK
18 Jun. 1965
London, UK
musician, movie composer, and musical director who was English born of Greek and Italian descent. He was an accomplished player of the violin, viola, oboe, clarinet and saxophone
Melani, Alessandro
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16391703Itaslian composer who was member of a musical family in Pistoia who directed the music at San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome for 26 years
Melartin, Erkki
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7 Feb. 1875
Kakisalmi, Finland
14 Feb. 1937
Pukinmaki, Finland
he was the most versatile of all Finnish Late Romantics. Although the bulk of his extensive output falls within the conventional nationally tinted Romanticism of his age, he also approached more modern means of expression such as Impressionism and even Expressionism in the 1920s. Melartin's output centers on his six Symphonies. He was also the first in Finland after Pacius to write a substantial opera, and the first in Finland to write a full-length ballet. Another aspect of his persona as a composer may be found in his popular miniatures, many written in an accessible salon style. Melartin was also employed as Rector of the Helsinki Music Institute (the Helsinki Conservatory from 1924) from 1911 to 1936
Melchor, Enrique de
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Meldert, Léonhard van
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c.1535
Liège, Belgium
c.1594Flemish composer
Meldert Fiamengo, Leonardo
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Mele, Giovanni Battista
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Melgunov (or Melgunov, Melgounoff, Melgounov), Julius (or Yuly) Nikolayevich11 Sep. 1846
Vetluga, Russia
31 Mar. 1893
Moscow, Russia
Russian pianist and composer
Melikov, Arif
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13 Sep. 1933
Baku, Azerbailan
 Azerbaijanian traditional music is the basis of Melikov's compositions
Melillo, Stephen
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Melin, Sten
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Melis, Laszlo
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Melkich (or Melkikh), Dmitri Micheyevich31 Jan. 1885
Moscow, Russia
22 Feb. 1943
Moscow, Russia
Russian composer
Melkikh, Aleksandr1889 Russian composer
Mellers, Wilfrid Howard
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26 Apr. 1914
Leamington Spa, Warks, UK
16 May 2008
Scrayingham, N. Yorks, UK
English writer, teacher and composer
Melli (or Meli, Melij, Mely), Pietro Paolo
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15 Jul. 1579
Reggio nell'Emilia, Italy
after 1623Italian lutenist and composer, active in Austria
Melode, Kosmas de (see Cosmas de melode)   
Mena (de Texerana), Gabriel (Graviel, ‘el músico’)
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before 14963 Sep. 1528
Medina de Rioseco, Spain
Spanish singer and composer
Menasce, Jacques de
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19 Aug. 1905
Bad Ischl, Austria
28 Jan. 1960
Gstaad, Switzerland
composer and pianist
Menault, Pierre
more...
1642
Beaune, France
1694
Dijon, France
French composer
Mence, Selga
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1953
Liepaja, Latvia
 Latvian composer
Mendelssohn, Arnold Ludwig
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Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix
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3 Feb. 1809
Hamburg, Germany
4 Nov. 1847
Leipzig, Germany
a German composer and conductor of Jewish parentage of the early Romantic period. His work includes symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano, organ and chamber music. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes in the late 19th century, his creative originality is now being recognised and re-evaluated, and he is now amongst the most popular composers of the Romantic era. His major organ works include: 6 Sonatas, Op.65 (1844-5) and 3 Preludes and Fugues, Op.37 (1837)
[organ related information by Terry L. Mueller]
Mendelssohn-Hensel, Fanny
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14 Nov. 1805
Hamburg, Germany
14 May 1847
Berlin, Germany
a German pianist and composer who was the sister of Felix Mendelssohn
Mendes, Gilberto
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Mendes, Manuel
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c.1547
Lisbon, Portugal
24 Sep. 1605
Évora, Portugal
a Portuguese composer and teacher of the Renaissance. While his music remains obscure, he was important as the teacher of several of the composers of the golden age of Portuguese polyphony, including Duarte Lobo and Manuel Cardoso
Mendoza, Emilio
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Menescal, Roberto
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25 Oct. 1937
Vitória, Brazil
 Menescal studied piano, the accordion, harmonica and guitar, specializing finally in the latter. Menescal had harmony, arrangement and composition lessons with conductors Guerra-Peixe and Moacir Santos. Menescal settled in Rio de Janeiro, where he and Carlos Lyra founded a guitar academy. There, Menescal gave lessons, including to the bossa nova muse Nara Leão. In 1958 and 1959, he wrote his first songs and recorded tracks on the album Os Garotos da Bossa Nova. Menescal made friends with Ronaldo Bôscoli, with whom he wrote one of his greatest hits, bossa nova anthem O Barquinho, in 1961
Menetou (de), Mlle (Francoise Charlotte de Senneterre)1680 composer
Mengal, Martin Joseph
more...
  successful horn player, conductor and composer, trained at the Paris Conservatoire, who later became director of the Ghent Conservatory (1835). His brother Jean-Baptiste Mengal (1792-1878) was also a horn player
Mengelberg, Karel
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Mengelberg, Misha
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Mengelberg, Rudolf
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Menken, Alan
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Mennin, Peter
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1923
Erie, Pennsylvania, USA
 besides his six symphonies, American composer Mennin has composed concertos, string quartets, sonatas, and choral works
Menon, Tugdual (also in sources Tuttvalle, Tugdualo, Tudual, Tuttuale, Tuduuale, Jugdulus)
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before 1502
Britain
1566/68
Ferrara, Italy
French composer believed to be the teacher of the great organist Claudio Merulo
Menotti, Gian-Carlo
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Mensi, Franz
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27 Mar 1753
Bistra, Bohemia
after 1808
Pher
his father was tutor to Count Hohenems. The son early occupied himself with music, and when his parents went to Prague he became Joseph Reicha's pupil for Violoncello playing while Cajetan Vogel instructed him in theory. Mensi also played the Violin. On both instruments he was considered clever, and not less so in composition. Some of his works, which consist of church music, Symphonies, and Quartets, are said to be preserved in the convent at Strahow. In the year 1808, Mensi was still living and working as Roman Catholic priest at Pher
Meola, Al di
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Meragi, Hace Abdülkadir
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c. 1350
Meraga, Azerbaijan
1435
Herat, Turkey
Turkish/Azerbaijani composer who sung in the Timurid courts. He is considered the last of the greatest theorists of the pre-Ottoman Islamic tradition who dedicated his celebrated book Makasidu'l-Elhan to Ottoman Sultan Murad II. His son, Abdulaziz, was active as a composer, performer, and a writer on music during the reign of Mehmed II (1451-1481) while his grandson, Mahmud, was still active in the court of Suleyman I (1520-1566)
Mercadante, Saverio
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Mercer, Johnny
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Mercken, Sophie-Marguerite1776
Paris
1821daughter of Johann Kilian Mercken, considered to have been the first maker of pianos in Paris. Her set of Six Romances for voice and accompaniment is her only known publication
Mercker, Mathias
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Mercure, Pierre
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Mercy, Louis
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Mergner, Friedrich
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Meridan Skipp, Lisa
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Merikanto, Aarre
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29 Jun. 1893
Finland
29 Sep. 1958
Finland
student of Max Reger and son of Oskar, Aarre was the most earthy and florid of the Finnish Modernists, both as a composer and as a personality. He combined Finnish national elements such as folk dance rhythms with his Modernism, and even his principal work, the opera Juha, is set in a Finnish wilderness despite the universal applicability of its love-triangle story. Merikanto's core output includes orchestral works, concertos, chamber music, two orchestral songs and an opera
