music theory online : artistic orchestrationlesson 42
Dr. Brian Blood





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The principal aim of any teacher should be to make himself dispensable.
Hans Keller (1919-1985), Austrian-born musicologist


Important: To see and hear our 'live' music examples you will need to install the free Scorch plug-in for PC and MAC systems.


Alan Belkin's Artistic Orchestration :: top

Artistic Orchestration is a wonderful introduction to this fascinating topic.

Click here to download this guide in pdf format. It can be saved to your disk for offline browsing.

The index below gives a flavour of the book.


Table of contents

  1. Introduction: Why This Book?

  2. Preliminary Considerations
  3. Basic Notions, Part 1
    • Orchestration and Form
    • Changes of sound
    • Degree of Continuity/Contrast
    • Interpreting the Phrasing
    • Orchestration and Dynamics
    • Register
    • Color
    • Sustained vs. Dry Sound
    • Fat vs. Thin Sound; Unison Doubling
    • Balance: Simultaneous and Successive

  4. Basic Notions, Part 2
    • Musical Lines vs. Instrumental Parts
    • Planes of Tone
    • Contrapuntal Orchestration
    • The Tutti

  5. Orchestral Accompaniment

  6. Summary: What is good orchestration?

  7. Appendix: Some Pedagogical Ideas
    • Examples from a Character Glossary
    • Outline Sketches as a Teaching Tool
    • Learning Orchestration from the Repertoire
    • Orchestral Simulation

  8. Conclusion and Acknowledgements

  9. Appendix Glossary 1


This material is © Alan Belkin, 2001. Legal proof of copyright exists.
The material may be used free of charge provided that the author's name is included.


References:


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