Merikanto, Oskar
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5 Aug. 1868
Helsinki, Finland
17 Feb. 1924
Oitti, Finland
Oskar Merikanto was born of Swedish parents, his father, originally Frank Mattsson, changing the family name to be more Finnish. Merikanto built bridges between concert music and the public at large. To this end, he undertook extensive concert tours in Finland as an organist, a concert pianist and an accompanist. His life's work covered an exceptionally broad span in Finnish music; in addition to everything else, he was a church organ inspector, a conductor, an educator and a music critic. Merikanto had a naturally flowing melodic vein, and he is best remembered for his solo songs and piano pieces, over 100 of each. It is indicative of just how popular he was and is that many of his songs are erroneously held to be folk songs. The first opera written in the Finnish language was written by Oskar Merikanto. Composed in a popular Romantic style, Pohjan neiti (The Bothnian Maid) was completed in 1899 and first produced in Helsinki in 1908
Merilainen, Usko
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27 Jan. 1930
Tampere, Finland
12 Nov. 2004
Tampere, Finland
like many composers of his generation, he was influenced by Stravinsky; hearing Sacre was a particularly formative experience for the young Meriläinen. The Stravinsky influences are at their most audible in Partita for Brass (1954) but can also be detected in the First Symphony (1955) and the First Piano Concerto (1955). Meriläinen's early Neo-Classical period culminated in the Concerto for Orchestra (1956), whose idiom is so chromatic as to lie on the threshold of dodecaphony. Meriläinen went through a brief row-technique period lasting only a few years. Despite its brevity, this period injected a new enthusiasm into his work. His dodecaphonic period began with the First Piano Sonata (1960) and ended with the First String Quartet (1965)
Merit, Jacky
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Merkel, Gustav Adolf
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Merkelys, Remigijus
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Merlet, Michel
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Merlin, Jose Luis
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Mernier, Benoit
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Merrill, William Pierson
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18671954pastor at Brick Church (Presbyterian) of New York City, author and composer of hymns, including Rise Up, O Men of God
Merritt, Thomas
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Mertel, Elias
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c.15611626lutenist and composer of the Renaissance
Mertens, Hardy
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Mertens, Karl Heinz
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Mertens, Wim
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Mertz, Johann Kaspar
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Mertzig, René
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1911
Luxembourg
1986
Luxembourg
pianist, violinist and composer from Luxembourg
Merula, Tarquinio
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Merulo, Claudio [Merlotti]
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8 Apr. 1533
Correggio, Italy
4 May 1604
Parma, Italy
Italian composer, publisher and organist of the late Renaissance, famous for his innovative keyboard music and his ensemble music in the Venetian polychoral style. His surname was Merlotti: he changed it in "Merulo" (Latin form of "Merlotti", meaning little blackbird) when he became famous in Venetian cultural clubs
Mes, Gherardus
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Mesa, Manuel de
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Mesangeau, Rene
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Mesomedes
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Messager, André Charles Prosper
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30 Dec. 1853
Montluçon. France
24 Feb. 1929
Paris, France
French musician. He studied at Paris, and was for some time a pupil of Saint-Saëns at the École Niedermeyer. In 1874 he became organist at St Sulpice. In 1876, he won the gold medal of the Société des Compositeurs with a symphony. In 1880 he was appointed music director at Ste Marie-des-Batignolles. In 1883 he completed Firmin Bernicat's comic opera François des bas bleus; and in 1885 produced his own operettas, La Fauvette du temple and La Béarnaise, the latter being performed in London in 1886. His ballet Les Deux pigeons was produced at the Paris Opera in 1886
Messaus (or Messaulx, Missau), Guillaume (Guilielmus) (van)
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bap. 2 Jul. 1589
Anvers, Belgium
8 Mar. 1640
Anvers, Belgium
Flemish composer
Messemaeckers, Henri jr
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Messiaen, Olivier
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10 Dec. 1908
Avignon, France
27 Apr. 1992
Paris, France
French organist, teacher and composer
[entry provided by L B Venema]
Mestdagh, Karel
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Mestres, Antonio
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Mestres Quadreny, Josep
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Metallo, D Grammatio
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Mettallov (or Mettallos), Vasily Mikhaylovich13 Mar. 1862
Saratov, Russia
1 Jun. 1926
Moscow, Russia
Russian musicologist and composer
Metcalf, John
more...
   
Metheny, Pat
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Metra, Olivier
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Meulemans, Arthur
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Meulemans, Herman
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Meulen, Jozef van der
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24 Mar. 1869
Ghent, Belgium
26 Sep. 1931
Ghent, Belgium
composer, conductor and teacher
Meulen, Henk van der
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Meulen, Servaes vander
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1525
Malines or Ghent
c.1592organist and composer
Mey, Thierry de
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Meyer, Edgar
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Meyer, Friedrich
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Meyer, Ernst Hermann
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Meyer, Krzyszt
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11 Aug. 1943
Cracow, Poland
 Polish pianist, writer on music and composer who studied composition with Stanislaw Wiechowicz, Krzysztof Penderecki and with Nadia Boulanger in France
Meyerbeer, Giacomo
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5 Sep 1791
Tasdorf, nr. Berlin, Germany
2 May 1864
Berlin, Germany
born Jacob Liebmann Beer, Meyerbeer was noted German-born opera composer, and the first great exponent of Grand Opera
Meyerovich, Mikhail
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Meylaers, Stefan
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Mezzena, Bruno
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Miaskovsky, Nicolai Yakovlevich
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20 Apr. 1881
Warsaw, Poland
8 Aug. 1950
Moscow, Russia
Miaskovsky was 25 years old when he applied to enter the Moscow Conservatory. His exams were conducted by Rimsky-Korsakov, Lyadov and Glazunov all of whom who would become his professors
Mica, Frantisek Adam Jan
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Michael, Daniel
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Michael, David Moritz
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Michael, Edouard
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Michael, Richard
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Michalowski, Aleksander
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17 May 1851
Kamieniec Podolski, Poland
1938
Warsaw, Polands
Polish pianist, pedagogue and composer who in addition to his own immense technique, had a profound influence upon the teaching of pianoforte technique, especially in relation to the works of Chopin and J S Bach, and left this legacy among a large number of pupils
Michalsky, Donal
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Micháns, Carlos
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1950
Buenos Aires, Argentina
 moved to the Netherlands in 1982, becoming a Dutch citizen in 1988. In his native Argentina he studied composition with Susana Oliveto and Roberto García Morillo, one of the country’s leading composers. He also graduated in conducting at the University of Buenos Aires and the Art Institute of the Teatro Colón, South America’s major opera house. In 1982 he was awarded a scholarship from the Dutch Ministry of Culture and Science, which enabled him to undertake postgraduate studies in composition and electronic music with Hans Kox and Ton Bruynèl at the conservatory of Utrecht, where he obtained the Composition Prize in 1988. A new grant from the Ministry of Culture allowed him to continue his training in electronic music for a year. The catalogue of his compositions comprises over seventy titles, most of them published in Holland by Muziek Groep Nederland (Donemus). In 1992 Carlos Micháns was one of the four musicians representing the Netherlands at the famed international workshop for composers and choreographers held at Bretton Hall in West Yorkshire (UK). En 1998 he was invited to the New Music & Art Festival at Bowling Green State University in Ohio (USA), where he attended performances of his own music and lectured on composition to students of the Faculty of Music. Since 1994 and often sponsored by the Gaudeamus Foundation of Amsterdam, he has been a guest at institutes for higher education and music associations in India, Indonesia, Argentina and Central America, where he lectures on western music and his own work. He also travels regularly to different countries with distinguished Dutch musicians to promote the works of contemporary and Dutch composers. Several works by Carlos Micháns have been awarded international prizes: first prize Promociones Musicales (Argentina) for Tema, Toccata y Fuga (organ, 1977), first prize of the city of Gerona (Spain) for Apparitions (piano, 1990), ‘Trinac Prize 1996’ (Tribuna Nacional de Compositores, Argentina) for his String Quartet Nr. 2 (1992), ‘Trimarg Prize 1996’ (Tribuna Musical Argentina) for Sinfonia Concertante Nr. 2 (violin, cello and orchestra, 1996) and ‘Trinac Prize 2000’ for Après Minuit (ensemble, 1998). Since 1995 Carlos Micháns has been in charge of Podium Neerlandés, a programme of Radio Nederland Wereldomroep designed to promote in Latin America the international and Dutch classical repertoire by some of Holland's leading orchestras and ensembles. He is also active in the field of literature, both in Spanish and in Dutch. His works include Rogelio G. (stories), De Ogen van Meenakshi (The Eyes of Meenakshi, Impressions of South India), El Mercader de Pumpuhar (The Merchant of Poompuhar, stories and legends of India), Madurai, Madurai (novel), La Próxima Parada (The Next Stop, short novel), Poemas Terminales (Terminal Poems), Nuevos Abismos (y otros poemas) [New Abysses (and other poems)], all published by *CMP/Utrecht, and a number of unpublished poetry cycles and essays
Micheelsen, Hans Friedrich
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Michel, Wilfried
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Micheli, de
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Micheli, Antonio
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Michio, Miyagi18941956famous blind Koto performer and composer who had a tremendous influence on many areas of Japanese music. He combined Japanese and Western instruments (for example, concerto for Koto with orchestra) and for this he is often called the Father of Modern Koto Music. He also extended the Koto by inventing new instruments, using new forms, stretching traditional forms, creating new playing techniques, and restoring popularity to the genre. As a teacher, he influenced many Koto players and taught them his new technique including pizzicato, staccato, and harmonics. He introduced Western forms into Japanese music alongside the traditional Japanese forms of kinutamono and tegotomono. His most famous piece is Haru no Umi, the Spring Sea, which can be heard everywhere in Japan during the New Year's holiday. Other famous pieces include Mizu no Hentai, Ochiba no Odori (Dance of the Falling Leaves), Seoto (Sounds of the Rapids) and Tegoto (Interlude)
Michiyo, Yagi
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Michna z Otradovic, Adam
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Michon, Mlle  composer who published in Paris in about 1750
Middelschulte, Wilhelm
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Middleton, Hubert
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Mielck, Ernst (Ernest) Leopold, Christian
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24 Oct. 1877
Viipuri, Finland
22 Oct. 1899
Locarno, Switzerland
one of the most promising talents in the history of Finnish music, he died of tuberculosis at the early age of 21, but not before writing a number of substantial instrumental works demonstrating a solid professional skill and a high degree of innovation; these include the first important Finnish symphony, completed in 1897 — two years before Sibelius's First. Instead of studying at the Helsinki Music Institute, he went abroad at the age of fourteen to study at the Stern Conservatory in Berlin, studying there from 1891 to 1894. He returned to Berlin on two further occasions, in 1895–96 and 1897–98, studying with Max Bruch. Mielck also studied the piano
Mielczewski, Marcin
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 Sep. 1651
Warsaw
a member of the royal orchestra of King Wladislaw IV between 1638 and 1644, from 1645 he became master of the orchestra of Prince Charles Ferdinand, Bishop of Plock. Mielczewski remained in this post until his death. He composed both religious music in the old a cappella style and instrumental canzonas in the Venetian polychoral tradition
Mignard, Aleksandr Konstantinovich (né Scheltobrjacow (or Zheltobryukhov, Scheltobriuchov), Alexander)13 Aug. 1852
Warsaw, Poland
 Polish composer who studied, under Freyer there, then under Saint-Saens at the Paris Conservatory from 1869 to 1871. He afterward studied law, and in 1876 entered the civil service, moving to Moscow in 1893
Mignone, Francisco
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3 Sep. 1897
Sao Paulo, Brazil
2 Feb. 1986
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
after his studies in Italy, he taught composition and conducting at the Escola National de Musica de Rio, leading an active musical life as a composer, pianist and conductor. He wrote operas, symphonic and chamber works as well as works for solo instruments
Mihajlovic, Milan
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Mihalovici, Marcel
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Mikheyeva, Tatyana
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22 Apr. 1962
Talgar, Kazakstan
 studied at the Almaata State Conservatory. She graduated from the Moscow State Conservatory and its postgraduate course under N. N. Sidelnikov. She has written for cinema and theatre, used electronics in her work and written jazz-inspired compositions
Miki, Minoru
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Mikkelborg, Palle
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Mikkola, Pasi-Heikki1965 Finnish Army Band conductor, who is also a prolific composer and arranger
Mikolaj z Chrzanowa
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c. 1485c. 1560Polish composer known only by a single motet, Protexisti, and even that only as an organ transcription
Mikolaj z Radomia
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c. 1400c. 1450Polish composer working at the time of a cultural flowering in Poland during the reign of Wladyslaw Jagiello. Only ten works by Poland's greatest 15th century composer have survived but these confirm that they are typical of the late Medieval period
Mikroutsikos, Thanos
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Milán, Luis [Luys] de
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c. 1500
Spain
after 1561
Spain
a Spanish Renaissance composer, vihuelist (instrument similar to the guitar), and writer on music. He was the first composer in history to publish music for the vihuela de mano, an instrument employed primarily in the Iberian peninsula and some of the Italian states during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and he was also one of the first musicians to specify verbal tempo indications in his music
Milano, Francesco Canova da (see Canova de Milano, Francesco)   
Milchberg, Jorge
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Mildmay, Ladyfl. 15th century
England
 composer of songs
Milesi, Piero
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Miletic, Miroslav  viola player, founder of the Pro Arte string quartet in Zagreb. As a composer he has promoted Croatian folklore and church music (in particular from the island of Hvar). In 1975, accompanied by the Leningrad Philharmonic, he played his Viola concert. He has also collaborated with Karl-Heinz Stockhausen on electronic music
Milhaud, Darius
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4 Sep. 1892
Aix-en-Provence, France
22 Jun. 1974
Geneva, Switzerland
a French composer and teacher. He was a member of Les Six - also known as the Groupe des Six - and one of the most prolific composers of the 20th century
Millar, Marian 
Manchester
 first woman to obtain the degree of Mus. Bac. from Victoria University, Manchester in 1894
Millard, Harrison
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Millard, Mrs Phillip c. 1840
Britain
a composer of many songs, at least two of which were popular
Millault (or Millaut, Millaux), Laurent François Édouard.
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13 Feb. 1808
Paris, France
13 Apr. 1887
Paris, France
French violinist and composer of orchestral music, chamber music, sacred works
Miller, Bernie
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Miller, Edward I
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Miller, George
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18771960conductor of various military bands during the first four decades or so and most notably that of the Grenadier Guards between 1922 and 1942, whose Grand March Galatea was once popular
Miller, Glen
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1904
Clarina, Iowa, USA
15 Dec. 1944
English Channel
American clarinetist, composer and bandleader
Miller, Marcus
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Miller, Paul
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Millocker, Carl
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Mills, Richard
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Milner, Anthony (Francis Dominic)
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13 May 1925
Bristol, England
22 Oct. 2002
Spain
educated at Douai School and the Royal College of Music, where he studied piano with Herbert Fryer and theory with RO Morris. Composition was studied privately, with Matyas Seiber, whom he soon joined at Morley College in the first of a long series of distinguished teaching posts, which included a Lectureship at King’s College London from 1965 to 1971, a Senior (later Principal) Lectureship at Goldsmiths College from 1971 until 1980, and from 1980 until his retirement in 1989 a Principal Lectureship at the RCM, where he had taught part-time since 1961
Milner, Arthur
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1894
England
1972
England
Northumbrian organist and composer, based in Newcatle upon Tyne, who taught Wilfred Josphs
Milner, Cecil
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  a respected backroom boy in London music circles, arranging for many top orchestras such as Mantovani, for whom he supplied around 220 scores. He was also an accomplished composer, with his works willingly accepted by background music publishers such as Harmonic, who issued Primrose Dell on one of their mood music 78 discs in 1949. In the cinema he worked on the 1938 film “The Lady Vanishes”
Milojevic, Miloje18841946he studied at the Munich Conservatory, in France and in Prague where he took a doctorate in 1924-25. A romanticist with and nationalist tendencies, a Serbian Richard Strauss, he was most expressive in his solos (the collection Before Magnificent Nature) and in his piano compositions (Melodies and Rhythms from the Balkans, the suite, Camaieux). He was the leading music critic in Belgrade and the author of valuable musical texts about Serbian and Yugoslav music
Minafra, Pino
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Minard, Robin
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Minezaki, Koto
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fl. 1780-1800 composer of traditional Japanese music
Mingus, Charles
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Minkin, Tzenko
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Minkus, Leon
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Mintchev, Gheorgui
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Mintzer, Bob
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27 Jan. 1953
New Rochelle, New York, USA
 American jazz musician and composer
Mira, Rafael Angel
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Miranda, Ronaldo
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Miraval, Raimon de
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Mircovich, Elisabetta de
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Miró-Charbonnier, Ignacio
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1962
Madrid, Spain
 Spanish guitarist and composer
Miskinis, Vytautas
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Misraki, Paul
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Mitcha, Adam
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Mitchell, Blue
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Mitchell, Joni (born Roberta Joan Anderson)
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7 Nov. 1943
Fort Macleod, Alberta, Canada
 Canadian musician and painter
Mitchell, Roscoe
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Mitchell-Davidson, Paul
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Miteran, Alain
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Miti, Luca
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1957
Rome, Italy
 in his works, Luca Miti tends to put himself in relation to the sound, searching for the interaction between sound and environment, and – more important – between the capability to produce a sound and to receive it. This includes some “theatre” music – raw excerpts of sparse, subtle electronic sounds (as for example in E non mi resta che tornare solo), the audio component of the “sound installation” – Mens Conclusa – a loop with scratching and clicking sounds and mutant voices, and the electronic interaction between two performers (Miti himself and his long time friend Francesco Michi) in the extended Giocattoli (“Toys”) – a sparse sound ambient due to the use of small, low-fi live electronics and “anachronistic” electronic sounds. The sound flux (again from Michi and Miti) that de-sign the time-space of specific place, in II° Progetto per la regolamentazione e l’ordinamento dei flussi estetici per la comunità di Topolò 2001. Finally, Miti's soundtrack for another theatrical piece Immaginate la notte is modeled on Massenet and pregnant with a lyrical atmosphere that finally flows in a tonal ending for accordion, an amusing counterpart for a work that well represents, even if in a fragmented way, the sounding universe of the author
Mitropoulos, Dimitri
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Mitsakis, Yorgos
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Mival, William
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Miyagi, Michio
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Miyake, Jun
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Miyoshi, Akira
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Mizangere (de la), Marquise1693
France
 a noted clavichord player and composer
Mizelle, Dary John
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Mizuma, Hiroaki
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Mo, Fan
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Mo, Wuping
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Mobach, Cees
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Mobley, Hank
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Mochizuki, Misato
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Mocnik, Damijan
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Moderne, Jacques
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Modess, Jochen
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Moe, Eric
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Moenne-Loccoz, Philippe
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1953
Annecy, France
 studied at the Conservatoire in Geneva between 1979 and 1982. Member of the improvisatory instrumental group Frequence7. Teaches electroacoustic composition at the Ecole Nationale de Musique et de Danse, Annecy, France
Moeran, Ernest John
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Moeschinger, Albert
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Mogensen, Michael A.
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1973
Hagerstown, Maryland, USA
 American French horn player, composer, adjudicator, clinician, instructor, and conductor
Mohr, Jean Baptiste
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Mohrhardt, Peter
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Mohrheim, Friedrich Christian
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Mokranjac, Stevan Stojanovic18561914studied in Munich, Rome and Leipzig before becoming director of the Belgrade Choral Society, a group he truend into into an exceptional performing ensemble. Mokranjac's "Fifteen Song Collections" (1883-1909), an a cappella choral composition, was based on the folk melodies of Serbia and Old Serbia, and on that of Kosovo, Montenegro, Macedonia and Bosnia. Mokranjac's church pieces include a Requiem in F-sharp minor. He was among the first Serbian ethnomusicologists
Molchanov, Kirill
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Moleiro, Moises
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1904
Zaraza, Venezuela
1979
Caracas, , Venezuela
Venezuelan pianist and composer
Molina Jimenez, Manuel
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Molinaro, Simone
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Molinet, Jean
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1435
Devres, France
23 Aug. 1507
Valenciennes
France
French poet, chronicler, and composer. He is best remembered for his prose translation of Roman de la rose
Molineux, Allen
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Molino, Andrea
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Molino, Francesco
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Molins, Pierre des
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Molique, Wilhelm Bernhard
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Molitor, Simon
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Molitor, Valentin
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Molique, Bernhard18021869German violinist who studied with Rovelli and for a short time with Spohr. He was professor of composition at the Royal College of Music in London
Molleda, José Muñoz
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10 Feb. 1905
Cadiz, Spain
26 May 1988
Madrid, Spain
Spanish composer
Moller, Peter
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Mollier (de), Louisec. 16151688French patroness and composer
Molloy, James Lynam
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Moloney, Mick
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Molter, Johann Melchior
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Molvaer, Nils Petter
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Molza Porrina, Tarquinia
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1 Nov. 1542
Italy
1617
Modena
a musician at the Este court at Ferrara, singer, violinist and composer for lute, viol and harp, she also led a women’s orchestra. Her performance style was seminal to the creation of the concerto delle donne, and she is said to have acted as instructor and conductor to her fellow musicians. She is one of the few women known to have been an active, named member of a humanist academy, Parma's Innominati; indeed, her scholarship was so respected that in 1610 the Roman Senate voted Roman citizenship to her, giving her the title L'Unica. In 1589 Molza was dismissed from her position as lady-in-waiting for Duchess Margherita Gonzaga d'Este because of her affair with Mantuan composer Giaches de Wert, and returned to Mantua. The issue was apparently more one of class than of sexual peccadillos - a member of the minor nobility (as the handmaids of the duchess were considered) were not supposed to be involved with members of the servant class, as minor composers such as Wert were considered
Mompou, Federico
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Moncayo, Pablo
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Monckton, Lionel
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Mondejar, Alonso de
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Mondonville, Jean-Joseph Cassanea de
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Mongoven, Casey
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30 Apr. 1979
La Jolla, California, USA
 composer of works characterized by Fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio. Studied under Alan Fletcher at New England Conservatory
[information supplied by Casey Mongoven]
Moniot d'Arras
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fl. 1213–1239 French composer of the trouvère tradition. He was a monk who served in the Abbey of Arras in northern France and composed monophonic songs, both secular and sacred
Moniuszko, Stanislaw
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5 May 1819
nr. Minsk, Russia
4 Jun. 1872
Warsaw, Poland
often called 'The Father of Polish Opera', he was an organist and composer of Polish-themed operas, sacred music and secular cantatas. His collection of songs entitled Spiewnik Domowy (Songbook for Home Use) had wide appeal among the Polish public
Monk, Meredith
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Monk, Theolonious
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Monk, William Henry
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Monn, Matthias
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Monnet, Marc
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Monnikendam, Marius
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Mononen, Sakari
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27 Jul. 1928
Finland
7 Jun. 1997
Finland
a church musician and organist, who had a dodecaphonic period in the early 1960s, writing mainly organ works. In the late 1960s, he expanded his output towards chamber music and orchestral music, combining clusters and field technique with dodecaphony. After the mid-1970s, he turned to a free-tonal, somehow Neo-Baroque style
Mononen, Unto
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1930
Somero, Finland
1968
Somero, Finland
a semi-professional bandleader from Somero, Mononen is remembered by his friends as an independent soul who would startle the residents of this quiet rural town by wearing a beret and dark glasses on autumn nights. Mononen made his living by playing in rural dance halls. In the fifties he had published a number of songs, including Satumaa, which had been recorded in 1955 with moderate success. In 1962 Reijo Taipale recorded Satumaa again, and by the beginning of 1963 it was the best selling record in Finland. Every company was now eager to record the tangos of Unto Mononen. Within a few years' time, dozens of his songs were recorded, and many of them became extremely popular. After a downturn in his career, Mononen committed suicide in 1968
Monreal, Genaro
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Monster, Kors
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Montague, Stephen
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Montaine, John la
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Montalbano, Bartolomeo
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Montana, Gentil
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Montand, Yves
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Monte, Lambertus de
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Monte, Philippe (Philippus, Philip) de (also Filippo di Monte or Filips van den Berghe)
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1521
Mechelen
4 Jul. 1603
Prague
a key personality in l6th century music, the leader of the Prague imperial orchestra, he was much admired and revered in his time. De Monte made Prague his real home, end he asked in his testament to be buried in Prague's St. James' Church. His numerous works reflect high creative spirit in all genres and forms (madrigals in the then modern musica reservata style, and motets of 1575 reminiscent of Palestrina)
Monteclair, Michel Pignolet de
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Montemezzi, Italo
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Monterose, J R
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Montesano, Gustavo
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Monte-Varchi (de), Anna Cerrini1833
Switzerland
 pupil of Chopin 1821-1873, she composed for piano
Monteux, Pierre
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Monteverdi, Claudio
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bap. 15 May 1567
Cremona, Italy
29 Nov. 1643
Venice, Italy
his work marks the transition from Renaissance to Baroque music. During his long life he produced work that can be classified in both categories, and he was one of the most significant revolutionaries that brought about the change in style. Monteverdi wrote the earliest dramatically viable opera, Orfeo, and was fortunate enough to enjoy fame during his lifetime.
Montgeroult, Helene de Nervode1767
France
1836a teacher at the Paris Conservatoire, pianist and published composer who exerted an important influence on early French piano pedagogy
Montgomerie, Alexander
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Montgomery, Wes
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Monti, Vittorio
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Montoya, Lole
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Montoya, Ramon
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Montrose, Jack
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Montsalvatge, Xavier
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Monza, Carlo II
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Moody, Ivan
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1964
London, England
 composer, writer, editor, conductor, and teacher, he studied music and theology at the Universities of London (winning the Royal Holloway Prize in 1984 for his Three Poems of Anna Akhmatova), Joensuu (Finland) and York, his composition teachers being Brian Dennis, Sir John Tavener and William Brooks. He lives at present in Estoril, Portugal
Moody, James I
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Moody, James II
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Moondog (see Hardin, Louis T.)   
Moore, Brew
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Moore, Douglas Stuart
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10 Aug. 1893
Cutchogue, New York, USA
25 Jul. 1969
Greenport, New York, USA
American composer, educator and writer most famous for two operas The Devil and Daniel Webster (1938) and The Ballad of Baby Doe (1956)
Moore, Glen
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Moore, John Arlington
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5 Oct. 1938
Kingston, Jamaica
16 Aug. 2008
Kingston, Jamaica
trumpeter, composer and arranger
Moore, Lloyd
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Moore, Michael
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Moore, Sir Patrick
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4 Mar. 1923
Pinner, Middlesex
 astronomer, author and self-taught musician and talented composer, he has displayed his xylophone-playing skills at a Royal Variety Performance and once accompanied the physicist Albert Einstein on the piano as he played Saint-Saëns' Swan on the violin
Moore, Philip
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Moore, Thomas
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Moore, Undine Smith25 Aug. 1904
Jarrett, Virginia, USA
6 Feb. 1989
Petersberg, Virginia, USA
Moore’s career as an educator included a 45-year tenure at Virginia State College. She shared her interest in the music of Black America through workshops and lectures across the United States. She composed choral works, chamber and orchestral music, and solo works for the voice and for various solo instruments
Moorer, Pim
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Moraes, Vinicius de
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19 Oct. 1913
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
9 Jul. 1980
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
born Marcus Vinicius da Cruz de Mello Moraes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, son of Lydia Cruz de Moraes and Clodoaldo Pereira da Silva Moraes. Vinicius was a seminal figure in the contemporary Brazilian music. As a poet, he wrote lyrics for a great number of songs that became all-time classics. He was also a composer of bossa nova, a playwright, a diplomat and, as an interpreter of his own songs, he left several important albums
Moraeus, Kalle
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Moraeus, Pereric
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Morago, Estavao Lopes
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Morales, Cristóbal de
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c. 1500
Seville, Spain
7 Oct. 1553
Marchena, Spain
a Spanish composer of the Renaissance. He is generally considered to be the most influential Spanish composer before Victoria
Moran, Robert
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Morandi, Giovanni1777
Pergola, Italy
1856
Senigallia, Italy
the son of Pietro Morandi (1739-1815, organist and former pupil of the great Padre Martini), Giovanni studied with his father, who then held a post at Senigallia cathedral, and soon helped him out both in the church and at the singing school. He married one of his father's pupils, Rosa Morolli, who became a famous singer and whom he accompanied on tour. On her death (1824) he returned to Senigallia to become maestro di cappella and to teach singing, composition and organ. His sacred music is almost exclusively written in the operatic vein. He also published collections of sonatas in a lively and brilliant style reminiscent of Mozart
Morata, Gines de
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Moratelli, Sebastiano
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Morawetz, Oscar
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17 Jan. 1917
Svetlá nad Sázavou, Austro-Hungarian Empire
13 Jun. 2007
Toronto, Canada
composer, pianist and teacher
Moree, Louis de
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Moreira, Airto
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Moreira, Antonio Leal
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Morel, Jacques
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Morel, Jorge
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Morelenbaum, Jacques
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1954
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
 Brazilian cellist and composer best known internationally for his score (with Antonio Pinto) for Walter Salles’s acclaimed drama Central do Brasil (Central Station), which won the top prize at the 1998 Berlin Film Festival and an Oscar nomination as Best Foreign-Language Film. With Caetano Veloso, he also created the music for Fábio Barreto’s O Quatrilho (1995), also an Oscar nominee for Best Foreign-Language Film, and Cacá Diegues' Orfeu do Carnaval
Moreno, Francisco Javier
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Moreno Buendia, Manuel
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Moreno Torroba, Federico
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Morente, Enrique
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Morera, Enric
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Mores, Mariano
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Moretti, Felice
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Moretti, Niccolo
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Moretti, Raoul
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1893
Marseille, France
1954
Marseille, France
best remembered nowadays for his operetta and film works. He enjoyed popularity from his first success En Chemyse (1924), to 1932, with the movie Il est charmant. However, his biggest hit has been the operetta Comte Obligado in 1927. A classically trained pianist and owning his own music publishing house in Marseille, he liked to write songs that would be featured later in the repertoire of the "vaudeville" stars
Morgan, Caleb
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Morgan, David
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Morgan, Frank
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Morgan, Justin
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Morgan, Lady (nee Sydney Owenson)c. 1783
England
1859composer of the well-known operetta The First Attempt (1807)
Morgan, Lee
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Morgan, Thomas
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fl. 1690s English/Irish music and composer particularly of music for the stage (London)
Mori, Ikue
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Morin, Jean-Baptiste
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Morisina, Marieta Priolifl. 1665 composer
Moritz, Edvard
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Morks, Jan I
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Morlacchi, Francesco
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14 Jun 1784
Perugia, Italy
28 Oct 1841
Innsbruck, Austria
Italian composer of over 20 operas who worked for many years in Dresden
Morlaye, Guillaume
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c.1510c.1558an instrumentalist as well as a music publisher and composer
Morley, Angela
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10 Mar 1924
Leeds, Yorkshire, UK
14 Jan. 2009
Scottsdale, Arizona, USA
composer and orchestrator, widely regarded as one of the finest English arrangers and film composers, although her early career (when she was known as Wally Stott) really took off when she provided the music for numerous Goon Show broadcasts on BBC Radio in the 1950s
Morley, Thomas
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1557/58
Norwich, England
Oct. 1602
London, England
an English composer, theorist, editor and organist of the Renaissance, and the foremost member of the English Madrigal School. He was the most famous composer of secular music in Elizabethan England, and the composer of the only surviving contemporary settings of verse by Shakespeare
Morison, Christina W.1840
Ireland
 composer of the opera The Uhlans, also piano pieces and songs
Morlock, Jocelyn
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Mormile, Carlo
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Mornington, 1st Earl of (see Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington)   
Moroder, Giorgio
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26 Apr. 1940
Urtijëi (Ortisei), Italy
 three-time Oscar winning Italian record producer, songwriter and performer. His work with synthesizers during the 1970s and 1980s had a significant influence on new wave, house, techno and electronic music in general
Moroi, Makoto
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Moross, Jerome
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Morricone, Ennio
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Morris, John
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Morris, Robert Leigh22 Apr. 1941
Chicago, Illinois, USA
 Morris received his bachelor’s degree from DePaul University in Chicago, with graduate studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and The University of Iowa, Iowa City. He served as choral director at Hampton University, Virginia, Winston-Salem State University, North Carolina, and at Jackson State University in Mississippi before accepting his current post as Director of Choral Activities for Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota. Choral arranger for Edward “Duke” Ellington and founder of the Leigh Morris Chorale, Morris has also composed numerous works for mixed chorus, most of which use Afrocentric folk themes
Morrison, Jim
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Morrow, Charlie
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Mortari, Virgilio
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Mortelmans, Lodewijk
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18681952a pupil of Benoit and Blockx, he succeeded them as the director of the Royal Flemish Conservatory. He held that post from 1924 to 1933 and like his predecessors he was an enthusiastic promoter of Belgian music. He served as the president of the Society of Flemish Composers and founded Nieuwe Concerten (New Concerts) which enriched the musical life of Antwerp. He spent much of the earlier part of his career writing symphonic works, such as The Myth of Spring. After a decade working on opera and overcoming the tragic deaths of his wife and two of his children, he returned to symphonic music in 1917 with two beautiful elegies
Mortensen, Finn
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Morton, Ferdinand (Jelly Roll)
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20 Oct. 1890
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
10 Jul. 1941
Los Angeles, California, USA
an American virtuoso pianist, a bandleader, and a composer who some call the first true composer of jazz music. Morton was a colorful character who liked to generate publicity for himself by bragging. His business card referred to him as the "Originator of Jazz"
Morton, Robert
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c.1430
England
after Mar. 1479English composer of the early Renaissance, mostly active at the Burgundian court. He was highly regarded at the time. Only secular vocal music, all rondeaux for three voices, survive
Morungen, Heinrich von
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fl. c.1200-1217 an important German Minnesinger
Mosalini, Juan Jose
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Mosca, Luca
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Moscheles, Ignaz
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23 May 1794
Prague
10 Mar 1870
Leipzig, Germany
Bohemian piano virtuoso, composer and teacher, who taught Mendelssohn. In 1826 Moscheles chose to live in England. In 1837 and 1838 he conducted Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with great success at the Philharmonic Society's concerts
Mosolov, Alexander
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11 Aug. (Old Style 27 Jul.) 1900
Kiev, Russia
11 Jul. 1973
Moscow, Russia
Russian composer
Mosonyi, Mihály
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18151870Liszt’s contemporary and friend, pianist and composer. His early works adhered to German musical traditions but from 1856 he embraced Hungarian Romanticism which incorporated Hungarian folk tunes
Moss, David
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Moss, Piotr
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Mossi, Giovanni
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Mossmayr, Johann Baptist
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Mossolov, Alexander
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Mosto, Giovanni Battista
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Moszkowski, Moritz
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Moszumanska-Nazar, Krystyna
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5 Sep. 1924
Lwów, Poland (now Lviv, Ukraine)
 about her compositions she has says, "There are two types of chords that I have favored in all of my music: one of them is a juxtaposition of two minor thirds, the second is built from two superimposed fourths, a perfect fourth and a tritone. I like shifting these harmonies around, but do not write them out in tables or pre-compositional systems. [...] In creating, one has to be an egoist, one has to express oneself." [Moszumanska-Nazar, unpublished interview with Trochimczyk, (1995)]
Motian, Paul
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Motiekaitis, Ramunas
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Motovunjanin, Andrijac. 1470
Motovun, Istria
unknownearly Croatian composer
Mottl, Felix
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Moulaert, Raymond (Auguste Marie)
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4 Feb. 1875
Brussels, Belgium
18 Jan. 1962
Uccle, Belgium
Belgian composer, pianist and teacher who wrote one of the earliest surviving saxophone quartets
Moulinie, Etienne
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Moulu, Pierre
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c.1484c.1550a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance who was active in France, probably in Paris
Mounsey, Ann Shepard (Mrs. Bartholomew)1811
London
1891friend of Mendelssohn and spoken of as a child prodigy
Mouquet, Jules
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10 Jul. 1867
Paris, France
25 Oct. 1946
Paris, France
student of harmony and composition at the Paris Conservatoire. In 1896 he was awarded the Grand Prix de Rome for his cantata Melusine, the Prix Tremont in 1905 and the Prix Chautier in 1907 for Chamber Music. He was appointed Professor of Harmony at the Paris Conservatoire in 1913. He wrote a Cours complementaire d'harmonie, oratorios, symphonic poems, and various pieces for wind instruments, including a septet and works for flute, oboe, clarinet, and saxophone. Today he is best known for La Flute de Pan. During the sonata's three movements, the cloven-hoofed Pan, the Greek god of shepherds and their flocks, is heard playing his flute in armorous serenades and lively peasant dances
[entry provided by Samantha Smith]
Mouret, Jean-Joseph
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Moussorgsky, Modeste (see Mussorgsky, Modest Petrovich)   
Mouton, Charles
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1617c.1699French lutenist and composer
Mouton, Jean [Jehan]
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c. 1459
nr. Boulogne-sur-Mer
30 Oct. 1522
St. Quentin, France
Franco-Flemish singer composer of the Renaissance, who was most likely in charge of the musical production on the occasion of a spectacular meeting that took place from June 7 to June 24, 1520, between King Henry VIII of England and King Francis I of France known as the Field of Cloth of Gold (in French Le Camp de Drap d'Or). The French royal chapel had one of the finest choirs in Europe, and contemporary accounts indicated that they "delighted their hearers". Mouton was famous both for his motets, which are among the most refined of the time, and for being the teacher of Adrian Willaert, one of the founders of the Venetian School
Mower, Mike
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Moyreau, Christophe
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Moyse, Marcel (Joseph)
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17 May 1889
St. Amour, Jura
1 Nov. 1984
Brattleboro, Vermont, USA
flautist and composer of études and other works for flute; author of manuals for flute. Co-founder of the Marlboro School and Music Festival
Moyzes, Alexander
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Mozart, Maria Anna 'Nannerl' [Maria Anna Walburga Ignatia Filia Legitima]
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bap. 30 Jul. 1751
Salzburg, Austria
29 Oct. 1829
Salzburg, Austria
seen as the musical equivalent of Wolfgang, half of a sister-brother act that toured the capitals of Europe. As late as 1765 in London, she received top billing in concert advertisements written by her father. That soon changed, however, as the children grew older. Because he was the younger of the two, and because he performed his own compositions, Wolfgang became the star and Nannerl the supporting player. It is known that she wrote music but none of her compositions has survived
Mozart, Franz Xaver
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26 July 1791
Vienna, Austria
29 Jul. 1844
Karlsbad, Germany
son of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He received excellent music instruction, his teachers included Antonio Salieri and Johann Nepomuk Hummel. In the 1820s, Mozart was one of 50 composers to write a Variation on a theme of Antonio Diabelli. He never married or had children
Mozart, Leopold
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14 Nov. 1719
Augsburg, Germany
28 May 1787
Salzburg
Austria
besides being the teacher and promoter of his famous son, was a capable composer and author of Versuch einer gründlichen Violinschule (1756; tr. 1951), of interest today as a record of 18th-century musical practice
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus
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27 Jan. 1756
Salzburg, Austria
5 Dec. 1791
Vienna, Austria
baptized as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart he was a child progedy both as a performer and composer who during his relatively short life composing over 40 symphonies, many operas, sacred music and concertos and chamber music. It has been said that while Haydn showed Mozart how to write string quartets, Mozart showed his teacher how string quartets should be written
Mozetich, Marjan
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7 Jan 1948
Gorizia, Italy
 born of Yugoslav parents and now a naturalized Canadian, he works as a composer and teacher
Mtchedelov, Mikhail Pavlovic
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1903
Russia
1974Russian harpist and composer
Muczynski, Robert
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19 Mar, 1929
Chicago, USA
 contemporary composer and pianist. His father's parents' emigrated from Warsaw, Poland to Chicago; his mother was of Slovak descent, moving to the U.S. in 1910. He studied piano with Walter Knupfer and composition with Alexander Tcherepnin at DePaul University in Chicago, where he received the Bachelor of Music degree (1950) and the Master of Music degree (1952). Both degrees were in Piano Performance. At his Carnegie Hall debut in 1958 he presented a program of his own piano works
Mudarra, Alonso
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c. 1508
Spain
1 Apr. 1580
Seville, Spain
a Spanish composer and vihuelist of the Renaissance. He was an innovative composer of instrumental music as well as songs, and was the composer of the earliest surviving music for the four-course guitar, which was then a relatively new instrument
Mudd, John
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Mudd, Thomas I
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Mudd, Thomas II
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Mudde, Willem
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Mudge, Richard
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Muffat, Georg
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Muffat, Gottlieb
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Mukarno, Philemon
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Mul, Jan
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Mulder, Herman
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Muldowney, Dominic
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1952
Southampton, UK
 Dominic Muldowney studied at Southampton University with Jonathan Harvey, at York University with Bernard Rands and David Blake, and privately with Sir Harrison Birtwistle, who invited him to be his Assistant Music Director at the Royal National Theatre, London. He succeeded Birtwistle as Director in 1981 and remained there until 1997 and was also Composer in Residence to Southern Arts Association (1974-76) and more recently, between 1996-98 was Composer in Association to the Orchestra of St John’s Smith Square.
Mule, Giuseppe
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Mulet, Henri
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Mulgan, Lucy
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Mullenbach, Alexander
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1949
Luxembourg
 pianist, chamber musician and composer from Luxembourg
Muller, Adolf
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Muller, Iwan
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Muller, Johann Christian Samuel
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Muller, Joseph
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Müller, Wenzel
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26 Sep. 1767
Trnava, Austria
3 Aug. 1835
Baden
Austrian composer and conductor
Muller, Wim Statius
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Muller Siemens, Detlev
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Mulligan, Gerry
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Mullinar, Michael
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18951973English composer of songs and music for children
Mulvey, Gráinne
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10 Mar. 1966
Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
 studied with Eric Sweeney, Hormoz Farhat, Agustín Fernández and gained a DPhil in Composition at the University of York under Nicola LeFanu. In 1994 she won the Composers’ Class of the RTÉ Musician of the Future Competition and in 1998 was awarded the Macaulay Fellowship. Scorched Earth, for orchestra, represented Ireland at the 2006 International Rostrum of Composers in Paris, and went on to receive broadcasts across the globe. She is currently Head of Composition at Dublin Institute of Technology while pursuing post-doctoral research into electro-acoustic and computer music with Dr Victor Lazzarini at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth
[entry provided by Joe O'Farrell]
Mumma, Gordon
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Mun, Emma1858
England
1896a cellist and student of the Royal Academy who made her first public appearance at nine
Munch, Andreas
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Mundry, Isabel
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Mundy, John
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Mundy, William
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c.1529
England
c.1591
England
English composer
Munro, Alexander
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  his 'Collection of the Best Scots Tunes Fited [sic] to the German Flute With Several Divisions, & Variation' appeared in Paris in 1732. The publication contains twelve well-known tunes, each with a group of variations and set to a figured bass. 'Fy gar rub her over wi' strae' is one of the longer examples, featuring a group of divisions on the original melody followed by several versions of the tune in different metres, tempos and dance forms. The text of the original song extols the virtues of making hay while the sun shines, "afore auld age your vitals nip,"and in a highly politically incorrect fashion. 'Fy gar' seems to be an Aberdeen colloquialism for 'get a move on'
Muntzberger, Joseph
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1769
Brussels
Jan 1844
France
his German father, Wenzeslaus Muntzberger, was chamber musician in the service of Prince Charles of Lorraine, Governor of the Netherlands. Although Fetis writes that the young six-year old Muntzberger played a Concerto before the Prince, on a tenor viol, handled somewhat like the Violoncello and on account of this performance he was induced to have the boy instructed by the violinist, Van Maldere, this account must be erroneous, for Van Maldere died on November 3, 1768, a year before Muntzberger's birth. In 1790, following his studies in Paris, he accepted a place in the orchestra of the Theatre Lyrique et Comique, but after a time gave it up and entered the orchestra of the Theatre Feydeau, of which he became first cellist after Cardon's resignation. Besides this, he was a member of Napoleon the First's band, as well as, later, of the King's. Muntzberger composed a good deal for the Violoncello - namely, five Concertos, a Symphonie Concertante, Trios, in which, besides the Cello obbligato, the violin and bass take part; a great number of Duets, Fantasias, and Variations; two books of Sonatas, with bass; three of Etudes and Caprices, as well as a Nouvelle Methode pour le Violoncelle. The latter work in all probability appeared before 1800, as in it, as in Boccherini's compositions, besides the bass and tenor and violin clefs, the alto and soprano clefs are used, which do not occur in French books of instruction after this date
Müntzer (Muentzer, Muntzer), Thomas
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c. 1488
Stolberg, Thuringia, Germany
27 May 1525
Muehlhausen, Thuringia, Germany
an early Reformation-era German Anabaptist who was a rebel leader during the Peasants' War, writer of hymns
Munz, Harald
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1965
Württemberg, Germany
 avant-garde German composer
Muradeli, Vano Ilich
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6 Apr. (Old Style 24 Mar.) 1908
Gori, Georgia
14 Aug. 1970
Tomsk
Russian composer who wrote strongly patriotic works
Murail, Tristan
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1947
Le Havre, France
 having completed his university studies (degrees in Economics, Political Science, Classical and Dialectic Arabic), he entered Olivier Messiaen’s class at the Conservatoire de Paris, where he was awarded first prize in composition in 1971. Between 1971 and 1973, when he lived at the Villa Médicis, he met Giacinto Scelsi, before co-founding the Ensemble Itinéraire and developing various styles of keyboard, such as ondes Martenot, electronic organs, synthesizers. A regular contributor to Ircam’s activities, he created two works there, Désintégrations for ensemble and band (1983) and L’Esprit des dunes for ensemble and electronics (1994). He has taught musical computing at the Conservatoire de Paris and at Ircam. Murail now lives in New York, where he teaches at Columbia University
Muratori, Angiola Teresafl. 1689-1696
Bologna
 composer
Murcia, Santiago de
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 after 1732a Spanish guitarist and composer of whose life little is known
Mureau (or Mureue), Gilles
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c.1450Jul 1512
nr. Chartes, France
a French composer and singer of the Renaissance. He was active in central France, mainly Chartres, and was one of the composers listed by Eloy d'Amerval in his long 1508 poem Le livre de la deablerie as one of the great composers of the age, resident in Paradise – even though he was still alive. While he was probably wrote a substantial number of works, only four secular compositions survive
Muro, Juan Antonio
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18 Jun. 1945
Sabadell, Spain
 composer now based in Finland who specializes in guitar music
Murphy, Gerry
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Murphy, Lyle "Spud" (see Stephanovic, Miko)   
Murray, David
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Murray, James R
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Murrill, Herbert
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Murschhauser, Franz Xaver Anton
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Murto, Matti
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12 Jul. 1947
Finland
 composer who has written pedagogical works, chamber music and concertos
Muset, Colin
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fl. 1200 French trouvère, poet, musician and a native of Lorraine
Musgrave, Thea
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Mussi, Giulio
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Mussorgsky, Modest Petrovich
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21 Mar. 1839
Karevo, Russia
28 Mar. 1881
St. Petersburg, Russia
one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. He strove to achieve a uniquely Russian musical identity, often in deliberate defiance of the established conventions of Western music. Many of his major works were inspired by Russian history, Russian folklore, and other nationalist themes, including the opera Boris Godunov, the orchestral tone poem Night on the Bare Mountain, and the piano suite Pictures at an Exhibition. For many years Mussorgsky's works were mainly known in versions revised or completed by other composers. Many of his most important compositions have recently come into their own in their original forms, and some of the original scores are now also available
Mustapha-Zadeh, Vagif
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16 Mar. 1940
Baku, Azerbaijan
17 Dec. 1979
Tashkent
invented a fusion of jazz and mugam, a rhythmically complex folk form; he led groups, made an impressive appearance at a jazz festival in Estonia '67, won a prize for his composition Expecting Aziza in Monaco '79; his albums incl. Jazz Compositions and In Kiev on Soviet labels
Mustonen, Olli
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7 Jun. 1967
Helsinki, Finland
 pianist and composer. Mustonen's predilection for contrapuntally interwoven compositions and works of the 20th century which take up ideas from the 17th and 18th centuries (e.g. the Bach arrangements by Ferruccio Busoni and the cycles of preludes and fugues by Paul Hindemith or Shostakovich), is reflected in his own works as well. His style is often referred to as neo-baroque or neo-classical. It is characterized by simple rhythms, scaled down instrumentation (strings and a few wind instruments), and the use of genre names as work titles, e.g. Gavotte, Toccata or Petite Suite
Muthel, Johann Gottfried
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Muti, Giovanni II Battista
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Myaskovsky (or Miaskovsky), Nikolai Yakovlevich
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20 Apr. 1881
Novogeorgiyevsk
nr. Warsaw, Poland
8 Aug. 1950
Moscow, Russia
Russian composer, sometimes referred to as the "father of the Soviet symphony"
Mycielski, Zygmunt
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Myddleton, W.H.  a name well known to orchestras and bands earlier in the century, primarily for classical arrangements and his potpourris, of Welsh melodies, entitled The Leek (1920), or English melodies The Rose, or American melodies By the Swanee River and, in cake-walk rhythm, Down South. All these were published in piano, orchestral and band versions, Down South even for mixed voice chorus. He was more than just an arranger, as his output included several original pieces for piano like Eventide ("Le declin du jour") Opus 7 and songs, of which Lorna Doone achieved some popularity
Myers, Sherman (see Ewing, Montague )   
Myers, Stanley
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6 Oct. 1930
Birmingham, England
9 Nov. 1993
England
prolific British film composer who scored over sixty films
Mylius, Johann Daniel
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Myrow, Joseph
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Myslivecek, Josef
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9 Mar. 1737
Horní Šárka , Bohemia
4 Feb. 1781
Rome, Italy
J. Myslivecek promoted himself in Italy, where generally only national composers could succeed. He won over the Italian audience with his first opera, Bellerofonte, and at once ranked among the top Italian composers of opera seria. He was also popular in Bohemia, where operas were accompanied by new religious texts in order that they could be sung even in church. He was labelled Il divino Boemo Venatorino by the Italian public. His success is based on inexhaustible melodic invention, connected with Italian technique and colouration. He also impressed W. A. Mozart, with whom he had been friends since 1770. Apart from 28 operas, he also wrote 10 oratorios and cantatas, numerous chamber music scores, and orchestral and concert music